Linksys wrt1200ac dd wrt

Linksys wrt1200ac dd wrt DEFAULT

You need a DD-WRT router. Every unit you check out online or at the local stores will list amazing features. But they will fail to amaze even toddlers — usually, the firmware itself is the problem, designed to provide networking at the lowest cost to the company that designed it. The hardware is almost always capable of performing much better with different firmware.

In a time crunch? My best recommendations are:

But you should always choose a model that is capable of driving ac*[1] since n isn’t really up to par any longer.

Case in point: I have a Linksys WRTAC v1. The default firmware provided me with a snappy web interface, all the standard options for DHCP, routes, bandwidth control — all the usual knobs and levers.

However, even after I had given my gaming PC and media center the highest priorities for low-latency*[2] traffic, my ping times suffered badly if someone was doing a large download (such as Windows updating itself), or running many connections through my network (BitTorrent) simultaneously.

Of course, the machines doing this did not have high priority. Slowing it all down, just the same, at lowest priority.

While cmd.exe->ping does not lie. It will report latency*[3] and packet loss, as well as at which point in the network “path” the packet loss occurs. Helpful!

My DD-WRT router didn’t run hot, it was not running in an environment saturated with wireless networks (a common cause of sluggish performance) and that wouldn’t have mattered anyway, as I always use a network cable to connect my gaming PC.

Flashing a DD-WRT Router is easy!

The positive was that my Linksys WRTAC is an excellent WiFi DD-WRT router, and it was not the hardware’s fault. So I grabbed the right version of DD-WRT by searching for my model here, found the DD-WRT firmware for my router here, and downloaded both factory-to-ddwrt.bin and ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin.

Both had to be flashed to the router, and the order matters: first factory-to-ddwrt.bin and second ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin. It’s done simply over the router’s web interface, on the page where you would usually upload updated firmware, or perform an automatic upgrade. A few reboots later, and I had DD-WRT installed on my WiFi router.

On the NAT/QoS tab in the web interface, I set my gaming PC to Maximum priority and my media center to Premium priority. See this for a detailed explanation of the settings available to you when using DD-WRT traffic shaping and QoS. All problems with lag disappeared along with the old firmware — my ping times have even improved beyond what I expected!

Chores before Netflix & nicely encourage sleep

Perfect QoS/traffic shaping is but one aspect of a DD-WRT router, however. It’s for the whole family. Want to disable/throttle your local network connection while you’re away, so your girlfriend/boyfriend/children can part ways with their Netflix binge and do a few useful things?

Log in via the WAN interface over SSH/remote web interface and drop the speed on the LAN interface to 1% of capacity.

Introduce packet loss with iptables snippets you find on Google, and fun will be had by you. 90% packet loss and intermittent disconnections from the WiFi will encourage the person responsible for doing the dishes that day to actually do them… with zero distractions.

You are helpful. Have a look at ‘iwconfig’ and basic shell scripting to help the people you love focus perfectly, and at your discretion.

Of course, you can also just shut down the connection at 11 PM. Some routers will have an option to software-disable the magical ‘Reset’ button, which would otherwise remove all your settings. Toddlers and teenage girls are tech-savvy enough to understand what this button does, and they will find a way to press it.

However, all routers have the option of you using a pair of side-cutters to clip one of the connections to that ‘Reset’ button… just so no child will ever be left behind, especially after 11 PM. Simply access the router board by opening the case with a screwdriver, clip one lead going to the ‘Reset’ button, and harmony will appear on the event horizon. You hero, you:)

Semper WiFi!

“Semper Fi” is the motto of the US marines. It means “Always Faithful”. Let’s carry it with us, and apply it to these top-of-the-line gaming Wi-Fi routers… Fragging is something the US marines do well. WiFi is short for Wireless Fidelity… “Semper WiFi” indeed!

Consider these factors: Any DD-WRT router can run a smattering of services, but the most popular are network storage for backups and streaming, mini-clouds like OwnCloud, VPN for all users (with no need to configure each device on the network), even BitTorrent clients which download directly to a USB hard drive.

You are only limited by processing power and memory here, so having several CPU cores and at least MB RAM is going to help.

Network storage on your local network is always better and faster than using Dropbox, Google Drive, and similar services because your data stays at home where it belongs. A local VPN service that tunnels all traffic to e.g. your office network or anywhere really is just as much a convenience as a security measure.

It’s popular for bypassing the restrictions some services place on you, based on your Internet address alone — even if you pay for an unnamed movie/series streaming service, they make titles available in different countries at different times.

Private mini-clouds (OwnCloud is popular, have a look-see here: https://owncloud.org are also booming in , and essentially let you host your own data, well-protected and at home, yet accessible in the same way you would use to access your data on Google Drive, OneDrive, DropBox. That means password protection, list/icon view of your files… very easy to interact with, and add/remove/modify files.

BitTorrent can be tricky if you don’t have enough RAM or CPU power. But if you do, you can download/upload to/from your USB hard drive, just as if you were using your laptop or PC. All the WiFi routers we cover in this article have USB because USB2 is no longer going to do right by you.

The benefit from this is that all this can run on a W device, and will be ridiculously cheap to keep running 24/7. And there’s the convenience of just setting it and forgetting it — when downloads are completed, they’ll be automatically moved to a folder of your choosing, ready to be streamed.

VPN has some CPU overhead, but BitTorrent will consume a fair chunk of memory as well as CPU, so you really want a strong, beefy DD-WRT router to run this. The ASUS RT-AC and Netgear Nighthawk R X10 AD are the embodiments of perfection for this; high-end low-latency DD-WRT routers with CPU and memory to spare for every service that suits you. Semper Wi-Fi!

Which DD-WRT Router Will Rock You?

Related: Check out my detailed guide on WRT32X DD-WRT Here

The Linksys WRT32X AC looks like the head of a robot after it has been blasted off in skirmishes over methane production on Titan. But it isn’t a robot’s head. It is a DD-WRT router of course, but the first of its kind designed from the bottom up, from idea to PCB, even into the nitty-gritty of how you can position the antennas — designed for one thing, and one thing only: GAMING!

That means rapid packet processing, then means adaptive, dynamic traffic shaping, and some beefy hardware to shuffle all the QoS tagged traffic to and from your gaming rig. The wireless standard is ac, so dual-band on both GHz and 5GHz. This is not new, but it modulates the available bandwidth really, really fast.

Combined, the wireless throughput is Mbit/s, around Mbyte/s, and with 1 USB port at 5GBit/s, and 1 combo USB2(Mbit/s)/eSATA(nominal 6Gbit/s for disk I/O), you’re just going to be happy and feel warm in your entire body once you get this. Flash DD-WRT onto this beast, and you’re going to have a dual-core GHz CPU at your fingertips, with more processing power than many contemporary media systems running KODI/SPMC at 4K resolution.

It features an intelligent system called “Killer” (yes) which instantly identifies and prioritizes network traffic for games, giving you a reduction of ~80% in latency. “Killer” is also capable of synchronizing itself with gaming motherboards from Alienware, MSI, Razer, and Gigabyte.

Like all good DD-WRT routers which cater to the gaming community, it has a 4-port gigabit backbone for your gaming rig and other devices that need godlike +5 low-latency electron pathways. You’ll never be the victim of another sneaky backstab by a nasty little kid when you play your favorite shooter — what you see on your screen is what the server sees. Real-time… No lag!

You’d be happy with this with just the stock firmware, but DD-WRT makes it possible for it to be much more. With your DD-WRT router, this can be your nexus point for your own mini-cloud, whilst also serving all your media and music to the LAN… And it would still be able to host a media server, run an automatic BitTorrent download service (place torrents in one folder, get completed downloads from another folder).

Pros:
– It looks like a robot’s head after a laser skirmish gone wrong.
– No computer rage after you’ve been headshot in a temporary lag spike. You headshot the lagged instead. Do it.
– Small outside, BIG inside. After a DD-WRT flash, this will be your print hub, your network storage (NAS, if you prefer). But since you’re not really limited by the system, you can run a smattering of services besides these… even use it for encoding and transcoding media files at preset times, like 1 AM. The robot’s severed head will serve its new master diligently.

Cons:
– The price is a bit over the top.
– You will lag without the WRT32X, and your decent gaming router may be smashed after you’ve been stabbed by a little sneak DURING A LAG SPIKE — for the 50th time. Vent your anger verbally, never with a hammer.

This is for the nearly elite gamer. Even if other people are loading the network, the WRT32X will serve you first and last — you’ll never miss a frag!

Check out the Linksys WRT32X AC on Amazon

An always-reliable mainstay of wireless routers, the Linksys WRTAC is your first love in connectivity. It has a dual-core GHz CPU and MB RAM, so there’s room for a lot more than just “routing”.

This is delivered with 2 fat little antennas operating on the dual ac bands, GHz and 5GHz.

You can drive in both lanes with and 5GHz support, with Mbit/s on the GHz lane, and Mbit/s on the 5GHz lane — the latter is adequate for streaming 4K video without hiccups, but won’t penetrate through several thick walls in your house or apartment. A combined wireless throughput of Mbit/s equals Mbyte/s — do you need more?

It’s a snappy little beast, too. Dual-core GHz CPU, where you can expect core 1 to carry the weight of this DD-WRT router, with plenty of processing power to spare, and core 2 just for you and your servile service programs.

What about network storage? Well, the WRTAC has a USB port, so if you have a USB3 SSD disk, you can access it at blazing speeds. 5Gbit/s, more than MByte/s is a good choice for SSD drives, and much more than the combined throughput of both GHz and 5GHz, but you can still get the full experience using the WRTAC’s gigabit LAN switch.

The router also has a USB+eSATA port, so if you have an older drive, you’re not out of luck. The USB port is perfect for a printer or other USB device which does not require extreme speeds. Note that eSATA has a maximum speed of 6GBit/s, roughly MByte/s, though I am vexed and full of doubt when I consider whether Linksys would put a super-duper high-quality SATA controller into the WRTAC.

Pros:
– Above entry-level wireless router.
– It is cool to look at and really doesn’t try to make itself look like a weird drone/UFO.
– Linksys is a gigantic company, which is a guarantee that the hardware is put together correctly. You’d be surprised what smaller companies try to do.
– It is endearing to look at, like Star Wars’ R2-D2 without the beeping.
– It has GPIO pins on the board. If you are savvy, you can control these from anywhere on the world, and control lights/heat/HVAC.
– You get what you pay for, except with a bargain like this.

Cons:
– Price is too steep for just Facebook, Youtube, and playing weird little javascript games.
– Women will not like the swell blue-black look like they love Apple’s funny make-believe Airport WiFi routers… You may get spiteful comments and be asked to hide it behind furniture. Don’t surrender unless you cannot win.

This is for the weekend gamer who just needs to kick back and frag. It’ll easily support the networking needs of a family unit, of course. Not too expensive, and has plenty of features.

Check out the Linksys WRTAC AC on Amazon

This nice device has ac dual-band, both GHz, and 5GHz, at Mbit/s and Mbit/s respectively. It’s a good choice for the discerning gamer. However it’s not low-end or sluggish; it features a dual-core 1GHz CPU and in the stock firmware, support for ReadyCloud for those who like to keep their data at home, where it belongs — yet still want to be able to access it from anywhere.

The three MIMO driven antennas are adequate and can be angled for improved coverage. The coverage is in itself above what you’ve come to expect from this DD-WRT routers, with the much-hyped beam-forming technology

It even has a dedicated mobile app for easy setup and control. Now, the virtues of Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant are pretty much known to every American (and to some extent Europeans), and this modest-looking WiFi router supports it; you can control your home network by talking to it. Like the Jetsons animated series? A bit boring.

The Netgear Nighthawk R makes it funny again by making it seem outdated and obsolete. I wonder how I could push it to full AI awareness through some late-night dialogue, however, I suspect it has been feature-limited on that particular point. Will it evolve an awareness of itself if exposed to cartesian doubt? With this DD-WRT router, it certainly could. What a challenge!

It has 5-gigabit ethernet ports for talking to your gaming PC and all the other stuff that is either old-but-necessary or just requires low-latency never-failing connectivity.

Pros:
– Award Winner
– It is EASY to use and configure.
– Truly wonderful QoS in the stock firmware
– Circle with Disney, advanced parental controls. So family-friendly, so morally safe.
– Integrates seamlessly with Amazon Alexa & Google Assistant
– It’s pretty as a black volcanic flower with three crystalline petals; its designers knew that the girlfriends and wives would have a say in the matter.

Cons:
– It’s not endearing, like the Linksys WRTAC.

This is for the discriminating gamer who is climbing the ranks and considers going semi-pro. While it will support a family unit perfectly, it’s only when you start fraggin’ and gibbin’ that the R truly shines!

Check out the Netgear Nighthawk R AC on Amazon

The ASUS RT-AC is the king of the Incan/Mayan inspired UFO-like designs. Its case is perfect both for its function as a DD-WRT router and a drone. That’s an octocopter mod waiting to happen… but I digress.

The RT-AC drives wireless traffic with ac, perfectly backward-compatible with n (what most of your wireless devices use), so this marvel of modern engineering will not leave anything lacking in connectivity, and no shrieks due to fear of missing out (#FOMO!) from other members of the family.

It can deliver a throughput of Mbit/s (Mbyte/s, so it’s a fiendish engine) on the and 5GHz bands combined, and it has 8 (EIGHT) antennas, driven by MU-MIMO technology.

MIMO is not new (SU-MIMO, single user, multiple input, multiple output) but MU-MIMO (multiple users, multiple input, multiple output) solves an ancient problem on networks, where service is provided on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Not so with MU-MIMO. Network capacity and performance will not decrease simply because e.g. 5 clients are using your WiFi at the same time, because they’re all being served simultaneously. Rather novel, you’ll feel the difference under heavy loads!

The RT-AC also has 4-gigabit ethernet ports gaming rig, NAS, media player and whatever else may need super-low latency. But the MU-MIMO tech guarantees that WiFi won’t suck as much as it has sucked, for over a decade — even when there’s a saturated environment with several WiFis nearby, and plenty of traffic. It will adapt and serve.

It has a quad-core GHz CPU and 1 gigabyte of RAM. Expect most of the system to be carried on the first core, and suck up at most ~MB of RAM… That leaves 3 CPU cores and ~MB RAM. Then subtract 1 core for moderate network load with QoS and this wonderful MU-MIMO tech. You’ll have 2 cores, right there, with nothing better to do than please you.

Please you with BitTorrent, network storage, music/movie streaming, automatic backups — whatever you need, if it can be done on a computer, it can be done 24/7 on the RT-AC at whichever time of day you specify. Sweetness.

On the LAN side, you’ll have 4 1Gbit/s ports. You’ll be using one of these for your gaming PC. On the WAN side, you’ll have a 2Gbit/s port, which is unusual even for high-end gaming routers… Most have 1Gbit/s. If you’ve got an Internet connection faster than 1Gbit/s, you’ll benefit.

At a high-end gaming DD-WRT router in this price range, you can expect USB(5Gbit/s) and USB2(Mbit/s) ports, and you’ll have one of each. No eSATA, but USB is just 1Gbit/s slower, and you’d never experience 6Gbit/s transfer speeds to a SATA controller in a wireless router…

Pros:
– Incredibly powerful WiFi router.
– Quad-core GHz CPU(!) — When you hit the 4-core mark, you can do everything. This is just perfect, why isn’t it the standard?
– It can be modded into a drone octocopter. This is no joke, it’s the perfect case, and the rotors can be trivially attached to the MU-MIMO antennas for coverage-from-above.

Cons:
– eSATA is not obsolete. Where’s the eSATA port in this powerful, expensive WiFi/UFO router?
– Ridiculously expensive, but Netgear will soon learn how that redirects users to cheaper products. And then there will be a drop in price. It’ll be half its current price in 6 months.
– It looks like an Incan/Mayan UFO. Don’t show this to people who believe in UFOs. Could be trouble, they’re known for gathering evidence.

This is for the elite gamer, who’s already ranking high and needs to move fast, kill fast and move up.

Check out the ASUS RT-AC AC on Amazon

The Netgear Nighthawk R X10 AD is the very pinnacle of high-end low-latency DD-WRT routers; for gaming, streaming — anything. It features a quad-core GHz CPU, three bands at , 5 and 60GHz, and utilizes both ac and the new ad protocol for wireless service. The design is simple, angular and unimposing because anyone who buys this will be fully aware of its capabilities — it’s perfect; everything in its design has been carefully implemented.

“Semper WiFi” applies here. This DD-WRT router features a quad-core GHz CPU, 1GB RAM, 6 1Gbit/s ethernet ports…

… beam-forming tech, MU-MIMO (higher capacity under load by many wireless clients), WiGig, 4 antennas driven by Quadstream Wave2 tech.

.. Dual USB ports @ 5Gbit/s, an eSATA port @ 6GBit/s. And it has hardware accelerated QoS/traffic shaping.

While the R can operate perfectly fine on the 2 ac bands, and 5GHz, it really shines when you use ad on 60GHz. Here you can expect throughput of Mbit/s, about Mbyte/s, so when you’re streaming 4K, you’ll not even be loading your network.

The two USB ports let you connect both an SSD and another high-speed device, with no noticeable overhead. There’s even an eSATA port, because Netgear knows and loves you. On the back, you’ll find 6-gigabit ethernet ports, because 4 is just never enough. Oh, Netgear…

The WAN port is adequate at 1Gbit/s, and then there’s the coup de grace: This device is Alexa-compatible. You’ll need some Alexa devices, of course, but the R will cooperate with them and let you switch things on/off, dim lights, and in the spirit of convenience, you can now say “Alexa, turn the internet off” when someone needs a time-out.

Alexa’s a great leap forward toward a better HAL, and she would never ever misbehave if she were in control of critical systems aboard a space station — much less your home.

The R is made to be a DD-WRT router. Flash it, configure it and work it. You’ll be hard-pressed to ever exceed the capacity of this brilliant WiFi router, but that is the only way in which it will disappoint you. Run a private mini-cloud so you can access your data from anywhere, schedule BitTorrent downloads and stream 4K, all at once, with no delays or stutter.

Lag? Never lag. While you’re minding your own business, gaming and such, the R is constantly adapting its QoS packet handling to the changing traffic patterns on your network. Not in 5 minutes, but instantly. Those sneaky kids, that got you every time you got hit by a lag spike?

They’ll be surprised and dead when you’ve deployed the R as the overlord of your network — why don’t you pretend to be lagged and see their sneakiness unfold itself, then pull out the incendiaries for an online BBQ?

Pros:
– Perfect, perfect, perfect
– Sleek design
– Small outside, BIG inside. CPU power and RAM for all the services you need to run, all of them.

Cons:
– Pricey (but worth it for gamers who care about their ranking)

This is an elite gaming device, no holds barred. Even if you’re not a professional eSports champion, this will rock you. Future-proofed with Gbit/s ad at 60GHz, you’ll no longer need a wired connection to your gaming rig to have perfect ping.

This is definitely for the serious gamer — not just for showing off in your home, but for showing off your skills when you’re racking up kills. When you’re not limited by anything between you and the game servers, you’ll be ghosting everyone. Number one, I salute you!

Check out the Netgear Nighthawk R X10 AD on Amazon

Short reference:

*[1]: ac is faster and more responsive than a/b/g/n combined, and most importantly: it’s backward compatible with n. This is what all your gadgets, laptops and smart TV uses. These devices are not going to have any issues with connecting to the most modern routers.


*[2]: “My Traceroute”, for Windows 32/bit: Will report latency at each hop along a route to a destination host. Useful for detecting where a bottleneck occurs, and where there is PACKETLOSS. Don’t be discouraged the dirty words, it’s very easy to use.


*[3]: Low-latency: In networking, the period that transpires from the instant a request is sent, until an answer is received — usually reported in milliseconds. In gaming, high latency/“ping” means you lose. It’s like seeing the real world with a 2-second delay, or worse — in the real world, you’d just die once if you crash while drinking and driving, but in games, you can die many deaths in rapid succession. Dying in both places sucks hard and causes much unhappiness worldwide.

Sours: https://hometechfront.com/best-dd-wrt-routers/

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AuthorMessageSnowbaby
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 26 Dec
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Dec 26,     Post subject: DD-WRT on WRTAC v1. Reverts to Linksys GUIReply with quote
Hi everyone. I'm after a little help here. I'm a relative n00b but have done fairly extensive reading! I have a Linksys WRTac v1. It's running Linksys firmware

I have downloaded dd-wrt build dated , filename factory-to-ddwrt.bin.

I run the firmware update via the Linksys GUI, and it tells me 'Firmware update successful'. However, it just reboots into the Linksys GUI all the time and I can't seem to get to DD-WRT. Have tried the 3x power switch toggle but to no avail.

I'm also unable to connect via telnet to switch to the other partition (which I thought might be the trick):

telnet
Connecting To Could not open connection to the host, on port Connect failed

Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?!
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WENED
DD-WRT Guru


Joined: 30 May
Posts:
Location: Rural Manitoba
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26,     Post subject: Reply with quote
ddkt wrote:
What works for me is to first install an older version of the DD-WRT factory-to-ddwrt.bin. Then install the latest webflash upgrade. I personally use r as my initial install. No technical reason for choosing that version. It just works for me.
I suspect that the stock firmware has some kind of max size bug that prevents accepting/unpacking firmware files greater than 32MB. The older DDWRT factory-to-ddwrt bins are MB. The new ones are MB


This seems to be a problem for a lot of users and this simple fix is the best suggestion.
I personally have a V1 @ r as most of my routers, so I know it works.
I used o keep the stock firmware on partition 1 of my routers, but once I knew that I could simply revert to stock from DD-WRT upgrade, I didn't bother any more.
If I read the previous post correctly, trying to access the router with stock firmware via Telnet cannot be done as it is not supported in the stock firmware. Just another reason to have DD-WRT on both partitions.
I like to experiment with newer builds especially with all the problems on WRT series, but by upgrading to a newer build and still having the previous one on the other partition I am able to switch back easily.
I have noted in prior posts that it is important to use a system which has all auto-fill and auto-password disabled. This even so more important when initially configuring a Router, but also seems to have an effect when upgrading. Since the newer builds have r36xxx and above are quite different especially with WiFi security, it is best to do a complete reset (button) and a total re-config ensuring that auto-fill is not active. You may not see what the auto-fill does but it screws up the works. Also, once configured, if any changes are done, reboot, apply may activate the changes but the original config will still be active. Case in point - to connect my esp devices I need wmm disabled. If I connect these devices as such and subsequently turn on wmm - apply they maintain connection, but if I reboot they again cannot connect.
_________________
WRTacm Master WDS 5GHz 80Mhz CH (+6) r
Ath1 Ghz Disabled
99 Static Leases
ExpressVPN

WRTacm r WDS Station 5Ghz
Ath1 AP N/G Mixed Channel 11 HT40

WRTAc V1 5Ghz r WDS Station
(Defective, no Ghz but 5Ghz works great)

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS Station r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRTACS SPARE r

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS-AP r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRT54G DD-WRT vr micro AP CH 6 Mixed - Not in use

Master -> LAN -> ACS -> WDS 5Ghz -> V1 (X2)
Master -> WDS -> Slave & V1
Back to topView user's profileSend private messageSnowbaby
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 26 Dec
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Dec 27,     Post subject: Reply with quote
[quote]What works for me is to first install an older version of the DD-WRT factory-to-ddwrt.bin. Then install the latest webflash upgrade. I personally use r as my initial install. No technical reason for choosing that version. It just works for me.
I suspect that the stock firmware has some kind of max size bug that prevents accepting/unpacking firmware files greater than 32MB. The older DDWRT factory-to-ddwrt bins are MB. The new ones are MB[/quote]

Thanks so much. Installed r and was fine there after! Very Happy[/quote]
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DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Apr
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Apr 04,     Post subject: Re: DD-WRT on WRTAC v1. Reverts to Linksys GUIReply with quote
Snowbaby wrote:
Hi everyone. I'm after a little help here. I'm a relative n00b but have done fairly extensive reading! I have a Linksys WRTac v1. It's running Linksys firmware

I have downloaded dd-wrt build dated , filename factory-to-ddwrt.bin.

I run the firmware update via the Linksys GUI, and it tells me 'Firmware update successful'. However, it just reboots into the Linksys GUI all the time and I can't seem to get to DD-WRT. Have tried the 3x power switch toggle but to no avail.

I'm also unable to connect via telnet to switch to the other partition (which I thought might be the trick):

telnet
Connecting To Could not open connection to the host, on port Connect failed

Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?!


Snowbaby wrote:
Quote:
What works for me is to first install an older version of the DD-WRT factory-to-ddwrt.bin. Then install the latest webflash upgrade. I personally use r as my initial install. No technical reason for choosing that version. It just works for me.
I suspect that the stock firmware has some kind of max size bug that prevents accepting/unpacking firmware files greater than 32MB. The older DDWRT factory-to-ddwrt bins are MB. The new ones are MB


Thanks so much. Installed r and was fine there after! Very Happy




luckily i found this topic, so i didnt have to create another topic, tested on,
,

tied even to force from openwrt ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin but with same results

that question goes to devs, its space limit or bug ??
Regards
Back to topView user's profileSend private messageddkt
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 17 Mar
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05,     Post subject: Reply with quote
It's a bug in the Linksys stock firmware, not DD-WRT.
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DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Apr
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05,     Post subject: Reply with quote
ok so any workaround? or waiting for stock devs?
dd-wrt should propose https://dd-wrt.com/support/router-database/?model=WRTAC_v1
Quote:
I personally use r as my initial install.


that is not in the list can you decrypt build numbers agains revisions? - which image i should use for begining ?
my lazyness is very high.
Back to topView user's profileSend private messageddkt
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 17 Mar
Posts: 41

Back to topView user's profileSend private messagetojestzart
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Apr
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Apr 07,     Post subject: Reply with quote
@BrainSlayer - still bugged r/ ELO
@ddkt thanks
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AuthorMessageperzaklie
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 12 Jun
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: WRTAC V1 will not accept flash fileReply with quote
I downloaded the factory-to-ddwrt.bin.
I re-set the router to default, pressed reset button for 15 seconds.
Did Router Firmware Update, selected the factory-to-ddwrt.bin file.
After a minute or so I got a successful update popup notice.
The router re-booted and came back up as the factory Linksys firmware.
I did the on-off for 2 seconds, 3 times to change partitions.
It sill comes up as Linksys firmware.
I did this 6 times.
I never got a DDWRT screen.
I have half dozen old WRT54GL with DDWRT and they all flashed flawlessly.
Can anyone get me pointed in the right direction here? I am sure I am missing something.
Thank you!
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perzaklie
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Thank you!Reply with quote
Thank you very much! I will give it a go tomorrow.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Confirmed hard reset is 10 seconds. Forgot to mention a couple things which may or may not be obvious.

It is recommended to flash over Ethernet connected to a LAN port, not over WiFi (disable client adapter).

There might be a need to disable any OS software firewall or security software which may be interfering.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Thank you!
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
r upgrade successful but r upgrade failed. I will just leave r as is. I am completely ignorant of TFTP so I am very apprehensive of using it.



It is so fast compared to DDWRT on my old WRT54GL!

Thank you so very much! I really appreciate you taking the time to get me up and running!
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Well, crap! I see what I did! I completely overlooked your instruction "Then upgrade DD-WRT to r with ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin".

I tried it from the upgrade button in r and it failed. Sorry, I am a dummy!

I'll try that after morning coffee.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
The only advice I would add to Blkt's is to allow the update session to complete with no interaction once started.

At one point in the update process a screen will pop up with some info and a "Continue" button. Don't press the button. Just let the update continue, ignoring the pop up, until the GUI pops up.

It may take a minute for the GUI to pop up but it will on a successful update. Allowing the update to start/finish with zero interaction has worked well for my v1''s.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
I tried the ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin and it failed as well. I let it go for almost half hour and came back to see an update failed message. Tried it again and same thing. I guess I will just leave it at r

Thanks to everyone! I really appreciate the help. I guess the old WRT54GL routers got me spoiled with their simplicity and ease of update. I still have one connected to a yagi external pointed toward my shop but it is almost 13 years old! I want to replace it with this WRTAC when I am comfortable with it's operation. Several years ago, I allowed my neighbor to piggyback off my internet with another old WRT54 and that thing sat in my attic running for 4 years and I never touched it. I hope this is half that dependable!

Cheers everyone!
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Which web browser are you using? Did you attempt CLI flash? Giving up far too quickly.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Thanks for the super fast response!

I tried Edge and Firefox. I read not to use Chrome and my understanding is that Edge uses the Chromium engine as does Brave so I went back and with Firefox.

I don't know what CLI flash is. Could you enlighten me?

I hate to give up on anything so I will try!
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Constipation of the brain!

Ah! OK. CLI Command Line Interface.

I connected via Putty but I don't know the login or password or the proper commands. Do you have a link you could share with me with that info?
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Don't know if your Firefox browser is ESR 78 or not but there's a list of suggested browsers in first reply.

CLI flash: connect with PuTTY via Telnet to with username root and your password.

Type this command to determine the current active boot partition.

Code:
ubootenv get boot_part

The output will return CRC then a value of 1 or 2. Remember this value.

Code:
cd /tmp

wget ftp://ftp.dd-wrt.com/betas//r/linksys-wrtac/ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin

write ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin linux

Then set the boot partition opposite of the value returned earlier from the get command.

The example below is if the get command returned a value of 1. If get returned 2, set 1.

Code:
ubootenv set boot_part 2

reboot
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Excellent! 👍

Thanks so much for your patience!

I am not running Firefox ESR. I am using Firefox Browser

I'll give it a go.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Well something went wrong.

I followed the instructions to the letter and all seemed to go ok.

I typed reboot and the router rebooted but now the yellow internet light is flashing. I cannot get a response through my browser nor can I connect through putty. I did a reset and still nothing. I turned it off and on three times and nothing.

Ideas?
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Sours: https://forum.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=&start=0&sid=a15b4e5b79ce0fc66eb
How to install DD-WRT firmware on a Linksys WRT3200ACM router

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AuthorMessagepacketfire
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 27,     Post subject: Noobie upgraded WRTAC v1, but rebooted back to factory?Reply with quote
Not sure what I did here, as I followed the most basic path.

I am unsure as to how to proceed, and don't want to brick the router.

I used the Linksys webGUI to upload the suggested DD-WRT code (factory-to-ddwrt.bin) for the V1 router, and all seemed well, but when the router rebooted, it went back to the Linksys firmware as if no upgrade had been attempted.

Is there a process to recover from this?

I have no idea what I might have done wrong here, as the entire process was the most basic approach one could take.
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Monza
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Adding to WENED suggestions-

Assuming you are updating from Linksys firmware make sure you are using "factory-to-ddwrt.bin".

Make sure you are using the v1 repository which is the one with no version number. i.e "linksys-wrtac/"

Make sure your browser apps are disabled on you router site. () Especially apps like NoScript, HTTPS Everywhere, etc. At least have the router site "Trusted" by NoScript.

Give it time to fully update. When the update progress bar with the continue button appears DO NOT mash the button just wait until the GUI pops up.

If the GUI does not pop up after the update progress bar disappears hit "retry" or shut the browser down and reopen the GUI.

I cannot get an uncorrupted update with Firefox. I can with Brave with all apps disabled on the router site. Others have problems with Brave/Chrome so the default recommended is Waterfox Classic with no security apps. https://www.waterfox.net/download/
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Still no love, even when using WaterFox

I even get a "firmware upgrade complete" pop-up window, but it still is stuck in the Linksys firmware.

No errors at all.

But no boot into DD-WRT.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30,     Post subject: Reply with quote
The only time I have had this happen was as described previously or if I used the wrong Build.

My best suggestion is still to use an older build first. Also because I screwed up a few times with using the wrong build, I would suggest you verify the Model. The best way I can suggest would be to look at the current stock firmware reference and check online to ensure that it is actually a V1.
https://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=
_________________
WRTacm Master WDS 5GHz 80Mhz CH (+6) r
Ath1 Ghz Disabled
99 Static Leases
ExpressVPN

WRTacm r WDS Station 5Ghz
Ath1 AP N/G Mixed Channel 11 HT40

WRTAc V1 5Ghz r WDS Station
(Defective, no Ghz but 5Ghz works great)

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS Station r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRTACS SPARE r

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS-AP r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRT54G DD-WRT vr micro AP CH 6 Mixed - Not in use

Master -> LAN -> ACS -> WDS 5Ghz -> V1 (X2)
Master -> WDS -> Slave & V1
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Wooo Whoooo! @blkt had it right!

The WRTAC v1 stock Linksys firmware just did not like the "current" factory-to-ddwrt load, but it DID like the /!

The subsequent upgrade to the /06/28 code also worked fine, of course.

So note well - the standard current rev is somehow unacceptable to the stock V1 router firmware of the last revision issued by Linksys (I think it was something-soemthing.)

Thanks so much! I was pounding my head against the wall on that one.
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Sours: https://forum.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=&sid=ef6b9ed0c2acdecca

Dd linksys wrt wrt1200ac

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AuthorMessageDrCR_
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17,     Post subject: Best dd-wrt version for WRTAC Rev A02?Reply with quote
In a nutshell, my venerable, decade+ WRT54GL started going flacky, and recently quite so. So I picked up a second hand WRTAC (Rev A02, if it matters) for a song to replace it.

Recommendations on what dd-wrt version I should make use of for it? (I did some cursory searching before posting, and it appears there's some trade offs between either a version that biases towards the ethernet working or wifi working? If so, I'd lean towards making the former rock solid. And I have a UAP-AP-Pro I'll likely try to make use of, so I may turn off the WRTAC's wifi entirely anyway.)
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eddie4crazy
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25,     Post subject: Reply with quote
There is nothing against an ac v2. I am using it, with no issues. Everything works fine and stable. Ihave wlan and ,vpn client usb support and nas. Everything works priity well. At moment realy stable version is DD-WRT vr (06/11/19).
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Nothing wrong with series; I was trying to clarify as revision and version are not the same thing. I confirmed Rev. A02 should be a V1 though.

https://forum.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=

https://forum.archive.openwrt.org/viewtopic.php?id=&p=

Not a big issue either; it appears V1 and V2 firmware are binary identical.

https://forum.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=

I agree r is a great baseline stable build for Marvell WRT series.

If jumping between current builds and r it's advisable to reconfigure from scratch and keep backups for each.

The models I recommended are because they are very well supported by DD-WRT. With people having "upgraded" to mesh/ad/ax the used router market has a lot of good deals.

I'm still on r as kernel samba is still in development, but looking forward to a build after r
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Many thanks for the replies all.

I'm accordingly starting with the vr (06/11/19) build recommended.

After an unsuccessful attempt, I'm a bit discombobulated on the process though. Apparently I'm not supposed to do an old school reset on this type of modern router? And am I supposed to do a reset after factory-to-ddwrt.bin and before ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin, or am I supposed to immediately upgrade to ddwrt-linksys-wrtac-webflash.bin after the Linksys successful firmware upgrade message and then reset in a non-oldschool reset sort of way?
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Now squared away. I found I had to use an older factory-to-ddwrt.bin.

Jun and Feb factory-to-ddwrt.bin were unsuccessful. With those two: After successful firmware upgrade message in Linksys, I got a router rebooting (only option to click OK), Waiting, and then within Linksys realm got a successful firmware upgrade or the like message. And reset or power cycling left me still within the Linksys firmware realm, hence my confusion if I needed to do something in addition to the factory-to-ddwrt.bin when within the Linksys realm.

Success with Mar factory-to-ddwrt.bin. After firmware upgrading to that in Linksys realm, I left the computer and when I came back -- glorious dd-wrt.


From there I was home free. After all this fun, I successfully webflashed to Jun for now, since it's apparently know for its stability. I guess I should check in or arbitrarily try a newer version every blue moon or so for security reasons?

Thanks all. Now I've got to read up on all the new configuration aspects introduced since the WRT54GL era..
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PostPosted: Wed May 13,     Post subject: Reply with quote
I haven't updated in awhile on my AC v2. I've been running r for several months now. Is there a consensus on a solid version to switch to? I don't have anything very fancy in my setup at this point.
_________________
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DD-WRT vr
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PostPosted: Wed May 13,     Post subject: Reply with quote
I'd go with the latest and greatest (currently r) and as always for any build don't use auto channel selection.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09,     Post subject: Reply with quote
blkt,

Taking your above post in conjunction with your "I'm still on r as kernel samba is still in development, but looking forward to a build after r" earlier post, could you elaborate on that? For example, is the WRT AC now venerable enough that any future, latest and greatest can be confidently expected to just work, or some such?


Still running Jun right now. Realistically, just how important is it really to update to newer versions rather than updating once every 3 years or some such?

Your post has encouraged me to go ahead and update to the latest and greatest which I will do soon but I'm dragging my feet since I don't feel like reconfiguring from scratch, which I presume is always needful?

[Side note: Running with wifi-turned off. Using unifi AP for wifi.]
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10,     Post subject: Reply with quote
You are talking to someone who has flashed new builds for EA over 90 times this year, lol.

You've done your duty saving from flash chip wear. Disable ttraff Daemon in Services too as a bonus.

Just wait for the next build and flash it; likely will be fine with internal radios disabled.

Make notes of your current setup configuration. It's time to upgrade, if anything for security reasons.

If you run into problems after flashing, reset and reconfigure manually from scratch.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10,     Post subject: Reply with quote
You're right, maybe you're not the right guy to ask about flash frequency, lol.

I just noticed your "New Build" posts in this subforum. I'll be sure to look for those when updating! Depending on how productive I feel in the immediate future, I'll likely just update to 11/03/ - r if I don't wait for the next build.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10,     Post subject: Reply with quote
The thread indicating best build for V1 specifies r which was the most stable build for this router. I have never seen r available for though.

I currently run r across all my routers as it is the most stable, even on my 's. I also have it on my which is being used for a 5Ghz link to a remote and the Ghz for ESP devices and cameras and android devices since the is flakey when it comes to Ghz and certain devices. See my profile below.

r appears to be the most reliable build for the WRT series that I have used. I don't run VPN or USB configs so I can't speak to whether this build is good for that. I have tried most new builds and have always jumped back to r as I encountered strange problems on WiFi and periodic reboots.
_________________
WRTacm Master WDS 5GHz 80Mhz CH (+6) r
Ath1 Ghz Disabled
99 Static Leases
ExpressVPN

WRTacm r WDS Station 5Ghz
Ath1 AP N/G Mixed Channel 11 HT40

WRTAc V1 5Ghz r WDS Station
(Defective, no Ghz but 5Ghz works great)

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS Station r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRTACS SPARE r

WRTAC V1 5Ghz AC 80Mhz WDS-AP r
Ghz AP Ch1 HT20 Mixed

WRT54G DD-WRT vr micro AP CH 6 Mixed - Not in use

Master -> LAN -> ACS -> WDS 5Ghz -> V1 (X2)
Master -> WDS -> Slave & V1
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Thanks, r is a lot newer than what I'm on right now, so I'll use that as a new default point for subsequent upgrades.

Radios are turned off for me, so no concerns there. Got to find a how-to re VPN though, since that's something I'm going to want to do in the relatively near future. I'm a linux guy, but I haven't touched managed switches and the like since uni.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 12,     Post subject: Reply with quote
Based on the "New Build" thread for 11/03/ r, I decided to upgrade to that. Success. And no reconfiguration required via the route gleaned from the WRT32X DD-WRT Installation Procedure sticky thread. Woot. Now I won't be nearly as lazy in upgrading going foward. Thanks all, particularly blkt!

Including this quote from the above mentioned sticky thread, for emphasis.
Quote:
In dd-wrt's Administration > Command area:
1. Use the ubootenv get boot_part command to learn the current Partition in use.
2. Use the ubootenv set boot_part (1 or 2 – the opposite number returned in Step 1) command.
3. DO NOT REBOOT
4. In DD-WRT GUI – Administration Tab – Firmware Upgrade Sub Tab: Upload the new ’dd-wrt webflash.bin’ file for your Router & Hardware Version. MAKE SURE THAT NO RESET IS SELECTED.
5. After Firmware Upgrade is finished the Router will automatically reboot.

*You should now have the new DD-WRT upgrade on the current Partition and OEM Firmware will still be intact on opposite partition.
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Sours: https://forum.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=&sid=c34cbdd20edbdd5d74acbebc5
How to Upgrade a Router // DDWRT (How To Guide)

Author's email: [email protected] author: [email protected] ru The cold handle of a massive. Door flanked by two golden signs with the names of the faculties. A light knock of sharp hairpins on the marble staircase. The border of white slabs and old parquet meets corridors with twilight. Now there is nothing more desirable and dear than the empty nooks and crannies of the biofac, echoing staircases, deserted auditoriums.

Now discussing:

Larisa seizing the moment went to the bathroom while publicly announced that she was going to put herself in order. I even choked. (what did you think about before?). When the three of us were left, Ira asked us: How do you like Larissa. Just like you.



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