Countif with multiple criteria

Countif with multiple criteria DEFAULT

How to Use Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF and COUNTIFS Function

Excel has many functions where a user needs to specify a single or multiple criteria to get the result. For example, if you want to count cells based on multiple criteria, you can use the COUNTIF or COUNTIFS functions in Excel.

This tutorial covers various ways of using a single or multiple criteria in COUNTIF and COUNTIFS function in Excel.

While I will primarily be focussing on COUNTIF and COUNTIFS functions in this tutorial, all these examples can also be used in other Excel functions that take multiple criteria as inputs (such as SUMIF, SUMIFS, AVERAGEIF, and AVERAGEIFS).

An Introduction to Excel COUNTIF and COUNTIFS Functions

Let’s first get a grip on using COUNTIF and COUNTIFS functions in Excel.

Excel COUNTIF Function (takes Single Criteria)

Excel COUNTIF function is best suited for situations when you want to count cells based on a single criterion. If you want to count based on multiple criteria, use COUNTIFS function.

Syntax

=COUNTIF(range, criteria)

Input Arguments

  • range –  the range of cells which you want to count.
  • criteria – the criteria that must be evaluated against the range of cells for a cell to be counted.

Excel COUNTIFS Function (takes Multiple Criteria)

Excel COUNTIFS function is best suited for situations when you want to count cells based on multiple criteria.

Syntax

=COUNTIFS(criteria_range1, criteria1, [criteria_range2, criteria2]…)

Input Arguments

  • criteria_range1 – The range of cells for which you want to evaluate against criteria1.
  • criteria1 – the criteria which you want to evaluate for criteria_range1 to determine which cells to count.
  • [criteria_range2] – The range of cells for which you want to evaluate against criteria2.
  • [criteria2] – the criteria which you want to evaluate for criteria_range2 to determine which cells to count.

Now let’s have a look at some examples of using multiple criteria in COUNTIF functions in Excel.

Using NUMBER Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Functions

#1 Count Cells when Criteria is EQUAL to a Value

To get the count of cells where the criteria argument is equal to a specified value, you can either directly enter the criteria or use the cell reference that contains the criteria.

Below is an example where we count the cells that contain the number 9 (which means that the criteria argument is equal to 9). Here is the formula:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,D3)

Using multiple criteria in Excel Functions - number equal to

In the above example (in the pic), the criteria is in cell D3. You can also enter the criteria directly into the formula. For example, you can also use:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,9)

#2 Count Cells when Criteria is GREATER THAN a Value

To get the count of cells with a value greater than a specified value, we use the greater than operator (“>”). We could either use it directly in the formula or use a cell reference that has the criteria.

Whenever we use an operator in criteria in Excel, we need to put it within double quotes. For example, if the criteria is greater than 10, then we need to enter “>10” as the criteria (see pic below):

Here is the formula:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>10″)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Greater Than

You can also have the criteria in a cell and use the cell reference as the criteria. In this case, you need NOT put the criteria in double quotes:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,D3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - - Greater Than criteria in cell reference

There could also be a case when you want the criteria to be in a cell, but don’t want it with the operator. For example, you may want the cell D3 to have the number 10 and not >10.

In that case, you need to create a criteria argument which is a combination of operator and cell reference (see pic below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>”&D3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Greater Than operator and cell referenceNOTE: When you combine an operator and a cell reference, the operator is always in double quotes. The operator and cell reference are joined by an ampersand (&).

#3 Count Cells when Criteria is LESS THAN a Value

To get the count of cells with a value less than a specified value, we use the less than operator (“<“). We could either use it directly in the formula or use a cell reference that has the criteria.

Whenever we use an operator in criteria in Excel, we need to put it within double quotes. For example, if the criterion is that the number should be less than 5, then we need to enter “<5” as the criteria (see pic below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”<5″)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - less Than

You can also have the criteria in a cell and use the cell reference as the criteria. In this case, you need NOT put the criteria in double quotes (see pic below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,D3)

Excel COUNTIF Function with multiple criteria - Less Than criteria in cell reference

Also, there could be a case when you want the criteria to be in a cell, but don’t want it with the operator. For example, you may want the cell D3 to have the number 5 and not <5.

In that case, you need to create a criteria argument which is a combination of operator and cell reference:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”<“&D3)

Using Less Than operator in Excel COUNTIF function

NOTE: When you combine an operator and a cell reference, the operator is always in double quotes. The operator and cell reference are joined by an ampersand (&).

#4 Count Cells with Multiple Criteria – Between Two Values

To get a count of values between two values, we need to use multiple criteria in the COUNTIF function.

Here are two methods of doing this:

METHOD 1: Using COUNTIFS function

COUNTIFS function can handle multiple criteria as arguments and counts the cells only when all the criteria are TRUE. To count cells with values between two specified values (say 5 and 10), we can use the following COUNTIFS function:

=COUNTIFS($B$2:$B$11,”>5″,$B$2:$B$11,”<10″)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIFS Function - Between criteria

NOTE: The above formula does not count cells that contain 5 or 10. If you want to include these cells, use greater than equal to (>=) and less than equal to (<=) operators. Here is the formula:

=COUNTIFS($B$2:$B$11,”>=5″,$B$2:$B$11,”<=10″) 

You can also have these criteria in cells and use the cell reference as the criteria. In this case, you need NOT put the criteria in double quotes (see pic below):

Excel COUNTIFS Function with multiple criteria - Between criteria in cell references

You can also use a combination of cells references and operators (where the operator is entered directly in the formula). When you combine an operator and a cell reference, the operator is always in double quotes. The operator and cell reference are joined by an ampersand (&).

Excel COUNTIFS Function - Between criteria operator and cell references

METHOD 2: Using two COUNTIF functions

If you have multiple criteria, you can either use COUNTIFS or create a combination of COUNTIF functions. The formula below would also do the same thing:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>5″)-COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>10″)

In the above formula, we first find the number of cells that have a value greater than 5 and we subtract the count of cells with a value greater than 10. This would give us the result as 5 (which is the number of cells that have values more than 5 and less than equal to 10).

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Between criteria two countif

If you want the formula to include both 5 and 10, use the following formula instead:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>=5″)-COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>10″)

If you want the formula to exclude both ‘5’ and ’10’ from the counting, use the following formula:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>=5″)-COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”>10″)-COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,10)

You can have these criteria in cells and use the cells references, or you can use a combination of operators and cells references.

Using TEXT Criteria in Excel Functions

#1 Count Cells when Criteria is EQUAL to a Specified text

To count cells that contain an exact match of the specified text, we can simply use that text as the criteria. For example, in the dataset (shown below in the pic), if I want to count all the cells with the name Joe in it, I can use the below formula:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”Joe”)

Since this is a text string, I need to put the text criteria in double quotes.

Using Multiple Text Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function

You can also have the criteria in a cell and then use that cell reference (as shown below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,E3)

Using Multiple Text Criteria in Excel COUNTIFS Function

NOTE: You can get wrong results if there are leading/trailing spaces in the criteria or criteria range. Make sure you clean the data before using these formulas.

#2 Count Cells when Criteria is NOT EQUAL to a Specified text

Similar to what we saw in the above example, you can also count cells that do not contain a specified text. To do this, we need to use the not equal to operator (<>).

Suppose you want to count all the cells that do not contain the name JOE, here is the formula that will do it:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”<>Joe”)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Text criteria Not equal to

You can also have the criteria in a cell and use the cell reference as the criteria. In this case, you need NOT put the criteria in double quotes (see pic below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,E3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Text criteria Not equal cells references

There could also be a case when you want the criteria to be in a cell but don’t want it with the operator. For example, you may want the cell D3 to have the name Joe and not <>Joe.

In that case, you need to create a criteria argument which is a combination of operator and cell reference (see pic below):

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$11,”<>”&E3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Text criteria Not equal cells references and operator

When you combine an operator and a cell reference, the operator is always in double quotes. The operator and cell reference are joined by an ampersand (&).

Using DATE Criteria in Excel COUNTIF and COUNTIFS Functions

Excel store date and time as numbers. So we can use it the same way we use numbers.

#1 Count Cells when Criteria is EQUAL to a Specified Date

To get the count of cells that contain the specified date, we would use the equal to operator (=) along with the date.

To use the date, I recommend using the DATE function, as it gets rid of any possibility of error in the date value. So, for example, if I want to use the date September 1, 2015, I can use the DATE function as shown below:

=DATE(2015,9,1)

This formula would return the same date despite regional differences. For example, 01-09-2015 would be September 1, 2015 according to the  US date syntax and January 09, 2015 according to the UK date syntax. However, this formula would always return September 1, 2105.

Here is the formula to count the number of cells that contain the date 02-09-2015:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,DATE(2015,9,2))

Excel COUNTIF Function - Using multiple date criteria

#2 Count Cells when Criteria is BEFORE or AFTER to a Specified Date

To count cells that contain date before or after a specified date, we can use the less than/greater than operators.

For example, if I want to count all the cells that contain a date that is after September 02, 2015, I can use the formula:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,2))

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria after

Similarly, you can also count the number of cells before a specified date. If you want to include a date in the counting, use and ‘equal to’ operator along with ‘greater than/less than’ operator.

You can also use a cell reference that contains a date. In this case, you need to combine the operator (within double quotes) with the date using an ampersand (&).

See example below:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&F3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria using cell reference and ampersand

#3 Count Cells with Multiple Criteria – Between Two Dates

To get a count of values between two values, we need to use multiple criteria in the COUNTIF function.

We can do this using two methods – One single COUNTIFS function or two COUNTIF functions.

METHOD 1: Using COUNTIFS function

COUNTIFS function can take multiple criteria as the arguments and counts the cells only when all the criteria are TRUE. To count cells with values between two specified dates (say September 2 and September 7), we can use the following COUNTIFS function:

=COUNTIFS($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,2),$A$2:$A$11,”<“&DATE(2015,9,7))

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria before and after

The above formula does not count cells that contain the specified dates. If you want to include these dates as well, use greater than equal to (>=) and less than equal to (<=) operators. Here is the formula:

=COUNTIFS($A$2:$A$11,”>=”&DATE(2015,9,2),$A$2:$A$11,”<=”&DATE(2015,9,7))

You can also have the dates in a cell and use the cell reference as the criteria. In this case, you can not have the operator with the date in the cells. You need to manually add operators in the formula (in double quotes) and add cell reference using an ampersand (&). See the pic below:

=COUNTIFS($A$2:$A$11,”>”&F3,$A$2:$A$11,”<“&G3)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria before and after cell reference

METHOD 2: Using COUNTIF functions

If you have multiple criteria, you can either use one COUNTIFS function or create a combination of two COUNTIF functions. The formula below would also do the trick:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,2))-COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,7))

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria before and after using countif without equal to

In the above formula, we first find the number of cells that have a date after September 2 and we subtract the count of cells with dates after September 7. This would give us the result as 7 (which is the number of cells that have dates after September 2 and on or before September 7).

If you don’t want the formula to count both September 2 and September 7, use the following formula instead:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>=”&DATE(2015,9,2))-COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,7))

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - Date Criteria before and after using countif

If you want to exclude both the dates from counting, use the following formula:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,2))-COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,”>”&DATE(2015,9,7)-COUNTIF($A$2:$A$11,DATE(2015,9,7)))

Also, you can have the criteria dates in cells and use the cells references (along with operators in double quotes joined using ampersand).

Using WILDCARD CHARACTERS in Criteria in COUNTIF & COUNTIFS Functions

There are three wildcard characters in Excel:

  1. * (asterisk) – It represents any number of characters. For example, ex* could mean excel, excels, example, expert, etc.
  2. ? (question mark) – It represents one single character. For example, Tr?mp could mean Trump or Tramp.
  3. ~ (tilde) – It is used to identify a wildcard character (~, *, ?) in the text.

You can use COUNTIF function with wildcard characters to count cells when other inbuilt count function fails. For example, suppose you have a data set as shown below:

Count Cells that Contains Text in Excel Data Set

Now let’s take various examples:

#1 Count Cells that contain Text

To count cells with text in it, we can use the wildcard character * (asterisk). Since asterisk represents any number of characters, it would count all cells that have any text in it. Here is the formula:

=COUNTIFS($C$2:$C$11,”*”)

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - wildcard character count text

Note: The formula above ignores cells that contain numbers, blank cells, and logical values, but would count the cells contain an apostrophe (and hence appear blank) or cells that contain empty string (=””) which may have been returned as a part of a formula.

Here is a detailed tutorial on handling cases where there is an empty string or apostrophe.

Here is a detailed tutorial on handling cases where there are empty strings or apostrophes.

Below is a video that explains different scenarios of counting cells with text in it.

#2 Count Non-blank Cells

If you are thinking of using COUNTA function, think again.

Try it and it might fail you. COUNTA will also count a cell that contains an empty string (often returned by formulas as =”” or when people enter only an apostrophe in a cell). Cells that contain empty strings look blank but are not, and thus counted by the COUNTA function.

COUNTA will also count a cell that contains an empty string (often returned by formulas as =”” or when people enter only an apostrophe in a cell). Cells that contain empty strings look blank but are not, and thus counted by the COUNTA function.

Count Cells that Contains Text in Excel Data Set

So if you use the formula =COUNTA(A1:A11), it returns 11, while it should return 10.

Here is the fix:

=COUNTIF($A$1:$A$11,”?*”)+COUNT($A$1:$A$11)+SUMPRODUCT(–ISLOGICAL($A$1:$A$11))

Let’s understand this formula by breaking it down:

  • COUNTIF($N$8:$N$18,”?*”) –  This part of the formula returns 5. This includes any cell that has a text character in it. A ? represents one character and * represents any number of characters. Hence, the combination ?* in the criteria forces excel to count cells that have at least one text character in it.Using criteria in Excel Functions - count non blanks text
  • COUNT($A$1:$A$11) – This counts all the cells that contain numbers. In the above example, it returns 3.Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - count non blanks numbers
  • SUMPRODUCT(–ISLOGICAL($A$1:$A$11) – This counts all the cells that contain logical values. In the above example, it returns 2.Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - count non blanks logical values

 

#3 Count Cells that contain specific text

Let’s say we want to count all the cells where the sales rep name begins with J. This can easily be achieved by using a wildcard character in COUNTIF function. Here is the formula:

=COUNTIFS($C$2:$C$11,”J*”) 

Using Multiple Criteria in Excel COUNTIF Function - count specific text wildcard

The criteria J* specifies that the text in a cell should begin with J and can contain any number of characters.

If you want to count cells that contain the alphabet anywhere in the text, flank it with an asterisk on both sides. For example, if you want to count cells that contain the alphabet “a” in it, use *a* as the criteria.

This article is unusually long compared to my other articles. Hope you have enjoyed it. Let me know your thoughts by leaving a comment.

You May Also Find the following Excel tutorials useful:

Sours: https://trumpexcel.com/multiple-criteria-in-excel-countif/

COUNTIFS with multiple criteria and OR logic

By default, the COUNTIFS function applies AND logic. When you supply multiple conditions, all conditions must match in order to generate a count.

One solution is to supply multiple criteria in an array constant like this:

{"complete","pending"}

This will cause COUNTIFS to return two results: a count for "complete" and a count for "pending", packaged in an array result like this:

To get a final total, we wrap COUNTIFS inside SUM. The SUM function then sums all items in the array and returns the result.

Adding another OR criteria

You can add one additional criteria to this formula, but you'll need to use a single column array for one criteria and a single row array for the other. So, for example, to count orders that are "Complete" or "Pending", for either "Andy Garcia" or "Bob Jones", you can use:

=SUM(COUNTIFS(D4:D11,{"complete","pending"},C4:C11,{"Bob Jones";"Andy Garcia"}))

Note we use a semi-colon for the second array constant, which creates a vertical array. This works because Excel "pairs" elements in the two array constants, and returns a two dimensional array of results inside SUM like this:

If you have more than two criteria, consider a SUMPRODUCT formula as described here.

Cell reference for criteria

To use a cell reference for criteria, you can use an array formula like this:

Where range1 is the criteria range, and range2 contains criteria.

Wildcards and double-counting

COUNTIF and COUNTIFS support wildcards, but you need to be careful not to double count when you have multiple "contains" conditions with OR logic. See this example for more information

Sours: https://exceljet.net/formula/countifs-with-multiple-criteria-and-or-logic
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The COUNTIFS function applies criteria to cells across multiple ranges and counts the number of times all criteria are met.

Your browser does not support video.

This video is part of a training course called Advanced IF functions.

Syntax

COUNTIFS(criteria_range1, criteria1, [criteria_range2, criteria2]…)

The COUNTIFS function syntax has the following arguments:

  • criteria_range1    Required. The first range in which to evaluate the associated criteria.

  • criteria1    Required. The criteria in the form of a number, expression, cell reference, or text that define which cells will be counted. For example, criteria can be expressed as 32, ">32", B4, "apples", or "32".

  • criteria_range2, criteria2, ...    Optional. Additional ranges and their associated criteria. Up to 127 range/criteria pairs are allowed.

Important: Each additional range must have the same number of rows and columns as the criteria_range1 argument. The ranges do not have to be adjacent to each other.

Remarks

  • Each range's criteria is applied one cell at a time. If all of the first cells meet their associated criteria, the count increases by 1. If all of the second cells meet their associated criteria, the count increases by 1 again, and so on until all of the cells are evaluated.

  • If the criteria argument is a reference to an empty cell, the COUNTIFS function treats the empty cell as a 0 value.

  • You can use the wildcard characters— the question mark (?) and asterisk (*) — in criteria. A question mark matches any single character, and an asterisk matches any sequence of characters. If you want to find an actual question mark or asterisk, type a tilde (~) before the character.

Example 1

Copy the example data in the following tables, and paste it in cell A1 of a new Excel worksheet. For formulas to show results, select them, press F2, and then press Enter. If you need to, you can adjust the column widths to see all the data.

Salesperson

Exceeded Q1 quota

Exceeded Q2 quota

Exceeded Q3 quota

Davidoski

Yes

No

No

Burke

Yes

Yes

No

Sundaram

Yes

Yes

Yes

Levitan

No

Yes

Yes

Formula

Description

Result

=COUNTIFS(B2:D2,"=Yes")

Counts how many times Davidoski exceeded a sales quota for periods Q1, Q2, and Q3 (only in Q1).

1

=COUNTIFS(B2:B5,"=Yes",C2:C5,"=Yes")

Counts how many salespeople exceeded both their Q1 and Q2 quotas (Burke and Sundaram).

2

=COUNTIFS(B5:D5,"=Yes",B3:D3,"=Yes")

Counts how many times Levitan and Burke exceeded the same quota for periods Q1, Q2, and Q3 (only in Q2).

1

Example 2

Data

1

5/1/2011

2

5/2/2011

3

5/3/2011

4

5/4/2011

5

5/5/2011

6

5/6/2011

Formula

Description

Result

=COUNTIFS(A2:A7,"<6",A2:A7,">1")

Counts how many numbers between 1 and 6 (not including 1 and 6) are contained in cells A2 through A7.

4

=COUNTIFS(A2:A7, "<5",B2:B7,"<5/3/2011")

Counts how many rows have numbers that are less than 5 in cells A2 through A7, and also have dates that are are earlier than 5/3/2011 in cells B2 through B7.

2

=COUNTIFS(A2:A7, "<" & A6,B2:B7,"<" & B4)

Same description as the previous example, but using cell references instead of constants in the criteria.

2

Need more help?

You can always ask an expert in the Excel Tech Community or get support in the Answers community.

See Also

To count cells that aren't blank, use the COUNTA function

To count cells using a single criteria, use the COUNTIF function

The SUMIF function adds only the values that meet a single criteria

The SUMIFS function adds only the values that meet multiple criteria

IFS function (Microsoft 365, Excel 2016 and later)

Overview of formulas in Excel

How to avoid broken formulas

Detect errors in formulas

Statistical functions

Excel functions (alphabetical)

Excel functions (by Category)

Sours: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/countifs-function-dda3dc6e-f74e-4aee-88bc-aa8c2a866842
How to use COUNTIF and COUNTIFS in Microsoft Excel

How to countif with multiple criteria in Excel?


Countif with multiple criteria in same column


Count cells with multiple criteria based on text value

For example, I have the following data which contains some products, and now I need to count the number of KTE and KTO which are populated in the same column, see screenshot:

To get the number of KTE and KTO, please enter this formula:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$A$15,"KTE")+COUNTIF($A$2:$A$15,"KTO")

And then press Enter key to get the number of these two products. See screenshot:

Notes:

1. In the above formula: A2:A15 is the data range that you want to use, KTE and KTO are the criteria that you want to count.

2. If there are more than two criteria that you want to count in one column, just use =COUNTIF(range1, criteria1) + COUNTIF(range2, criteria2) + COUNTIF(range3, criteria3)+…

  • Tips:
  • Another compact formula also can help you to solve this problem: =SUMPRODUCT(COUNTIF($A$2:$A$15,{"KTE";"KTO"})), and then press Enter key to get the result.
  • And you can add the criteria just as =SUMPRODUCT(COUNTIF(range,{ "criteria1";"criteria2";"criteria3";"criteria4"…})).


Count cells with multiple criteria between two values

If you need to count the number of cells that the value is between two given numbers, how to solve this job in Excel?

Take the below screenshot as an example, I want to get the result of the number that is between 200 and 500. Please do with these formulas:

Enter this formula into a blank cell where you want to locate the result:

=COUNTIF($B$2:$B$15,">200")-COUNTIF($B$2:$B$15,">500")

And then press Enter key to get the result as you need, see screenshot:

Note: In the above formula:

  • B2:B15is the cell range that you want to use, >200 and >500 are the criteria you want to count the cells;
  • the whole formula means, to find the number of cells that have a value greater than 200 and then subtract the count of cells with a value greater than 500.
  • Tips:
  • You can also apply the COUNTIFS function to deal with this task, please type this formula: =COUNTIFS($B$2:$B$15,">200",$B$2:$B$15,"<500"), and then press Enter key to get the result.
  • And you can add the criteria just as =COUNTIFS(range1,"criteria1",range2,"criteria2",range3,"criteria3",...).

Count cells with multiple criteria between two dates

To count the cells based on date range, the COUNTIF and COUNTIFS functions can do you a favor as well.

For example, I want to count the cell numbers that the date is between 5/1/2019 and 8/1/2019 in a column, please do as this:

Enter the below formula into a blank cell:

=COUNTIFS($B$2:$B$15, ">=5/1/2019", $B$2:$B$15, "<=8/1/2019")

And then press Enter key to get the count number, see screenshot:

Note: In the above formula:

  • B2:B15 is the cell range that you want to use;
  • >=5/1/2018 and <=8/1/2019 are the date criteria you want to count the cells;

Click to know more about the COUNTIF function...



Countif with multiple criteria in same column with a useful feature

If you have Kutools for Excel, with its Select Specific Cells feature, you can quickly select the cells with specific text or cells between two numbers or dates, and then get the number you need.

Tips:To apply this Select Specific Cells feature, firstly, you should download the Kutools for Excel, and then apply the feature quickly and easily.

After installing Kutools for Excel, please do as this:

1. Select the list of cells that you want to count cells based on criteria, and then click Kutools > Select > Select Specific Cells, see screenshot:

2. In the Select Specific Cells dialog box, please set the operations as you need, and then click OK, the specific cells have been selected and the number of the cells are shown in the prompt box as below screenshots shown:

Note: This feature also can help you to select and count the cells between two specific numbers or dates as the following screenshots shown:

Download and free trial Kutools for Excel Now!


Countif with multiple criteria in multiple columns

If there are multiple criteria in multiple columns, such as following screenshot shown, and I want to get the number of KTE whose order is greater than 300 and the name is Ruby.

Please type this formula into the desired cell:

=COUNTIFS($A$2:$A$15,"KTE",$B$2:$B$15,">300",$C$2:$C$15,"Ruby")

and then press Enter key to get the number of KTE which you need.

Notes:

1. A2:A15 and KTE are the first range and criterion you need, B2:B15 and >300are the second range and criterion you need, and the C2:C15 and Ruby are the third range and criterion you based on.

2. If there are more criteria you need based on, you just need to add the range and criteria within the formula, such as: =COUNTIFS(range1, criteria1, range2, criteria2, range3, criteria3, range4, criteria4, … )

  • Tips:
  • Here is another formula also can help you: =SUMPRODUCT(--($A$2:$A$15="KTE"),--($B$2:$B$15>300),--($C$2:$C$15="Ruby")), and then press Enter key to get the result.

Click to know more about the COUNTIFS function...


More relative count cells articles:

  • Countif To Calculate The Percentage In Excel
  • For example, I have a summary report of a research paper, and there are three options A, B, C, now I want to calculate the percentage of each these three options. That is to say, I need to know the option A accounts for the percentage of all options.
  • Countif A Specific Value Across Multiple Worksheets
  • Supposing, I have multiple worksheets which contain the following data, and now, I want to get the number of occurrence of a specific value “Excel” from theses worksheets. How could I count specific values across multiple worksheet?
  • Countif Partial String/Substring Match In Excel
  • It’s easy to countif cells filled with certain strings, but do you know how to countif cells containing only partial string or substrings in Excel? This article will introduce a couple of methods to solve it quickly.
  • Count All Cells Except A Specific Value In Excel
  • If you have the word "Apple" scattered among a list of values, now, you just want to count the number of cells which are not "Apple" to get the following result. In this article, I will introduce some methods to solve this task in Excel.
  • Count Cells If One Of Multiple Criteria Met In Excel
  • The COUNTIF function will help us count cells containing one criterion, and the COUNTIFS function can help up count cells containing a set of conditions or criteria in Excel. What if counting cells if contains one of multiple criteria? Here I will share the ways to count cells if contain X or Y or Z … etc. in Excel.

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Multiple countif criteria with

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How to use COUNTIF and COUNTIFS in Microsoft Excel

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