Jock itch rash pictures

Jock itch rash pictures DEFAULT

What to know about jock itch

Jock itch is an annoying and itchy rash common in people who sweat a lot, such as athletes. The rash is often found in the genital, buttock, and thigh regions.

Although uncomfortable, jock itch is not serious and can be treated and prevented very easily.

Jock itch is an infection caused by a mold like fungus or yeast. It causes a rash on the areas around the groin. The red, ring-shaped rash is very itchy and thrives in these warm, moist areas of the body. The rash is caused by the same fungus that causes athlete’s foot, tinea cruris.

Tinea is another name for the fungal infection known as ringworm. Because of this, jock itch may be referred to as ringworm of the groin. Ringworm also causes athlete’s foot and barber’s itch.

Like other tinea infections, jock itch is caused by an overgrowth of the tinea fungus. This fungus lives on the skin in small amounts, but can multiply and grow quickly in warm, moist areas.

Causes and risk factors

Jock itch is caused by a ringworm fungal infection. This fungus is highly contagious and can be spread easily from person to person through use of shared clothing and towels. The infection can also live on surfaces like exercise equipment, making it very easy to become infected.

The fungus that causes jock itch thrives in warm, moist environments. People with increased risk for jock itch are those who often spend a lot of time sweating due to exercise or their weight.

Other risk factors for developing jock itch include the following:

  • Gender: Men are more likely than women to develop jock itch
  • Weight: Overweight people have more skin folds, which are the best climate for fungal infections including jock itch to occur
  • Sweating profusely: If a person sweats a lot, their skin is more suited for fungus to grow
  • Age: Teenagers are more likely to develop jock itch
  • Wearing tight clothing and underwear: Tight fabrics trap moisture against skin and create a prime environment for fungus to grow
  • Having a weak immune system: People with weakened immune systems are to develop fungal infections like jock itch than others
  • Having diabetes: People with diabetes are more prone to skin infections including jock itch

Symptoms and diagnosis

Jock itch starts with a flat, red, itchy rash. This rash often first appears on the inner thighs.

The rash then spreads outward in a ring-like pattern. As the rash spreads, the center of the rash will often get somewhat better. The rash often develops a well-defined, red border that may include a line of blisters.

As the rash spreads, it may infect the thighs, groin, buttocks, and usually spares the scrotum.

Aside from the rash, other notable symptoms of jock itch include the following:

  • Burning, itching, or pain at the site of the rash
  • Scaling and flaking skin over the rash
  • A rash that may worsen with exercise and does not respond to anti-itch creams

Doctors can easily diagnose most cases of jock itch just by looking the rash. However, in some cases where the diagnosis is not as clear cut, a doctor may send a sample of the infected skin to a laboratory for closer examination.

When to see a doctor

Although jock itch is not a serious problem, a doctor should look at any persistent skin rash that develops, in order to rule out other serious conditions. A person with jock itch should also see a doctor if over-the-counter treatments do not work, or if the rash worsens.

Treatment and prevention

Jock itch is fairly easy to treat. Most cases respond to the over-the-counter treatments that are available. These treatments include antifungal creams, sprays, and lotions.

If the over-the-counter remedies do not work, a doctor may prescribe high-strength antifungal cream or antifungal pills.

Other treatments for jock itch involve managing the uncomfortable itching.

Lifestyle tips

Jock itch has a tendency to keep coming back, much like athlete’s foot and related fungal infections. Preventing jock itch in the first place with some easy changes can help to keep it at bay.

To reduce the risk of jock itch, following these tips can help:

  • Keeping the body clean.
  • Staying dry. Moisture creates an ideal environment for fungal infections to occur. Drying the inner thighs and groin area after showering is key.
  • Using powder to help absorb moisture after exercising.
  • Avoiding tight-fitting clothing and underwear. Tight clothing and underwear trap moisture next to the skin. Men should choose loose boxers over briefs when possible.
  • Changing underwear daily.
  • Avoiding sharing clothing and towels with others. An infection can spread easily across the infected surfaces.
  • Cleaning exercise equipment before use. The fungus behind jock itch can survive on hard surfaces easily.
  • Wearing sandals in public showers or at the pool to avoid making contact with infected surfaces.

Outlook

While jock itch itself is not serious, it can be a persistent and recurrent problem that causes discomfort and itching. It does not cause any long-term damage, but the rash and other related rashes such as athlete’s foot have a tendency to recur if proper preventive measures have not been taken.

Sours: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315788

Jock Itch: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

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What is jock itch?

Tinea cruris, most commonly known as jock itch, is a fungal infection of the skin.

It belongs to a group of fungal skin infections called tinea. Like other tinea infections, jock itch is caused by mold-like fungi, which are known as dermatophytes. These microscopic fungi live on the skin as well as on the hair and nails.

They’re typically harmless, but they can multiply quickly and cause infections when they’re allowed to thrive in warm, moist areas. That’s why jock itch usually develops in the skin around the groin, inner thighs, and buttocks.

Jock itch is most common in men and adolescent boys. The infection causes a rash that often itches or burns. The affected areas can also be red, flaky, or scaly.

Though jock itch can be bothersome, it’s typically a mild infection. Treating it quickly will minimize symptoms and keep the infection from spreading.

Most people find relief simply by applying topical antifungal medications and by keeping the affected area clean and dry.

What are the symptoms of jock itch?

Common symptoms of jock itch in the affected area include:

  • redness
  • persistent itching
  • burning sensation
  • flaking, peeling, or cracking skin
  • rash that gets worse with exercise or activity
  • changes in skin color
  • rash that doesn’t improve or worsens, or spreads with over-the-counter hydrocortisone (anti-itch) cream

Jock itch typically affects the groin and inner thighs. It may spread to the abdomen and buttocks, but the scrotum usually isn’t affected.

What causes jock itch?

Jock itch is caused by a group of fungi called dermatophytes. These fungi naturally live on your skin and normally don’t cause problems. However, when you remain in sweat-soaked clothes after exercising, the lengthy exposure to moisture can allow the fungi to multiply quickly.

When you have an overgrowth of dermatophytes in your groin area, it causes the infection known as jock itch.

The fungus that causes jock itch is highly contagious. You may get the fungal infection through close personal contact with an infected person or through contact with the unwashed clothing of an infected person.

The term “jock itch” may give the impression that only athletes develop the infection, but it can happen to anyone. Those who are overweight are more likely to experience jock itch because the fungus can thrive in folds of skin, which are prone to sweating.

As a preventive measure, it’s important to wash with soap and water in your groin and armpit areas daily. Jock itch may also be triggered by prolonged exposure to moisture and friction from clothes.

How is jock itch diagnosed?

Your doctor will likely be able to diagnose jock itch simply by performing a physical exam and inspecting the affected area of skin.

In some cases, your doctor may take some scrapings of skin cells from the area to help diagnose the condition. This may also help rule out other skin disorders, such as psoriasis.

How is jock itch treated?

In most cases, jock itch can be treated at home effectively. You can try the following remedies to get rid of the infection:

  • Apply an over-the-counter antifungal cream, powder, or spray to the affected area.
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and warm water.
  • Dry the affected area thoroughly after bathing and exercise.
  • Change clothes and undergarments every day.
  • Wear loose cotton clothing.
  • Treat any other fungal infections, such as athlete’s foot.

When should I see my doctor about jock itch?

If your symptoms don’t improve after two weeks of home treatments, you should make an appointment to see your doctor. You may have developed a secondary infection that needs prompt treatment.

If you don’t already have a dermatologist, you can browse doctors in your area through the Healthline FindCare tool.

If you do have jock itch, but it’s not responding to over-the-counter medications and home remedies, your doctor may prescribe something stronger. Possible medications include:

  • topical medications
    • econazole (Ecoza)
    • oxiconazole (Oxistat)
  • oral medications

Oral antifungal medications may cause unpleasant side effects, such as upset stomach and headaches. If you experience any of these side effects, make sure to discuss them with your doctor.

How can jock itch be prevented?

Practicing good hygiene is the best defense against jock itch. Regular hand washing can greatly reduce your risk of getting this infection from someone else. It’s also important to keep your skin clean and dry, especially the area around your groin.

Wash the area regularly with soap, and dry the area thoroughly after bathing. Applying baby powder around your groin can also be helpful for preventing excess moisture.

Avoid tight-fitting clothing as that can further increase your risk of jock itch. Tight clothes can rub or chafe your skin, which makes you more susceptible. You may want to try wearing boxer shorts instead of boxer briefs.

It’s also beneficial to wear loose-fitting clothing in hot or humid weather. Loose clothing can prevent sweating and the warm, moist environment in which fungus thrives. Make sure you wash any workout clothes or athletic supporters after each use.

Athlete’s foot is another infection that can be caused by the same fungi that causes jock itch. If you have athlete’s foot, treat it quickly. You can avoid spreading it to your groin area by making sure you don’t use the same towel you use on your feet for your groin.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/jock-itch
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Jock Itch (Tinea Cruris)

5239734Information for

Images of Tinea Cruris

Overview

Jock itch (tinea cruris) is a surface (superficial) fungal infection of the skin on either side of the body where the thigh joins the abdomen, known as the groin. It is often spread to the groin from tinea infection on the feet (tinea pedis or athlete's feet).

Who's at risk?

Jock itch is very common around the world and is more of a problem in warm, moist regions, as the fungus thrives in these conditions.

People who wear tight clothing for extended periods, share clothing, participate in athletics, or are overweight or diabetic are more often affected with jock itch. It is common in adult men.

Signs and Symptoms

Large round, red patches with bumpy, scaling edges occur in the groin and may extend down the inner thigh or onto the belly or buttocks areas. Jock itch is usually not present on the genitals. It is usually very itchy.

Self-Care Guidelines

Check your feet and treat athlete's foot if it is present, as it can often spread from there.

Over-the-counter antifungal creams such as miconazole (eg, Monistat®), clotrimazole (Lotrimin®), or tolnaftate (Tinactin®) are very effective. Apply it twice a day until a few days after the rash seems to be gone, which usually takes about 2–3 weeks. You may still see flat, brown areas of discoloration for several weeks, but these do not need to be treated as long as there is no longer itching or bumps and scales in the area.

Reinfection can be prevented. Keep the area cool and dry by drying the body thoroughly after bathing and wearing loose cotton clothing. Wash your clothing and linens in hot water. If you think you also have athlete's foot, use a separate towel for your feet and try to keep your feet dry as well, by avoiding wearing shoes for long periods or wearing loose-fitting shoes. Clean your bath/shower with bleach and floors with an appropriate cleaner to kill any fungal spores. You should also avoid sharing clothing and wear footwear in public bathrooms/showers and gyms. Skin folds can be a continually moist environment that aids growth of this fungus. If this is a recurrent problem for you, it may help to lose weight.

When to Seek Medical Care

If you see no improvement after 2 weeks of self-care, see your doctor.

Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe

Your doctor may do a scraping to look for fungus under the microscope or a biopsy if your diagnosis is uncertain.

Antifungal creams or pills may be prescribed.

Trusted Links

MedlinePlus: Tinea InfectionsClinical Information and Differential Diagnosis of Tinea Cruris

References

Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology, pp.1174-1185. New York: Mosby, 2003.

Freedberg, Irwin M., ed. Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 6th ed. pp.1999, 1102. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Sours: https://www.skinsight.com/skin-conditions/adult/tinea-cruris
How to tell if a rash needs medical attention

Jock Itch (Tinea Cruris)

5239738Information for

Images of Tinea Cruris

Overview

Tinea cruris is the medical term for jock itch, which is an itchy fungal infection of the skin of the groin. The rash of jock itch usually begins in the top creases of the thigh as raised, red, itchy patches and may become pink or red, flaky or bumpy as it spreads. The fungus (Trichophyton rubrum) is the same as that which causes other types of ringworm, including athlete's foot, so anyone with any type of ringworm may spread the infection to other areas on the body.

Jock itch is easily treated, though it is contagious so it is best to avoid intimate contact or sharing of towels or clothes until it has gone away.

Who's at risk?

Jock itch is very common; it is usually seen in teen and adult men, particularly in those in warm, humid climates. It is also very common in athletes, especially those who wear tight athletic gear (like a jock strap). Jock itch can also be seen in people who are overweight or diabetic.

Signs and Symptoms

Large, round, red patches, with bumpy, scaling edges occur in the groin and may extend down the inner thigh or onto the belly or buttocks areas. Jock itch is usually not present in the genital area. It is usually a very itchy rash.

Self-Care Guidelines

Check your feet and treat athlete's foot if it is present, as it can often spread from there.

Over-the-counter antifungal creams such as miconazole (eg, Monistat®), clotrimazole (Lotrimin®), or tolnaftate (Tinactin®) are very effective. Apply it twice a day until a few days after the rash seems to be gone, which usually takes about 2–3 weeks. You may still see flat, brown areas of discoloration for several weeks, but these do not need to be treated as long as there is no longer itching or bumps and scales in the area.

Reinfection can be prevented. Keep the area cool and dry by drying the body thoroughly after bathing and wearing loose cotton clothing. Wash your clothing and linens in hot water. If you think you also have athlete's foot, use a separate towel for your feet and try to keep your feet dry as well, by avoiding wearing shoes for long periods or wearing loose-fitting shoes. Clean your bath/shower with bleach and floors with an appropriate cleaner to kill any fungal spores. You should also avoid sharing clothing and wear footwear in public bathrooms/showers and gyms. Skin folds can be a continually moist environment that aids growth of this fungus. If this is a recurrent problem for you, it may help to lose weight.

When to Seek Medical Care

If you see no improvement after 2 weeks of self-care, see your doctor.

Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe

Your doctor may do a scraping to look for fungus under the microscope or a biopsy if your diagnosis is uncertain.

Antifungal creams or pills may be prescribed.

Trusted Links

Clinical Information and Differential Diagnosis of Tinea Cruris

References

Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology, pp.1174-1185. New York: Mosby, 2003.

Freedberg, Irwin M., ed. Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 6th ed. pp.1999, 1102. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Sours: https://www.skinsight.com/skin-conditions/teen/tinea-cruris

Rash pictures itch jock

Jock Itch

What is jock itch?

Jock itch is a fungal skin infection. It is caused by a fungus commonly found in gyms and locker rooms. Jock itch mostly affects males, although it is possible for females to get it, too. Jock itch appears as a skin rash around the groin, but can appear on your upper thigh, scrotum, penis, and anus. It is not serious. However, the itching can be extremely uncomfortable, even painful.

Symptoms of jock itch

Jock itch rash appears red, raised, and scaly around the edges. The rash itches. Like a blister, the rash can ooze fluid. The center of the rash is reddish-brown.

What causes jock itch?

Jock itch is caused by exposure to the fungus. This can happen through direct skin-to-skin contact. It also can be spread through infected clothing. The jock itch fungus grows in moist conditions, such as steamy public shower facilities and locker rooms, and in damp towels and clothing.

How is jock itch diagnosed?

Your doctor can usually tell whether the rash is jock itch by the way it looks. They also will ask you questions about your exposure to places where the rash is spread. If your doctor is uncertain, they may scrape a sample of the rash off your body to send to the lab.

Can jock itch be prevented or avoided?

The best way to avoid or prevent jock itch is to carefully dry off and wear clean, dry clothes after using a public shower facility or locker room. Be sure to wash your clothing after each exposure. Sweaty or damp clothing stuffed into a bag is the perfect environment for a fungus to grow.

Jock itch treatment

There are several things you can do on your own to treat jock itch:

  • Wash the rash with soap and water.
  • Pat the area dry (allow plenty of time for it to dry).
  • Apply an over-the-counter antifungal cream or powder to the rash.
  • Follow the directions on the cream packaging.
  • Wear clean underwear each time you apply the cream.

Living with jock itch

Once you’ve had jock itch, you should take preventive actions to avoid it in the future. Remember to dry off completely and wear clean, dry clothes after spending time at a public shower facility or locker room. Wash and dry your workout clothes after each use.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • Is athlete’s foot the same infection that causes jock itch?
  • Is jock itch the same thing as ringworm?
  • Can jock itch spread to other parts of my body?
  • Will I need an antibiotic if the blisters break open?
  • Should I avoid sexual intercourse with a partner if I have jock itch?

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Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

Sours: https://familydoctor.org/condition/jock-itch/
How to Remedy Jock Itch

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