Ut austin course schedule

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Registering for Classes

One Stop is here to help you with questions about planning your course schedule, registering for classes and mapping your degree path.

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How to Register for Classes

  1. Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Meet with your academic advisor in your college or school to discuss your degree requirements. This is recommended for all students and is required for many majors and departments.

  2. Find Your Registration Time

    Find your registration access date and times on your Registration Information Sheet (RIS). Update your contact information if it has changed.

    Registration Time 

  3. Clear Bars

    Check your RIS to see your bars. Clear any bars that prevent you from registering.

    RIS

  4. Register for Classes

    Register for classes online during your scheduled access times.

    Register Now

  5. Pay Your Tuition

    Pay your tuition and fee bill or confirm attendance.

    Ways to Pay

If you miss registering during your scheduled access time, learn about late registration.

Need Help?

Meet with your advisor. Find your advisor’s contact information in the How to Schedule With an Advisor document or via the college or school at the links below. If you still need help after meeting with your advisor, contact the Graduation Help Desk.

Graduation Help Desk

Auditing a Course

  • Auditing a course means you are an observer or a “guest” of the instructor.
  • Permission to audit a course is given by the instructor and only when space is available.
  • Auditors do not participate, complete coursework, or contribute to the class.
  • It is the instructor’s discretion and responsibility to add the auditor to Canvas, Zoom or any other teaching platform.
  • Your permission to audit a course can be revoked by the instructor at any time.
  • Auditors will not receive credit for auditing a course, and there will be no registration record or transcript of the audited course.

Students currently enrolled at UT Austin

If you will be enrolled as a student at the time of course follow these steps:

  1. Using the Class Auditor Permit, speak with the instructor of the course to receive permission to audit the course. Digital signatures are accepted.
  2. Once approval is received, send the signed audit permit to your Dean’s Office for permission to audit. If approved, your college will send the approved Class Auditor Permit to the Registrar’s Office Student Records for record keeping only. There is no registration record or transcript for someone auditing a course. Once you have received Dean’s approval you are approved to audit the course and further communication regarding the course is between you and the instructor.
  3. It is the instructor’s discretion and responsibility to add you as an observer to Canvas or any other web-based platform. This permission will be given only when the class has started.

Non- UT Austin students, under the age of 65

If you will not be enrolled as a student at the time of the course and you are under age 65, follow these steps:

  1. Using the Class Auditor Permit, speak with the instructor of the course to receive permission to audit the course. Digital signatures are accepted.
  2. Once approval is received, take the signed Class Auditor Permit to the Bursar’s Office, located in room 8 of the UT Tower. There you will pay a $20 fee for each course you are planning to audit. If you are unable to physically turn in the form to the Bursar’s office, you can mail the form and payment to: Bursar (Cashier) Services, P.O. Box , Austin, Texas
  3. Once payment has been made, the Bursar’s Office will send the permit to the Office of the Registrar Student Records for filing only. There is no registration record or transcript for someone auditing a course. After payment has been made, you are approved to audit the course and further communication regarding the course is between you and the instructor.
  4. It is the instructor’s discretion and responsibility to add you as an observer to Canvas or any other web-based platform. This permission will be given only when the class has started.

Current UT Austin Employee

If you are employee of the university you are eligible to audit up to (3) semester hours of coursework per semester:

  1. Using the Class Auditor Permit, speak with the instructor of the course to receive permission to audit the course. Digital signatures are accepted.
  2. Once approval is received, send the signed Class Auditor Permit to the Office of the Registrar Student Records at [email protected], for filing only. There is no registration record or transcript for someone auditing a course. Once approved you are ready to audit the course and further communication about the course is between you and the instructor.
  3. The $20 fee is waived, for up to 3 semester hours, for current employees.
  4. It is the instructor’s discretion and responsibility to add you as an observer to Canvas or any other web-based platform. This permission will be given only when the class has started.

Auditors over the age of 65

If you are over the age of

  1. Using the Class Auditor Permit, speak with the instructor of the course to receive permission to audit the course. Digital signatures are accepted.
  2. Once approval is received, send the signed Class Auditor Permit to the Office of the Registrar Student Records at [email protected], for filing only. There is no registration record or transcript for someone auditing a course. Once approved you are ready to audit the course and further communication about the course is between you and the instructor.
  3. It is the instructor’s discretion and responsibility to add you as an observer to Canvas or any other web-based platform. This permission will be given only when the class has started.

Instructor Help

If you need to add the auditor to your Canvas course, additional information on how to do so can be found at the following here.  It is recommended that you use the observer role in Canvas, which is better aligned with our auditor policy.

More information about the observer role can be found at the following here.

If you have additional questions or need further assistance with Canvas, the Canvas support team can be contacted at [email protected]

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Fall Course Schedule

Fall Course Schedule

Visit the UT Registrar's page for official information about registration.

Review your Registration Information Sheet for information about your registration access times and for any bars to registration. 

Exemplars in PolicymakingShute, William Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Exemplars in PolicymakingShute, William Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Space Law: Busn Space Operatns Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Reentry: Criminal JusticeGaebler, Helen Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Next Generation Scholars RschMosser, Michael Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Undergraduate Courses
Intro To Public PolicyLind, Michael Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Undergraduate Courses
Covid and the LawDickerson, Mechele Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Seminar: Intl Sports/hmn Rgts Law Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Cybersecurity Technology Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Oil and Gas Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Cybersecurity Law and Policy Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Seminar: Saving Our PlanetCohen, Jane Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Wrking Constrctvly With PplEaton, David J. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Crisis and Risk ManagementBrockett, Patrick L. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Fed Budget and Govt Finance-DCBrown, Dustin Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Fed Budget and Govt Finance- DC Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Politics Of Public PolicyLind, Michael Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Thinking, Writing and Briefing for IntelligencePope, J. Paul Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
CommunicationsDorn, Edwin MPAff
Electives
Writing for Global Policy StdsRedei, Lorinc MGPS
Electives
Analytic FoundationsWong, Pat MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Intelligence and Natl SecurityAdair, Bianca Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Money in US PoliticsRoberts, Brian Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Reproductive Hlth Rts and JstcAiken, Abigail R.A. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Nonprtf Mgmt: Succeed/Director Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Political Geography Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Communications- WBEaton, David J. MPAff
Electives
Poverty and Education Policy Holme, Jennifer Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Econ Of Covid19 Pandemic-WbGalbraith, James K. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Trnsportatn Planning/policy Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Blk Pltcs: Frm Rcnstrcn To BlmJoseph, Peniel Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Analytic FoundationsMeyer, Michael MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
CommunicationsOsborne, Cynthia MPAff
Electives
Communications MPAff
Electives
8-Intro Geographic Info SysPavon, Miguel A. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Writing for Global Policy-WB MGPS
Electives
CommunicationsDeitch, Michele MPAff
Electives
Us Promtn Of Democracy AbroadPomar, Mark Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Financing State and Local GovtLuby, Martin J. MPAff
Electives
Policy Making/leadershipMcRaven, William Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Collaborative GovernanceBixler, R. Patrick MPAff
Electives
Philanthropy and Social ChangeLentz, Becky Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Innov in Pub Mgmt Post CovidSculley, Sheryl MPAff
Electives
Managing Overseas OperationsEngle, Gregory W. MPAff, MGPS
Electives
Strat/ideas/statcrft: Amer ExpSuri, Jeremi Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Corporate Governance Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Electives
Finance for Social InnovationKothare, Meeta MPAff
Electives
Public Financial ManagementLuby, Martin J. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Public Financial ManagementLuby, Martin J. Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Eval Mthds for Glbl DevelWeaver, Catherine MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Core Courses
Nonprofit Program EvalBixler, R. Patrick Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Core Courses
Apprenticeshp in Public Pol-DcShute, William Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Apprenticeshp in Public Pol-DcShute, William Ph.D., MPAff, MGPS, MPAff-DC, MGPS-DC
Sours: https://lbj.utexas.edu/fallcourse-schedule
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Past Syllabi, CVs, and Instructor Surveys

Identify the right classes and instructors. Search course syllabi, instructors&#; curriculum vitaes and instructor surveys.

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Understanding the Course Schedule

Classes Found

Course Information

Course ID:
R

Registration Information

  • 1L and upperclass elective

Description

Same as LAW P, Reading Group: Academic Freedom, The First Amendment, and the American University.

This non-writing seminar will meet every other week to discuss the professor’s book in progress, Academic Freedom, the First Amendment, and the American University.  The book explores the emergence of academic freedom as a distinctive First Amendment right and its relationship to general First Amendment rights of free speech.  It observes that judicial decisions have extended this right to professors, universities, and students, whose interests in academic freedom may conflict.  It also observes that state interests and the constitutional rights of individual citizens may conflict with interests in academic freedom.  Examples of state interests include national security, public health, and the enforcement of laws prohibiting employment discrimination and harassing speech.  Examples individual constitutional rights include free speech, the free exercise of religion, and equal protection.  After reviewing the case law, the book proposes a theory of First Amendment academic freedom to address these complicated issues.  Students will write two to three page reaction papers for every seminar meeting.  Class discussions will address the process of legal scholarship as well as the substantive contents of the book.  The course does not satisfy the law school’s writing requirement.  Grading will be pass/fail.

Course Information

Course ID:
V

Experiential learning credit:
1 hour

Short course:
2/10/22 — 4/7/22

Description

Same as LAW P, Topic: Advanced Criminal Law Skills.

This course will take a criminal case from its inception through trial, plea or dismissal. Students will perform skills weekly on different elements of the case such as intake evaluation, pretrial motions, plea negotiations, witness preparation and trial. Ethics will also be included. The course is recommended for those with an interest in a career in criminal law, especially those considering employment in either a prosecutor's or public defender’s office.

The class will be a combination of remote and in person exercises.  No student will be required to appear in person, but students will be given the option of doing so on some of the class days.  The hope is to give students the chance to perform in ways that are currently being used in different jurisdictions around the country.    Obviously this is evolving and subject to change.  The plan is also to involve guest appearances by some former students who took this class and are now working in public defender or prosecutor’s offices.

Students who have taken LAW P, Adv Skills: Criminal Court may not take LAW P, Advanced Criminal Law Skills.

Course Information

Course ID:
F

Experiential learning credit:
4 hours

Description

Same as LAW W, Advocacy Practice & Theory for the New Millennium.

This class is limited to 3L students. It is for students who have mastered the basic and advanced advocacy skills and will focus on cutting-edge advocacy theories and techniques. The class combines both discussion and practice sessions focusing on both traditional legal exercises and other experimental approaches to advocacy. Students will also spend several weeks learning and practicing how to conduct a voir dire examination and will perform a full voir dire using independent jurors.  Students will work with Dell Medical students on a trial. This class operates in a seminar fashion as well as focusing on skills-based training. The class has an extensive reading/discussion list in addition to the skill work and outside research. Suggested prerequisites: Evidence, Advocacy Survey, and Advanced Advocacy work such as appellate advocacy,  ADR courses, clinics or interscholastic work.

  • MON, WED am – pm

P/F Allowed (JD only)

Course Information

Course ID:
D

Experiential learning credit:
3 hours

Description

Same as LAW M, Advocacy Survey.

This class has a mandatory evening skills component (Monday or Wednesday evening). Students must register for both the lecture (M) and either Monday or Wednesday evening skills portion (N) of the class. Please note, the evening Skills portion of the class will not begin until week 5 or 6 of the semester and will run for eight weeks. Advocacy survey is designed for beginning advocacy students who are interested in gaining exposure to all areas of advocacy. While focusing primarily on trial skills, the course will also cover topics such as transactional practice, motion practice and alternative dispute resolution. By combining theory through the lecture sessions with technique training in skills sessions, students are able to practice what they learn. Students get hands-on practice in areas such as opening and closing statements, the use and relevance of technology in litigation, transferable skills for a transactional practice, and the basic skills necessary to try a case. The skill sessions will end with the trial of a case. Students will examine a case file from pretrial motions, transactional, ADR, arbitration, voir dire, and trial. This is a 4-credit series (1 credit pass/fail, 3 credits graded).

Prerequisite or Concurrent: Evidence.

Course Information

Course ID:
E

Experiential learning credit:
1 hour

Short course:
2/16/22 — 4/6/22

Description

Same as LAW N, Advocacy Survey: Skills.

Students get hands-on practice in areas such as opening and closing statements, the use and relevance of technology in litigation, transferable skills for a transactional practice, and the basic skills necessary to try a case. The skill sessions will end with the trial of a case.

Course Information

Course ID:
E

Experiential learning credit:
1 hour

Short course:
2/14/22 — 4/4/22

Description

Same as LAW N, Advocacy Survey: Skills.

Students get hands-on practice in areas such as opening and closing statements, the use and relevance of technology in litigation, transferable skills for a transactional practice, and the basic skills necessary to try a case. The skill sessions will end with the trial of a case.

Course Information

Course ID:
R

Experiential learning credit:
3 hours

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Reverse-priority registration
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3 HOUR COURSE) The Alternative Dispute Resolution Survey course is designed to provide a broad-based introduction to negotiation, mediation, and arbitration, for students interested in either advocacy or transactional practices.  ADR methods are now more common than the courtroom for resolving civil disputes; more than 99% of civil cases are settled before trial, if cases are even filed at the courthouse. Many commercial agreements now contain mandatory mediation/arbitration provisions, and statutory and case law both favor ADR. This course will examine the policy and business reasons for the rise in ADR; explore the various ADR methods; discuss negotiating and why lawyers must learn successful negotiating skills; and provide students with an opportunity to experience these concepts through class exercises. The professor is a 30+year litigation attorney with substantial experience to both trial and ADR disputes, and he brings a practical, real-world approach to the lectures and exercises. There will be no exam, but a final written project is required. Grading will be based upon class participation, attendance, and the final paper. Please note: Students may only miss two classes per semester, additional absences will be reflected in a lower grade.

P/F Not Allowed

Course Information

Course ID:
P

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Prof. keeps own waitlist
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW D, Animal Law.

Is there a place in the law for the consideration of the interests of animals? Throughout the semester, we will examine the jurisprudential basis and theoretical underpinnings of the current status of animals in our legal system. Students will read a diverse cross-section of legal theory and case law delving into controversial moral, ethical, and public policy considerations in balancing the interests of animals and humans. Thus, we will study animal law through the prism of traditional legal disciplines, including tort, contract, criminal, regulatory, administrative, and constitutional law. This is not an animal rights course. Rather, students will be expected to come to class prepared and ready to challenge one another to consider whether the law has a place for animals, and if so, where we should draw the line. From time to time, guests with expertise in relevant legal areas will be invited to address the class. One-third of each student’s course grade will be based on regular class attendance and substantive participation demonstrating thoughtful review of the assigned materials prior to class. (Students who arrive substantially late or leave early may not be credited for having attending class. Anyone experiencing or anticipating excessive absences is strongly encouraged to contact the instructor.) As a final project, students will apply their knowledge from the course to prepare an original law review-style research paper at least 20 pages long on an approved topic of their choosing. The paper, which is not graded anonymously, will constitute two-thirds of the course grade. Each student also will make a brief presentation on his or her paper during one of the final two class sessions, which will be considered in evaluating class participation.

Course Information

Course ID:
Q

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

This course will be taught entirely online via Zoom. Same as LAW M, Antitrust: Economic Analysis/Legal Interpretation.

The course begins by explaining why the American antitrust laws' critical expressions -- "restraint of trade," "monopolizes," "decreases competition" -- should be interpreted in ways that make the legality of the various types of business conduct covered by those laws depend on economic analyses of the motivations of those who engage in them or certain consequences that they have. It then analyzes the economic factors that determine the legality of the various practices that the American antitrust laws cover. Approximately three-fourths of class-time will be devoted to economic analysis. The remaining time will be devoted to explaining the positive case-law and guidelines and analyzing the respects in which the courts and antitrust enforcement agencies are analyzing the legality of the conduct in question correctly and incorrectly. No background in economics will be presupposed, though students without such a background will have to work harder, particularly at the beginning of the course. Diagrams but no more advanced type of mathematics will be used. This course can be taken instead of or in addition to the regular antitrust course.

Course Information

Course ID:
Q

Experiential learning credit:
2 hours

Description

Same as LAW H, Appellate Clerkship Writing.

This pass-fail course teaches students to do the work of an appellate clerk. We will analyze briefs and record excerpts, write sample bench memos, and draft and edit opinions. I expect students to attend every class unless excused. The class is only open to students who have accepted an appellate clerkship or who plan to apply to one.

Course Information

Course ID:
W

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW M, Arbitration: Theory and Practice.

In recent decades there has been an explosion of interest in arbitration. The aim of this course is to think deeply about this trend, and in particular about the justifications for arbitration as a method of dispute resolution, its limits, and the principles that govern its practice. We will select topics that allow us to connect the debates over arbitration with larger debates about the function and the forms of law in modern societies. To illustrate the range of questions we might address, consider the following. Is the increased interest in arbitration a response to perceived defects in the regular court system and if so, what are those defects? More generally, how do arbitration courts and the ordinary judiciary interact? Would arbitration work in a world without courts? What about criticisms of arbitration, such as that it systematically advantages the more powerful party in a contractual relationship? Are there any matters that the state should declare nonarbitrable, and on what grounds? What kind of law are arbitrators supposed to apply in rendering their awards? How does that law relate to the law courts use? How does it relate to broader notions of justice and equity? Is there a role for stare decisis, and should there be? How should arbitrators vote? Should dissents be allowed? Also, a number of very important and interesting topics arise in special forms of arbitration. For example, under the ICSID system in Washington, an individual is allowed to sue a state in its international capacity before an international arbitral body. Is a strong form of transnational law being created in these cases? Are there any structural biases in such a system? How does the law developed in these cases fit with democratic values?

  • MON, TUE, WED – pm

P/F Not Allowed

Course Information

Course ID:
R

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW M, Bankruptcy.

This course covers Title 11 of the U.S. Code, the Bankruptcy Code. It includes both consumer and business bankruptcy and a modest introduction to state law collection issues. Students learn the basic concepts of "straight" bankruptcy liquidation (Chapter 7), in which a trustee is appointed to sell the debtor's assets and pay the proceeds to the creditors. For consumers, that topic includes the fresh start--the discharge of all pre-existing debt--and the identification of exempt assets. Students also study the rehabilitation provisions, under which the debtor attempts to pay all or some part of the pre- bankruptcy debt: Chapter 13 payout plans for consumers and Chapter 11 reorganization proceedings for businesses. Principal attention is given to the substance of the bankruptcy laws, including the "avoiding powers" (for example, preferences, fraudulent conveyances, and rejection of executory contracts), treatment of secured creditors (including the automatic stay against repossession or foreclosure), and priorities in asset distribution. More than half of the course is devoted to business reorganizations in Chapter 11 [cases like Sears, Hertz and Neiman Marcus], including the legal requirements for confirmation of a plan of reorganization and "cramdown" of recalcitrant creditors. Questions of jurisdiction and procedure are introduced, but are not the major focus of the course. The course attempts to give balanced attention to the practice realities of negotiation and leverage within a complex of doctrinal rules and to the social and economic consequences of the bankruptcy system in both its consumer and commercial manifestations.

Prerequisite: Secured Credit. The prerequisite may be concurrent, that is, taken during the same semester.

  • MON, TUE, WED – am

P/F Not Allowed

Course Information

Course ID:
C

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Reverse-priority registration
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW K, Business Associations.

An introduction to the legal rules and principles, as well as some of the economic factors, that pattern the conduct of productive enterprise in the U.S. The principal focus will be upon the large, publicly traded corporation that dominates much of the U.S. business environment - in particular, its financing, its control, and the potentially conflicting interests that the firm must mediate. Legal topics to be covered accordingly include shareholder and executive compensation, basic fiduciary obligations, shareholder voting rights, derivative suits, corporate reorganization and control transactions. We shall also devote some attention to partnerships, closely held corporations and other business forms. No prior background in business law or economics is assumed. Corporations and Business Association, Business Associations, and Business Associations (Enriched) may not be repeated for credit.

Course Information

Course ID:
R

Registration Information

  • 1L and upperclass elective
  • Reverse-priority registration
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

This course will examine some general jurisprudential and moral issues related to the American system of capital punishment. The course will focus primarily on the development of the law governing capital punishment in the United States since Some of the main themes include: the legal structure of the Supreme Court's post death penalty jurisprudence, the scope of available appellate and post-conviction review in capital cases (particularly federal habeas review), the ubiquitous problems surrounding the representation afforded indigent capital defendants, proportionality limits on the imposition of the death penalty for various offenders (e.g., juveniles and persons with mental retardation), the role of racial discrimination in the administration of the death penalty, and the likely trajectory of the American death penalty. The course will be graded on a letter-grade basis for all students.  This course will satisfy the constitutional law II requirement.

Course Information

Course ID:
G

Experiential learning credit:
3 hours

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW M, Topic: Capital Punishment, Adv Topics: Providing Effective Assistance of Counsel in Capital Trials.

The ABA Guidelines for the Appointment and Performance of Defense Counsel in Death Cases () state that “the responsibilities of defense counsel in a death penalty case are uniquely demanding, both in the knowledge that counsel must possess and in the skills he or she must master.” This advanced death penalty course studies various aspects of capital trial defense that must be mastered to meet contemporary standards of practice. The course addresses defense counsel’s duty to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the client’s social history; counsel’s duty to identify and investigate issues of trauma, race, culture, and mental health presented by the client and the case; counsel’s duty to pursue a negotiated settlement of the case; and counsel’s duty to develop an integrated theory of the case. Classes alternate between traditional lectures and class discussion of assigned readings, presentations by occasional guest speakers, and workshops in which students will apply course reading and instruction to a series of lawyering assignments related to an actual pending capital case.

 

 

Course Information

Course ID:
G

Registration Information

  • Upperclass-only elective
  • Will use floating mean GPA if applicable

Description

Same as LAW M, Topic: Capital Punishment, Advanced: Race & the Death Penalty.

  • MON, TUE, WED, THU – am

P/F Not Allowed

Course Information

Course ID:

Description

Introduction to the civil adjudicative process, primarily that of the federal courts, including jurisdiction, pleading, dispositive motions, discovery, and trial procedure.

  • TUE, WED, THU – am

P/F Not Allowed

Eval:

Take-home up to 8 hrs on 5/10/22

Course Information

Course ID:

Description

Introduction to the civil adjudicative process, primarily that of the federal courts, including jurisdiction, pleading, dispositive motions, discovery, and trial procedure.

Course Information

Course ID:
W

Description

No description text available.

Course Information

Course ID:
W

Description

No description text available.

Course Information

Course ID:
W

Description

No description text available.

Course Information

Course ID:
C

Experiential learning credit:
6 hours

Description

ACTUAL INNOCENCE CLINIC IS A 6-HR. CLINIC. Students screen and investigate claims by inmates that they are actually innocent of the offenses for which they are incarcerated. While investigating cases, students typically interview witnesses, research cases, review trial transcripts, and occasionally visit inmates in prison. The weekly clinic class addresses topics relevant to actual innocence law and procedure.

APPLY ONLINE: https://law.utexas.edu/clinics/application-information/

Course Information

Course ID:
C

Experiential learning credit:
4 hours

Sours: https://law.utexas.edu/courses/?page=all

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Course Schedules

The Course Schedule lists important information you need in order to register, including each class offered with its time, location, instructor (if available) and unique number. It is published about two weeks before registration. Please plan on meeting with your advisor before the course schedule is released.

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Checked the schedule and ready to register? See Registering for Classes.

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