Vintage glass bowls with lids

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All You Ever Wanted to Know About Lead in Vintage Pyrex Bowls

Yellow, green red and blue vintage pyrex bowls for cooking

photo by Emily Carlin. See the original here.

This article was originally published October of 2015. It was last updated October 28, 2018

If you are wondering if your old Pyrex dishes contain lead or are still safe to use in your kitchen, you have come to the right place!

I grew up using (what are now considered) vintage Pyrex bowls and baking in vintage Pyrex dishes. 

In fact, my mom and grandmother both owned a set of the same colorful Pyrex nesting mixing bowls shown above. 

These were the same Pyrex bowls I hoped to own one day as well.

My whole life, these colorful Pyrex mixing bowls have been my very favorite to use. 

As a child, I learned how to cook eggs in a microwave in the little blue one. I've made a hundred batches or more of muffins, cookies, and pancake batter in the big yellow one. 

Here is picture of me with my mom making a pie crust in the green one:

mother and child baking together with vintage pyrex mixing bowl

So I get it. 

I get it when people are upset about a documentary film maker telling them that there is lead in their Pyrex bowls and dishes. 

These things are part of people's childhood memories. These Pyrex bowls remind people of their grandmother - and nobody messes with memories of Grandma!

Beyond grandma, a lot of people collect vintage Pyrex bowls and baking dishes. 

Not only are these pieces beautiful, but they make people feel connected to their mothers and grandmothers by using their kitchen items. 

To be told these things associated with so many happy feelings is possibly poisoning them is hard to hear.

Some people (like me) even started collecting vintage pyrex as a safe alternative to plastic kitchenware - and to learn they were wrong in that regard is hurtful, frustrating and embarrassing. 

Green vintage pyrex baking dish with lid that has tested positive for lead with a 3M leadcheck swab

(click here or on the image to go directly to this post on Facebook)

The problem is, that once you know that there is lead in the coating of your vintage Pyrex bowls (or Anchor Hocking dishe or similar dishware) you have to decide what to do next.

Is there lead in vintage Pyrex bowls and baking dishes?

Yes. Almost all vintage Pyrex bowls and baking dishes test positive for lead when using an XRF (a precision scientific instrument that will report the exact quantity of lead, cadmium and other heavy metals found in an item). 

Many vintage Pyrex bowls and baking dishes will also "swab positive" - this means that a reactive agent swab like the 3M LeadCheck swabs will be able to detect lead in quantities above 600 parts-per-million.

This type of test works by getting part of the surface coating (usually paint) to rub off onto the swab. If leaded paint can rub off onto a swab, it's able to rub off onto your hands and get into your body.

It is important to note that 3M LeadCheck Swabs can only accurately test certain types of things.

It is possible that you might test your vintage Pyrex bowl with a swab and it won't turn red even if the dish contains a high amount of lead. Do not assume your dish is lead free because your LeadCheck Swab did not turn red!

Where is the lead in vintage Pyrex bowls and baking dishes?

The highest concentration of lead is usually in the paint on the outside of the Pyrex bowl or dish.

With some very rare exceptions, the paint on the outside of both vintage Pyrex and vintage Corningware bowls and baking dishes will usually test positive for lead between 15,000 - 100,000 PPM lead. 

For reference, 90 PPM is the highest amount of lead allowed in items intended for children and if house paint has more than 600 PPM lead, it is considered "lead paint" and needs remediation. 

15,000 PPM lead is a LOT of lead. 

100,000 PPM lead means that a full 10% of the paint formula is pure lead. 

That is a LOT of lead.

Do you have vintage Pyrex dishes? Check the Lead Safe Mama website to see if a pattern you own has tested positive for lead: See if your vintage Pyrex design has tested positive for lead.

Tamara Rubin is the director and producer of the forthcoming documentary, MisLEAD: America's Secret Epidemic and is also an independent lead safety advocate online as The Lead Safe Mama. 

She runs the Lead Safe Mama website where she posts the results of lead tests. Most of her lead tests are performed with a non-radioactive source XRF instrument which can detect exact quantities of lead, cadmium and other heavey metals in the single digit parts-per-million (PPM).

Does the milk glass used in vintage Pyrex contain lead?

The milk glass interiors used in many vintage Pyrex and Anchor Hocking pieces commonly contain lead. 

The lead in milk glass is probably inert and trapped in the glass, however, no lab tests are currently being done on these vintage pieces so we have no way to know for sure if these pieces are safe for food contact. 

It is probable that using vintage milk glass with highly acidic foods or using glass that is scratched may release some of the lead contained in the glass -- as these are common ways lead is able to leach from glass.

The problem is that as you use the dish, there is no way to tell that you've reached the point where your bowl or dish is leaching lead.

How to tell if Pyrex is vintage?

When I talk about lead in vintage Pyrex, I am talking about Pyrex manufactured between the 1940's and the 1980's.

Classic signs of vintage Pyrex include:

  • White opaque or milk glass body
  • Painted outsides

The information in this post does not necessarily apply to modern Pyrex, which generally has a clear glass or tinted (but translucent) body. 

For more information on vintage Pyrex patterns and what year your vintage Pyrex was made, see the database from The Pyrex Collector.

Is vintage Pyrex safe to use?

The short answer to this is "I wouldn't use it."

"I don't cook with the outside of the bowl so I'm fine." - Facebook user

This was a common response to the test posted on Facebook. 

People insisted that since food doesn't come in contact with the outside of the bowls, these tests do nothing more than drum up fear. 

The problem is, that if lead is coming off onto a Lead Check Swab, that means it IS rubbing off - in small, even microscopic (but still dangerous) amounts - and it becomes available to be transferred to your mouth, eyes, or even your child's food or body. 

Even though you can't see it....every time you touch it...every time you stack it inside another dish...every time you run it through the dishwasher...every time you wipe it with a rag...lead is being sloughed off into your environment.

All of these actions will release a microscopic amount of lead from the paint that can contaminate your environment.

Since these kinds of things tend to happen in your kitchen, using your vintage Pyrex bowls that are lead contaminated will just continue to contaminate your kitchen space!

If you carry the dish to the table and a micro amount of lead comes off on your hands and then you turn around and start preparing your child's food, you're spreading that contamination. 

If you child touches the dish as it's being passed around the table and gets lead on their hands and then puts their hands in their mouth, they've just ingested lead. 

As much as I really wish I could tell you that your vintage Pyrex is still safe to use around your family, I would strongly advise against it. 

Even though the amount of paint transferred with each use is small (so small you won't be able to see it), these tiny amounts of lead build up in our bodies and can have irreversible side effects - especially in children.

Is lead really that big of a deal?

"It's not like my kids are eating paint chips." - Facebook user

While chances that you will get acute lead poisoning from using vintage Pyrex are minimal, do not underestimate the damage exposure to tiny amounts of lead can do over time. 

As lead accumulates in the body, it can cause irreversible damage. 

Young children are the ones most prone to lead damage as their nervous systems are still developing. 

Common side effects in children exposed to low levels of lead over time include:

  • Reduced IQ
  • Behavior problems
  • Hearing problems
  • Learning difficulties
  • Growth delays

Knowing that most lead poisoning is not acute, but rather, happens in very small, microscopic doses over time, I personally try to avoid using any lead containing products in my home because no beautiful object is worth the risk to my family's health.

How can I tell if my Vintage Pyrex bowl contains lead?

The Lead Safe Mama has a catalog of items she has tested for lead on her website. 

Go here to see the test results for vintage Pyrex dishes on the Lead Safe Mama website. 

Go here to see the results for vintage Corning and vintage Corningware items on the Lead Safe Mama website. 

I would start by looking there to see if the Pyrex dish you own is one that has already been tested.

Keep in mind that these results are not exhaustive. 

Tamara (Lead Safe Mama) has tested thousands of items over the last decade and has only somewhat recently started cataloging the results on her website. 

The Facebook group, The Lead (pb) Group, is also a great place to post a photo of the dishes you have to see if anyone has had theirs tested and what the results were.

Can I test my vintage Pyrex bowls and other vintage Pyrex dishes for lead at home?

The company, 3M, makes a great product called the 3M LeadCheck Swab. 

This swab contains both liquid and powder inside a plastic tube.

When you crush the inner tubes (think: like cracking a glow stick to activate it), the fluid can be used to test things for lead.

To use it, rub an activated swab on a suspicious item, being sure the fluid is in full contact with the item.. If the swab turns red or pink, then the item contains 600 PPM or more of lead.

It is important to keep in mind that there are limitations to how well you can use this to test vintage dishes for lead.

1) LeadCheck Swabs are designed to test PAINT. 

They work by rubbing a very small amount of paint off onto the swab where it reacts (or not) with the fluid to produce a positive or negative test result.

LeadCheck swabs are, therefore NOT effective at testing:

  • Shiny glazes
  • Glass
  • Milk glass
  • Plastic

If you are able to get a LeadCheck swab to return a positive result on any of the above items, that would mean that the item is likely very high lead AND that lead rubs off easily

Definitely not something you want to have at home!

It would, however, be appropriate to use on the painted exterior of vintage Pyrex dishes.

Read the insert in the box and follow all directions closely. I'm also happy to help you in the Creative Green Living Tribe on Facebook.


2) LeadCheck Swabs are designed to test positive at only 600PPM

LeadCheck swabs are really designed to test for leaded house paint. 

The level the federal government of the United States of America has set for a paint to be considered "lead paint" is 600 PPM.

The level of lead that both I and Lead Safe Mama refer to as "the level of concern" for household items is only 90 PPM (this is the guideline set by the Consumer Product Safety Commission for items intended for children).

So even if you are testing the right kind of thing with your Lead Check Swab, if it contains 550 PPM (610% more lead than the maximum amount allowed by the CPSC for children's items!), your swab will not turn pink or red even if the item is leaded.

In general, a good rule of thumb for testing your vintage Pyrex (or other items) for lead is that if the swab turns red, it DEFINITELY has lead.

If the swab does NOT turn red, it still might have lead and further investigation is needed.

Do not make the assumption that a negative LeadCheck Swab means your item is lead safe.

Lead Safe Vintage Pyrex Alternatives

Since this post was originally published in 2015, a company called Vintage Charm has created a line of vintage Pyrex inspired bowls and some of them are lead and cadmium free! 

This particular design is inspired by the vintage Pyrex Butterprint design and has tested "non-detect" for lead and cadmium (meaning the machine could not find lead or cadmium). 

Not all of their designs are lead and cadmium free, but this particular pattern is and I own these bowls myself. Buy them on Amazon here: Vintage Pyrex "Butterprint" Inspired Bowls

Inspired by Vintage Pyrex - butterprint inspired bowls

What about that Snopes article?

Snopes fascinatingly tried to debunk a previous version of this article in 2016 but failed. 

Click here to read more about my response to Snopes and how they missed the key piece of information they needed in order to cover this issue accurately.


Carissa Bonham

About the Author:

Carissa Bonham is a lifelong crafter and mom of two creative boys. The owner and lead writer at Creative Green Living, she won the Craftys Award for the "Best Craft Blogger" category in 2016 and the ShiftCon award for "Best DIY Blogger" in 2018.

Her goal is to empower families to make easy projects and healthier choices that are beautiful and delicious! She is also the author of the hardcover cookbook, Beautiful Smoothie Bowls (Skyhorse, 2017) and Proven Techniques for Keeping Healthy Chickens (Skyhorse, 2018). 

Her projects have been featured in magazines like Kids Crafts 1-2-3, Capper's Farmer and Urban Farm Magazine. Follow her on Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter or join the Creative Green Living Tribe.

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Sours: https://www.creativegreenliving.com/2015/10/how-bad-is-lead-in-vintage-pyrex.html

Collector Edition Glass Vintage bowl 2,5 L

Discover the Collector Edition, iconic Pyrex® products revisited for the brand’s centenary! The vintage bowls’ functional design with a handle and a spout allow a better handling while preparing fabulous dishes.

Key features:
- Glass transparency allows you to easily check on your meal without removing the lid
- 2 side handles for a better grip, which can also be used as pouring spouts
- Elegant and clean design with our 100 year logo engraved on its base

The advantages of Pyrex® borosilicate glass:
- Supports extreme temperatures from -40 ° C to + 300 ° C
- Thermal shock resistant up to 220 ° C: Pyrex glass can go directly from the freezer at a temperature of - 20 ° C into the oven at a temperature of 200 ° C
- BPA free, hygienic material that doesn't retain stains or odors
- Scratch resistant

It is the manufacture of borosilicate glass that gives the Pyrex® brand its reputation in the field of French manufacture since 1922.
In October 2017, the brand was awarded the label, Origine France Garantie, for all its ranges of pressed borosilicate glass.

Founded in 1915, the Pyrex® brand has always anticipated the latest trends in cookware and acknowledged every single need in kitchen households. Throughout the years they came up with new ideas that offer a complete solution to all cookware requirements from preparation, to baking and storing.
By creating revolutionary products, Pyrex® has become the ideal kitchen partner while helping millions of households achieve the perfect meals. Today, the Pyrex® brand reinvents itself (by getting a new look)! It starts today with you, in your kitchen, with healthy, fresh products ... an invitation to create your own recipe. Pyrex® is a registered trademark owned by Corning Incorporated and used under license by International Cookware.

Sours: https://www.pyrex.eu/products/collector-edition-glass-vintage-bowl-2-5-l
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Federal glass refrigerator dishes are antique glass dishes with lids made by the Federal glass company between 1900-1980 in Ohio. In this post you’ll learn about the Federal Glass Company and where to buy vintage glass pieces online.

Vintage small 4

A few years ago for my birthday my mom sent me the cute little vintage glass dish above. After doing some research and learning about federal glass I’ve come to love my little refrigerator dishes and have even collected a few more in different sizes.

Who is the Federal Glass Company?

All of these pieces were made by the Federal Glass Company that opened its doors in 1900 in Columbus Ohio.  

Federal Glass closed in 1980 after decades of making pressed glass or more commonly referred to as “depression” glass that they made through the 1920’s and on.    

The method of pressed glass was mass production and allowed the company to make large quantities and sell at a reasonable prices through the depression.

What are vintage glass refrigerator dishes used for?

 At first I didn’t quite know what I would do with my cute little glass lidded dish but I quickly realized it was great for many things- including jelly or jam and lately I’ve been using it for sliced lemons.  

You can only imagine that before the wide use of plastics in the 1960’s these lidded glass dishes were used as the depression era Tupperware.   

Using them today is a little tricky since we know they are not air tight so food will not last as long in them as they do in other containers.

I often use them when I have guests over and want to have a pretty dish to put out on the table or counter.   

Is federal glass oven safe? No, probably not. Since the original intent of these dishes was not for the oven and through my research I can’t find any source saying that they are oven safe I would say No.

We don’t know exactly what type of glass these are and what temperature they can withstand so to be safe, keep them in the refrigerator or on the counter.  

How do you know if a glass piece is from Federal Glass? 

  • Pressed Logo- Most Federal Glass pieces bear their logo which is an F inside of shield, usually on the bottom of the piece. The exception is refrigerator dishes! I’m guessing that because these pieces were less expensive than their tumblers or plate sets that they didn’t put the seal on them.
  • Seam- Federal’s method for making glass pieces was to press the glass in molds and all the authentic vintage pieces have a seam. The seam is from where the two sides were molded together. Newer reproductions will not have this seam. Another exception for the refrigerator dishes, they don’t have seams!
  • Bubbles in the glass- When the glass was poured into the molds sometimes air would be trapped and bubbles would form. Many of the Federal glass company’s pieces have a few bubbles in the glass.
  • Chips and wear- Especially these refrigerator dishes were made to be used. They are typically pretty thick glass and might have a chip or two in them from being used for decades.

 

Where can I find vintage glass refrigerator dishes with lids?

The best places to find Federal Glass refrigerator dishes online are Etsy and Ebay. Because these are unique items and they are bought and sold frequently the best way to find them is to search Etsy and Ebay. Search for “Federal Glass Refrigerator Dishes” to see what’s for sale now. 

Are vintage refrigerator dishes expensive or valuable? Typically No. These pieces were mass produced and you can find them at affordable prices between $10-$30. The Federal Glass company was known for under pricing their competition so we still reap the benefits of that today!

Originally refrigerator dishes were sold in sets of 4, One large 8″ square, 2 small 4″ squares and 1 medium 4″ x 8″ rectangle. If you find a full set together you’ll probably be looking at $50-$60 to purchase the set.

What patterns and colors were federal glass refrigerator dishes made in?

From what I can tell these vintage glass lidded containers were made in clear, amber, green and pink. The pink is the most rare and the most expensive if you find it. The patterns I have seen are the ribbed sides and top, vegetable & fruit patterns on the lids and knobs on the lids. 

 

Different styles of federal glass refrigerator dishes

 

The picture above shows the variety I found online. I don’t have direct links because these pieces will all be sold in a matter of months. The best thing to do is search on Etsy and Ebay and see what’s currently available. 

 

Do you collect refrigerator dishes? I’d love to hear about it in the comments! Tag me on Instagram (@handmadeintheheartland) or facebook and show me a pic!

 

Sours: https://www.handmadeintheheartland.com/collecting-federal-glass-refrigerator-dishes/
CADEAUX AT THE CHATEAU \u0026 IN LONDON!

Old-Fashioned Glassware Terms to Know

Comport and Compote

The terms comport, and compote are sometimes used interchangeably along with the Italian word “tazza.” But are they the same thing?

A comport is often shaped like a large, albeit flatter, sherbet dish (see below for shape reference) and they are used for holding food. Some are a bit flatter in shape, like a small rimmed plate sitting on a pedestal base. 

How does a compote differ? The origin of the word comport actually is the 16th-century variation of compote, so they are indeed connected. Some folks maintain that a compote will have a lid whereas a comport doesn't, but that's not always the case. Some original catalogs issued by glassware manufacturers show pieces identified as compotes without lids. Compotes do vary in shape, however, to look somewhat like vases or candy dishes and comports are usually more bowl or saucer-like in appearance as shown here.

A tazza is essentially a shallow stemmed, footed vase or cup as well. They can be purely decorative, though, and may be made of materials not intended or safe for use with food. 

Note that covered footed bowls the size of sherbet dishes were sometimes sold as powder jars in depression glass patterns. These shouldn’t be confused with larger lidded compotes. 

Sours: https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/old-fashioned-glassware-terms-4046546

Bowls with glass lids vintage

Collector Edition Glass Vintage bowl 2,5 L

Discover the Collector Edition, iconic Pyrex® products revisited for the brand’s centenary! The vintage bowls’ functional design with a handle and a spout allow a better handling while preparing fabulous dishes.

Key features:
- Glass transparency allows you to easily check on your meal without removing the lid
- 2 side handles for a better grip, which can also be used as pouring spouts
- Elegant and clean design with our 100 year logo engraved on its base

The advantages of Pyrex® borosilicate glass:
- Supports extreme temperatures from -40 ° C to + 300 ° C
- Thermal shock resistant up to 220 ° C: Pyrex glass can go directly from the freezer at a temperature of - 20 ° C into the oven at a temperature of 200 ° C
- BPA free, hygienic material that doesn't retain stains or odors
- Scratch resistant

It is the manufacture of borosilicate glass that gives the Pyrex® brand its reputation in the field of French manufacture since 1922.
In October 2017, the brand was awarded the label, Origine France Garantie, for all its ranges of pressed borosilicate glass.

Founded in 1915, the Pyrex® brand has always anticipated the latest trends in cookware and acknowledged every single need in kitchen households. Throughout the years they came up with new ideas that offer a complete solution to all cookware requirements from preparation, to baking and storing.
By creating revolutionary products, Pyrex® has become the ideal kitchen partner while helping millions of households achieve the perfect meals. Today, the Pyrex® brand reinvents itself (by getting a new look)! It starts today with you, in your kitchen, with healthy, fresh products ... an invitation to create your own recipe. Pyrex® is a registered trademark owned by Corning Incorporated and used under license by International Cookware.

Sours: https://pyrex.co.uk/products/collector-edition-glass-vintage-bowl-2-5-l
VINTAGE PYREX COLLECTION and Glassware - Federal - Fire King

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Scratched his fist, silently turned around and left.

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