1600cc air cooled vw engine

1600cc air cooled vw engine DEFAULT

We received a good lead-in question to the subject of engine upgrade - I'm doing a restoration of my '70 VW Bug. I'm wondering if you could explain to me how to upgrade the engine -- say from cc to cc. Will this give me better performance? How efficient will it be? Will a different carburetor be necessary? Will this swap/upgrade still work if I have a 6v system?

You can swap a smaller engine to a larger one - that's the easiest way. But if you have a cc engine, it's a little harder as things like the clutch might need changing when you put a larger engine in. The cc, cc and cc single port engines are almost identical, so swapping to a larger engine is easy if you have a cc or cc. You can buy brand new cc engines they were made in Mexico up until about , and they are supposed to be quite good engines.

The voltage is irrelevant, so long as the engine has the correct 6v components (coil, choke, generator and such). But changing from 6 volt to 12 volts is not too hard either.

So long as the engine case is in good condition, the cc pistons and cylinders will fit straight into the cc case - no alteration is needed. The outside diameter is the same but the cc walls are thinner, which is why VW never went higher than cc - the walls would be too thin and the case would have needed a slight redesign for larger diameter cylinders. More on this later.

Note: You should also note that the '65 case had the head bolts screwed directly into the soft magnesium alloy case material, so you might need to have case savers inserted into the case, especially if you are increasing its capacity. Case savers are threaded collars which increase the amount of thread grabbing the soft engine case material, so they are much less likely to pull the threads loose.

Engine Case and Cylinder Heads

Making your current VW engine larger is reasonably easy because the cylinders are separate from the engine case. Four separate cylinders sit in 4 separate holes in the sides of the case, and you can buy larger cylinders for the VW engine. Some larger sizes would need the case holes enlarged, but some will fit without altering the case at all.

The cc engine has a 64mm stroke crankshaft and 77mm bore cylinders. You can buy 83mm cylinders (a "big bore" kit) which have thinner walls (so the outside diameter is still the same) which will fit into the same holes in the case and give you about cc. These cylinders are not easy to find though - probably possible in Europe or the UK because a LOT of cc engines were used there, but not easy in other parts of the world.

The case for the cc/cc/cc engines is different to the cc engine and the enlarging process has more choices. All these engines use a 69mm stroke crankshaft, but different diameter cylinders. The cc engine has 77mm diameter cylinders, and either 83mm cc cylinders or mm cylinders will plug straight in - the holes in the case are the same size for all three cylinder sizes (the cylinder walls get thinner as the inside diameter increases).

The cc heads come in two varieties - single-port and dual-port. With single-port heads you can use the 30PICT/2 carburetor (usually NOT the 30PICT/1 - these carburetors does not come with a power jet and will run lean at high speeds with the larger engine capacity, which means that the engine will run hot. But later versions of this carburetor DO have the power jet, so if you can find one of those, they will work with a engine, though it's a little on the small side.

You can leave the cooling system untouched, although upgrading to the doghouse cooling system would be a good idea, since a larger capacity means more heat, and you have to get rid of it somehow. Upgrading to the doghouse cooler is not a technically difficult thing to do - you just need the right parts.

If you go for the dual-port cc heads, you have to change the inlet manifold to the three-piece dual-port version, the carburetor to a 34PICT/3 (or use the H30/31 with a 30/34 adaptor), and also change the tinware over the cylinders which has the larger dual-port holes for the inlet manifold.

The cc dual-port upgrade will also require upgrade of the oil cooler and fan shroud (see below). Thus the cc single-port upgrade is a less work that the dual-port upgrade.

To get larger sizes than cc, you have to use aftermarket larger cylinders - 87mm for cc, 88mm for cc, 92mm for and 94mm for cc (all using the stock 69mm crankshaft). You can also use a longer stroke crankshaft - 74mm and 78mm are readily available, so when you use these with the larger cylinders you get even larger capacities.

The 87mm (cc) cylinders have thin walls so they might warp and twist after a short time. The original 88mm (cc) "slip in" cylinders were even worse - the cylinder walls were almost paper thin. But, there is a modern solution you can also get 88mm machine-in (thick walled) cylinders. These are stepped, thin at the bottom to fit straight into the unaltered case, but nice thick walls up to the heads, so just the heads need machining to fit over the wider cylinder tops. These are described and "machine-in" 88s. The thin-walled 87 and 88mm cylinders will last for a while, but it's common for them to warp after a while, so the should be viewed with some suspcion. The 88 Machine-in cylinders will last as long as the original mm () cylinders. For larger capacities, The case needs machining to fit the larger 92 or 94mm cylinders to get either or ccboth of these sizes are quite popular.

Compression Ratio

If you leave increase the engine to cc, but use the heads (machined to fit over the larger diameter cylinder tops), you'll get a compression ratio of about (larger cylinder volume squeezed into the same head space) which is rather high - you'd need to run about 98RON Octane (about 95AKI in the USA) fuel. But if you also fit a set of cc heads, the compression ratio drops back to a normal and you can use the normal 91RON octane (87AKI in the USA) fuel.

The cc heads are almost exclusively single-port heads in the US, although the cc (with twin port heads from 71 onwards) continued to be sold in other parts of the world as a popular option to the /cc engines. From they had a cc twin-port engine using a 31PICT/3 carburettor, so it IS possible to get twin-port cc heads which give a higher compression ratio when used with cc pistons and cylinders.

Horsepower

The inevitable question - How much more horsepower will I get? For example, with the single-port cc upgrade to cc, you'll get a useful increase in horsepower from 44 to about 56hp, or maybe 58hp if you use the higher compression cc heads. Same with the enigne, upgrading ton cylinders will give you an increase from 63hp to about hp. You'll get fractionally more hp with the H30/31 carburetor replacing the older 30 series carburetor - it has a larger throat. But any increase in performance is limited by the diameter of the inlet manifold. Those increases in horsepower are very noticable in such a light vehicle, so make sure your brakes are up to the job!

Carburetor and Distributor

Then you have to consider the carburetor and distributor.

If you have a cc engine which had the 28PCI or later 28PICT carburettor, you can get a new H30/31 carburetor to replace the 28 series, or use the 30PICT and 30PICT/2 used on cc and cc engines, or the 31PICT/3 used on Euro twin port engines. All the 28, 30, and 31 series carburettors fit on the smaller manifold. The 30 or 31 series carburettors will give you a little more horsepower without changing anything else, as they have slightly larger throats, but dont expect miracles.

You can use the H30/31 carburettor on any size from cc to cc and it will work well, so long as you alter the jet sizes to suit the airflow of the different sized engines. It fits the single port manifold, and can also be used on the larger cc dual-port manifold if you use a 30/34mm adaptor (which usually comes in the box with the new H30/31). A word of warning (two actually)The H30/31 has a low vacuum signal so vacuum distributors can struggle to pull in any/all the vacuum advance, so it's common to use a distributor with this carburettor, which brings on it's own problems. The H/1 also comes with VERY lean jetting (an emissions thing) which can make it very difficult to tune and to keep in tune. Often a change of jetting to suit the engine size it's used on is needed to make it work well and stay in tune.

The more usual carburettor for the cc twin port engine is the larger 34PICT/3 carburettor and you can still buy these brand new. It fits directly on the larger-flange twin port manifold. You can also use this on a engine, but for anything larger you really need larger twin carburettors - kadrons for example.

In all cases use a single-vacuum double-advance (SVDA) distributor for best performance and best economy - the distributor works okay, but it was originally designed for constant speed industrial engines (compressors, generators, etc. which VW made millions of) and is NOT best suited to road work. With the you can often end up with the stumbles on acceleration (called the " flat spot" or " stumbles"), and the engine will run under-advanced at higher speeds, which runs the engine a little hotter than it needs to. You'll use more fuel with a distributor too. There is more on that on our articles on the distributor.

Oil Cooler

The , cc, and single port engines use the old style in-shroud oil cooler, which is JUST adequate for the cc single-port engine. But if you go for the dual-port version, the in-shroud oil cooler is marginal, and you'd also then be better off changing to the doghouse style cooling system -- wider fan, cooling shroud with the doghouse and exit ducting, standoff oil cooler and adaptor plate, front tinware with the rectangular hole for used oil cooler air, and a slotted engine lid or some other form of increased air inlet above the engine for the higher cooling airflow (see below). When fitting the oil cooler to the cc or cc case you must use stepped sealing grommets as the those single-port cases have smaller oil galleries than the standoff oil cooler mounting plate.

Increasing Cooling Air Flow

The doghouse cooling fan produces about 10% more cooling airflow - up from 22cf/sec to 25cf/sec - and needs additional inlet area. The under-window slots are NOT enough once the speed is above about 50mph, and the doghouse fan will start running short of cooling air, so the engine will get hot. The pre 68 solid (no slots) engine lid cannot be swapped for a '68+ slotted style (the shape is different), but if you can find a "2-slot" Cabrio lid from the same era (Cabrios did not have any under-window air slots and used a slotted engine lid instead) that will help a lot. Otherwise you need standoff hinges (which can look ugly but do work), or standoff licence plate mounts with a rectangular hole cut in the lid behind, or slots cut in the sides of the engine bay inside the rear fenders/mud guards. You could also graft slots into the existing lid - perhaps using parts of the Kombi front air grill. These would still be genuine VW and look rather early-Porsche since the slots are vertical rather than horizontal, but of course the car would lose a little of it's "sleeper" look if that's what you wanted.)

Engine fitment

The four mounting bolts for the beetle engine remained the same through it's development, so any engine will bolt up to any transaxle. BUT, the 6 volt engines used a tooth flywheel, where the 12 volt engines use a tooth flywheel which is about 3mm larger in diameter. That means the larger flywheel will touch the bottom two mounting bolt tunnels in the bell housing, so a little grinding of the tunnels nearest to the engine is needed.

Clutch plates changed over the years too. The used a mm flywheel, which WILL survive with a cc engine (the semi-auto uses the mm clutch), but wont survive hard launches and of course it is likely to wear faster. The mm clutch came with and larger engines. The look of the pressure plate changed too - the original style has three large "fingers" and 9 coil springs around the perimeter providing the pressure. The later style pressure plate is a diaphragm style with multiple small metal fingers facing the centre. The new style is a direct replacement for the old style shape. Then in about , the release bearing (throwout bearing) style (and clutch plate) changed. The earlier style release bearing has round mounting ears and simple round shaped clips holding it to the operating arm. The operating arm has round shaped hooks to hold the realease bearing. The clutch pressure plate for this style MUST have a metal ring in the middle of the metal fingers. The later style release bearing has square shaped ears and complex wire clips, and the clutch pressure plate has bare metal fingers. The pressure plates are identical apart from that metal ring, but the pressure plate MUST match the release bearing style - round ears = metal ring in the pressure platesquare ears = bare metal fingers in the pressure plate. If course the operating arm changed to suit the square shaped ears on the release bearing too.

Bottom Line

As you can see there are lots of possibilities and you really need to decide how much you are prepared to spend - then perhaps speak to a local VW enthusiast so you can work out the easiest way to get what you want.

Oh - and don't forget that when you increase the performance of the engine you MUST also make sure your tyres, brakes and suspension are in the best condition, or (better still) upgraded too.

We have received a few questions on engine interchangeability that evoked some great responses from Rob -

A question - I have a ‘64 Beetle; the only reusable parts out of it are the motor and transaxle. I think the motor is a cc. My dad works with someone who has a ‘74 Super Beetle without the motor. I was wondering if I could switch the motor and the transaxle out of the ’64 and into the ’74 SB. If I did that would I be able to keep the original Super Beetle axles or would I have to keep the axles with the ‘64 motor?

Rob responded - Almost any VW engine will plug into almost any transmission, so the general answer is "yes" -- that engine will fit, but it may not work. Read on.

The 64 engine will bolt up to the 74 transmission, but the 64 engine is 6 volt with a toth flywheel and that wont suit the 12 volt starter in the 74 bug - you'd have to change the flywheel for th later tooth version, or change the starter in the 74 bug to a 6 volt version to suit the tooth flywheel. The pinion bearing needs changing then too - the shaft diameters for the two starters are different. The 6 volt starter will survive for years on 12 volts so long as you dont crank continuously for more than a few seconds - it will get hot faster than the 12 volt starter. The 74 gearing is not ideal for the engine - you'll spend more time in the lower gears, and it might stuggle just a little in top gear, so you'll be using 3rd gear a lot around town. The clutch plate might need alterning too - read the info above on clutch plate changes.

You can get a lot of information about what sort of engine it is by looking at a few features.

First -- the engine number. The initial letter tells you what the engine was originally -- D - ; H - ; B - single port ( USA only engine); AB, AC - dual port (not seen much in the USA); AD, AE, AH, AS - various forms of the dual port.

For more information on engine types, have a look at our article on The VW Beetle -- Changes Through the Years -- this article gives a complete listing of engine and chassis numbers.

The early (pre-‘71) engines have only one pressure relief valve at the rear of the case -- have a look under the rear (pulley end) of the case for a larger aluminium plug with a screw driver slot in it - about an inch in diameter. ALL VW engines have this plug. Now look in the same place at the front (flywheel ) end of the engine. If it's an early engine case, there will be no matching plug there, but the later cases have the extra plug.

Since any of the /cc engine cases can very easily converted to cc and you can't see anything from the outside, the only way to check the real capacity is to remove a head and measure the piston tops -- 77mm for cc and cc single-port engines (different crankshafts), 83mm for cc engines, and for cc engines.

The transmission is a different matter. If your ‘74 has double-joint rear axles (IRS) with a constant-velocity (CV) joint at either end of the stub axle, then you must use a "one sided" gearbox for a replacement. "One sided" means that only one side of the transmission case has a removable plate around the axle -- the swing axle cases have a removable plate on both sides of the case, and these can only be used with swing axles.

So it's highly likely that your ‘64 case cannot be used in the ‘74 car, and you can't (without a LOT of trouble) convert a later IRS suspension back to a swing axle suspension (your question about using the ‘64 suspension).

If the transmission in the ‘74 is OK, then the engine (whatever it is) will plug into the transmission, but there might be a problem if it really is a ‘64 type engine.

The earlier engines have a different main seal arrangement behind the flywheel, and since you CAN’T use a 6-volt ('64) flywheel) in a volt Bug you may not be able to make it all work unless you can convert the starter back to a 6-volt unit (which will survive quite okay for many years on volt).

The early engines used a metal/paper seal behind the flywheel, and the later (after about '65) engine have a rubber ring around the shaft and a larger oil seal outside of that.

The clutch throwout bearing is different too. The early throwout bearings have rounded ears holding the bearing in place and these use a clutch plate which has a metal ring in the middle of the clutch fingers. The later style (from about ‘71 onwards, have a throwout bearing with flat ears and these have no ring in the middle of the clutch plate -- the fingers are bare.

So although the engine will fit, the clutch may not be compatible without changing some components.

And another thing -- if the engine is a ‘64 model, the clutch is a mm version. The /cc cars use a mm clutch. The smaller clutch CAN be used with a cc engine (it is used on the cc semi-autos) but it won't last as long, and you'd need to be kind to it -- no hard launches.

Lastly - is the engine in the ‘64 a doghouse engine? That is, does it have a box-like structure on the outside front (front is front of car) of the fan shroud, on the left side, or is the front of the fan shroud flat from one side to the other?

The ‘71 and later cars are all designed to have the doghouse engine for better cooling. If your engine is the earlier variety it would still work, but pushing the heavier ‘74 body around it will be working harder than it was designed for and you might get overheating problems.

Another question - I recently bought a rebuilt "long block" via the Internet, and made the mistake of thinking the engine that was in my son's '68 bus was "stock". What we have is engine type "AD", dual port -- apparently The carburetor is Solex 30/31 PICT.

The engine we received is what SHOULD have been there -- a single port. While it has no engine ID stamped, it has all the earmarks of a Type 3. The vendor says that as well.

Rather than pay shipping to send it back I'm looking to see if we can adapt the carburetor to a single port manifold or do we need a different carburetor AND manifold? Also, are the flywheels are interchangable?

Rob responded - The H30/31 carburetor has a small flange so it can directly replace the 28 and 30 series carburetors, which use the small flange manifold. From ‘71 onwards a larger flange manifold was used which suits the 34PICT/3 carburetor (for the cc engines) and the 31PICT carburetor (used on cc engines and very common in Europe).

The H30/31 carburetor can be used with a dual-port or any large flange engine by sitting it on a 30/34 adaptor (available at any VW shop). (Or if I am wrong and it has the larger flange it will sit DIRECTLY on the large flange manifolds).

If it's a ''71 Type 3 engine, the flywheels should be the same -- both later Type 3 and ''71 Bus flywheels are volt ( tooth) and have a mm clutch.

Some earlier Type 3 engines ('65/'66) were 6-volt ( teeth) but still had the mm clutch, and this one can NOT be used in your '68 Bus unless you convert the starter and pinion bearing to the 6-volt variety (which will survive happily on volt if needed - that's common practice with converting 6-volt Bugs/Buses to volt).

I have a cc dual port engine in my ’68 Bug, with a 30PICT/2 carburetor sitting on a 30/34 adaptor so it works with the dual port manifold.

There is no problem in using this Type 3 case in a Bug -- the only "curious" part is the missing dip stick hole, but yours probably now has a plastic fitting on the back of the case (close to the original position) for one -- that's how they usually do it with the Type 3 case.

Sours: http://www.vw-resource.com/engine_interchangeability.html

Volkswagen air-cooled engine

German automotive engine

Motor vehicle engine

The Volkswagen air-cooled engine is an air-cooled, gasoline-fuelled, boxer engine with four horizontally opposed cast-iron cylinders, cast aluminum alloy cylinder heads and pistons, magnesium-alloy crankcase, and forged steel crankshaft and connecting rods.

Variations of the engine were produced by Volkswagen plants worldwide from until for use in Volkswagen's own vehicles, notably the Type 1 (Beetle), Type 2 (bus, transporter), Type 3, and Type 4. Additionally, the engines were widely used in industrial, light aircraft and kit car applications.

Type 1: – litres[edit]

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Volkswagen engine
Production

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Like the Volkswagen Beetle produced after the war, the first Volkswagen Transporters (bus) used the Volkswagen air-cooled engine, a &#;litre, DIN-rated 18&#;kW (24 PS, 24&#;bhp), air-cooled four-cylinder "boxer" engine mounted in the rear. The kilowatt (29 PS; 29&#;bhp) version became standard in , while an unusual early version of the engine which developed 25 kilowatts (34 PS; 34&#;bhp) debuted exclusively on the Volkswagen Type 2 (T1) in Any examples that retain that early engine today are true survivors – since the engine was totally discontinued at the outset, no parts were ever made available.

The second-generation Transporter, the Volkswagen Type 2 (T2) employed a slightly larger version of the engine with &#;litres and 35 kilowatts (48&#;PS; 47&#;bhp).

A "T2b" Type 2 was introduced by way of gradual change over three years. The Type 2 featured a new, litre engine, now with dual intake ports on each cylinder head, and was DIN-rated at 37 kilowatts (50&#;PS; 50&#;bhp).

The Volkswagen Type 3 (saloon/sedan, notch-back, fastback) was initially equipped with a litre engine, displacing 1, cubic centimetres (&#;cu&#;in), based on the air-cooled flat-4 found in the Type 1. While the long block remained the same as the Type 1, the engine cooling was redesigned reducing the height of the engine profile, allowing greater cargo volume, and earning the nicknames of "Pancake" or "Suitcase" engine. This engine's displacement would later increase to &#;litres.

Originally a single- or dual-carburetor litre engine (N, 33 kilowatts (45&#;PS; 44&#;bhp) or S, 40 kilowatts (54&#;PS; 54&#;bhp)), the Type 3 engine received a larger displacement ( litres) and modified in to include BoschD-Jetronic electronic fuel injection as an option, making it the first mass-production consumer cars with such a feature (some sports/luxury cars with limited production runs previously had fuel injection).

[edit]

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[edit]

The litre engine is called Typ and has a displacement of 1,&#;cc (&#;cu&#;in).[1] As industrial engine, its rated power is &#;kW (31&#;PS; 31&#;bhp) at &#;min−1 without a governor, the highest torque &#;N⋅m (60&#;lbf⋅ft) at &#;min−1. With a governor set to 8% accuracy, the rated power is &#;kW (29&#;bhp; 29&#;PS) at &#;min−1, the highest torque is &#;N⋅m (51&#;lbf⋅ft) at &#;min−1.[2] For other applications, the power and torque output may vary, e.g. On the Beetle produced 41&#;PS (40&#;bhp; 30&#;kW) at rpm and 88&#;N⋅m (65&#;lbf⋅ft) of torque at rpm.[5]

[edit]

cc Single port , type 1, beetle only. With Higher compression, it developed 50 bhp. It was a problematic engine, and so only used in the north American market in type 2 vehicles for model year

[edit]

cc Single port only. Similar to the except the bore was increased to 83&#;mm. The cylinder head was modified slightly with a larger opening in order to accommodate the larger cylinder diameter.

[edit]

The &#;l engine is called Typ It has a displacement of &#;cm3. Was based on the with the cylinder bore increased to &#;mm. The stroke remained unchanged at 69&#;mm.

Single port

The single port was used on the following models:

Dual Port

The dual port was used on the following models:

Type 4: – litres[edit]

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

Motor vehicle engine

In , Volkswagen introduced a new vehicle, the Volkswagen Type 4. The model , and later the model , offered many new features to the Volkswagen lineup. The Type 4 came out with a new larger, heavier, stronger and more powerful engine based on the same design as previous aircooled engines but was physically larger in size and external dimensions. It was called the and had a 90&#;mm bore with a 66&#;mm stroke (&#;cc). Most parts are not interchangeable with earlier engines.

While the VW was discontinued in when sales dropped, its engine continued as the VW Bus power plant for Volkswagen Type 2s produced from to it continued in modified form in the later Vanagon which was air-cooled from until mid

Litre – The Type 4 engine was also used on the Volkswagen version of the Porsche Volkswagen versions originally came with an 80 horsepower (60&#;kW) fuel-injected litre flat-4 engine based on the Volkswagen air-cooled engine. In Europe, the four-cylinder cars were sold as Volkswagen-Porsches, at Volkswagen dealerships; while, in North America all 's were marketed as Porsches. Porsche referred to their version of the Type 4 engine using the litre designation and not cc's (i.e.: not like VW). One visual difference is that all Porsche Type 4 engines have the oil dip-stick and oil fill mounted on top of the engine (where the VW Type 2 engine application has the dip-stick mounted on the rear of the engine by way of a long oil fill tube).

Litre – Porsche discontinued the /6 variant in after production of 3, units; its place in the lineup was filled by a variant powered by a new 95 metric horsepower (70&#;kW; 94&#;bhp) (USA)/85 metric horsepower (63&#;kW; 84&#;bhp)(CA)/ metric horsepower (74&#;kW; 99&#;bhp)(ROW) litre fuel-injected version of Volkswagen's Type 4 engine in This engine used a longer 71&#;mm stroke crankshaft, new rod bearings and new pistons to increase the cylinder bore to 94&#;mm. This revision was designed by Porsche and later also used in the VW Type 2. Porsche production ended in The litre engine continued to be used in the Porsche E, which provided an entry-level model until the Porsche was introduced in

Litre – For , the 's litre engine was replaced by a 76 metric horsepower (56&#;kW; 75&#;bhp) litre, and the new Bosch L-Jetronic fuel injection system was added to American units to help with emissions control. A cylinder bore increase to 93&#;mm was made to the otherwise unchanged litre engine block.

For the Volkswagen Type 2, 's most prominent change was a bigger engine compartment to fit the larger to litre engines from the Volkswagen Type 4, and a redesigned rear end which eliminated the removable rear apron. The air inlets were also enlarged to accommodate the increased cooling air needs of the larger engines.

This all-new, larger engine is commonly called the Type 4 engine as opposed to the previous Type 1 engine first introduced in the Type 1 Beetle. This engine was called "Type 4" because it was originally designed for the Type 4 ( and ) automobiles. There is no "Type 2 engine", because those vehicles did not feature new engine designs when introduced. They used the "Type 1" engine from the Beetle with minor modifications such as rear mount provisions and different cooling shroud arrangements,[citation needed]

In the Type 2, the Volkswagen Type 4 engine was an option from This engine was standard in models destined for the US and Canada. Only with the Type 4 engine did an automatic transmission become available for the first time in Both engines displaced &#;litres, rated at 66 metric horsepower (49&#;kW; 65&#;bhp) with the manual transmission, and 62 metric horsepower (46&#;kW; 61&#;bhp) with the automatic. The Type 4 engine was enlarged to &#;litres and 68 metric horsepower (50&#;kW; 67&#;bhp) in , and again to &#;litres and 70 metric horsepower (51&#;kW; 69&#;bhp) in As with all Transporter engines, the focus in development was not on power, but on low-end torque. The Type 4 engines were considerably more robust and durable than the Type 1 engines, particularly in Transporter service.

The engine that superseded the Type 4 engine in the late VW Bus retained Volkswagen Type 1 architecture, yet featured water-cooled cylinder heads and cylinder jackets. The wasserboxer, Volkswagen terminology for a water-cooled, opposed-cylinder (flat or 'boxer engine') was subsequently discontinued in with the introduction of the Eurovan.

Other applications[edit]

Beginning in , Dunn-Right Incorporated of Anderson, South Carolina has made a kit to perform the conversion of a VW engine to a compressor.[6]

Industrial[edit]

Volkswagen AG has officially offered these air-cooled boxer engines for use in industrial applications since , lately under its Volkswagen Industrial Motor brand. Available in 18 kilowatts (24&#;PS; 24&#;bhp), 22 kilowatts (30&#;PS; 30&#;bhp), 25 kilowatts (34&#;PS; 34&#;bhp), 31 kilowatts (42&#;PS; 42&#;bhp), 33 kilowatts (45&#;PS; 44&#;bhp) and 46 kilowatts (63&#;PS; 62&#;bhp) outputs, from displacements of litres (73&#;cu&#;in) to litres (&#;cu&#;in), these Industrial air-cooled engines were officially discontinued in [citation needed]

Aircraft[edit]

The air-cooled opposed four-cylinder Beetle engines have been used for other purposes as well. Limbach Flugmotoren has since produced more than certified aircraft engines based on the Beetle engine.[7][8][9][10] Sauer has since produced certified engines for small airplanes and motorgliders,[11] and is now also producing engines for the ultralight community in Europe.[12][13]

Especially interesting is its use as an experimental aircraft engine. This type of VW engine deployment started separately in Europe and in the US. In Europe this started in France straight after the Second World War using the engine in the Volkswagen Kübelwagen that were abandoned by the thousands in the country side[14] and peaked with the JPX engine.[15] In the US this started in the s when VW Beetle started to show up there.[14] A number of companies still produce aero engines that are Volkswagen Beetle engine derivatives: Limbach, Sauer, Hapi, Revmaster, Great Plains Type 1 Front Drive, Hummel, the AeroConversions AeroVee Engine, and others. Kit planes or plans built experimental aircraft were specifically designed to utilize these engines. The VW air-cooled engine does not require an expensive and often complex gear reduction unit to utilize a propeller at efficient cruise RPM. With its relative low cost and parts availability, many experimental aircraft are designed around the VW engines.[16][17]

Formula V Air Racing uses aircraft designed to get maximum performance out of a VW powered aircraft resulting in race speeds above &#;mph.[18]

Some aircraft that use the VW engine are:

Half VW[edit]

For aircraft use a number of experimenters seeking a small two-cylinder four-stroke engine began cutting Type 1 VW engine blocks in half, creating a two-cylinder, horizontally opposed engine. The resulting engine produces 30 to 38&#;hp (22 to 28&#;kW). Plans and kits have been made available for these conversions.[19][20]

One such conversion is the Carr Twin, designed by Dave Carr, introduced in January , in the Experimental Aircraft Association's Sport Aviation magazine. The design won the John Livingston Award for its outstanding contribution to low cost flying and also was awarded the Stan Dzik Memorial Award for outstanding design.[20]

Other examples include the Total Engine Concepts MM CB and Better Half VW.

Some aircraft that use the Half VW engine are:

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcDie Betriebsanleitung für den Volkswagen-Industriemotor Typ , Typ A. Volkswagen AG. Wolfsburg. March Page 29
  2. ^ abcÄnderungen nach August Nachtrag zur Betriebsanleitung des Industriemotors. August
  3. ^"Der Käfer – Eine Dokumentation Band 2" by A. Etzold, published by Motorbuch, Stuttgart in ISBN&#;
  4. ^"Das große Buch der Volkswagen-Typen" by Lothar Boschen, published by Motorbuch, Stuttgart in ISBN&#;
  5. ^" Volkswagen Beetle Technical Specifications and Dimensions". conceptcarz. Retrieved 29 October
  6. ^"Dunn-Right Incorporated". Dunn-Right Incorporated. n.d. Retrieved 16 January
  7. ^[1], Limbach L
  8. ^[2], Limbach L
  9. ^[3], Limbach L
  10. ^Limbach, Limbach Aero Engines
  11. ^Carat motorglider, Carat motorglider.
  12. ^Sauer Flugmotorenbau, Sauer Flugmotorenbau.
  13. ^Sauer in GroppoArchived 16 April at the Wayback Machine, Sauer in Groppo.
  14. ^ abEAA Webinar John Monnett, John Monnett.
  15. ^JPX, JPX
  16. ^"In North Kitsap, Turning Old Cars into New Planes". Kitsap Sun. 29 November
  17. ^Great Plans Aircraft Newsletter, Issue 3,
  18. ^Formula V Air Racing
  19. ^Millholland, L. E., and Graeme Gibson (November ). "The Better Half VW Engine – Engine Detail". Retrieved 26 May
  20. ^ abGreat Plains Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. (n.d.). "Type 1 – 1/2 VW Conversion Kit, Parts and Plans". Retrieved 14 May
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_air-cooled_engine
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VW cc Redline?

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Darren A. Asuncion

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Apr 29, , AM4/29/97

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Hi,

I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at. If it
matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.

Thanks in advance for the help.

-Darren Asuncion
[email protected]

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[email protected]

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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Darren A. Asuncion wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
> engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at.

If you look at the speedo, you will see small tickmarks on the outer
rim. These are the shift points for , , and upshifts.

Just not the RPM when the speedo is pointing at the shift mark, and that
will tell you what VW thought was the safest RPM at which to shift,
though it is probably pretty conservative.

> If it
> matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
> from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.

Why? The strainer has far more open area than the oil pickup, so it
doesn't restrict flow, the oil pickup will clog much more readily than
the strainer ever would, and the strainer protects the pump from
breakage by excluding everything that is too big for the pump to pass.

I can't think of any reason to go without the strainer, unless you like
to live dangerously.

George Lyle
--
Note: Return address altered to deflect junk e-mail.
Delete the leading "G" in the address when replying.

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Priit Pődra

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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"Darren A. Asuncion" <[email protected]> wrote:
>Hi,
>
>I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
>engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at.

The "official" red line for a stock engine is around
RPM.
I rev my stock engine with up to occasionally,
but I always feel bad about it.

Priit
MAD

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Chris Allen

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
>Hi,
>
>I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series

>engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at. If it


>matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
>from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.
>

Redline is somewhere around rpm. However, the cam (and stock carb,
exhaust) limits max power after rpm. Running a stock Type 1 past is
a waste of time. Put the screen back in. Removing it does nothing except to
remove another line of defense.

Chris

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Keith Park

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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the factory ignition cuts for the 77 bugs and busses (rotors) were at RPM

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davewave

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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to [email protected]


Darren A. Asuncion wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
> engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at. If it
> matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
> from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.
>

> Thanks in advance for the help.
>
> -Darren Asuncion
> [email protected]

Darren, max rpm for a stock is rpm. You can go over slightly,
but you'll have to be going downhill for this one. If you don't have a
counterweighted crank and weight balanced rods and pistons I would
suggest that you stay below rpm. If you don't give a damn and want
revs no matter what, what is limiting your rpms is the restrictive
intake and exhaust. Bolt on dual carbs and a header and you'll get more
power and higher rpms, but be careful of valve float.

Dave.

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[email protected]

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Apr 30, , AM4/30/97

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The owner's manual for my '71 Beetle says,

"You can drive your Volkswagen at full speed from the first day. There
are, however, certain permissible speed ranges for the various gears:

1st gear: 0 - 16mph
2nd gear: 12 - 34mph
3rd gear: 22 - 56mph
4th gear: 31 mph and up =


When a particular traffic situation makes it essential to move rapidly,
you can accelerate up to 37 mph in 2nd gear and up to 62 mph in 3rd gear
for brief periods only. Bear in mind, however, that full throttle
acceleration raises fuel consumption considerably. It is more economical
to drive smoothly and keep the speed fairly constant. Very fast,
racy-sporty driving, alternating between full throttle and hard braking
will mean more frequent visits to a gas station and increased tire and
brake lining wear.

You can drive very economically between:

12 and 28 mph in 2nd gear
22 and 44 mph in 3rd gear
31 and 62 mph in 4th gear"

Enjoy :)

Lenny D.

=80 DO NOT SEND JUNK
E-MAIL: =

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a =80
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MARC TOUSSAINT

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May 1, , AM5/1/97

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to [email protected]


Darren A. Asuncion wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
> engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at. If it
> matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
> from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.
>
> Thanks in advance for the help.
>
> -Darren Asuncion
> [email protected]

Put that strainer back in there right away. Dont take advice from that
guy again. the strainer goes a long way in protecting that expensive
oil pump.
--
marc toussaint
http://www.angelfire.com/biz/slugbug
slugbug - parts and restoration vw parts hotline:
Luke Street #
Irving, Tx
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vw_nut

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May 1, , AM5/1/97

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Reply to: [email protected](vw_nut)

Responding to: [email protected] (Chris Allen)

><[email protected]>In article <[email protected]>, dasu


>>Hi,
>>
>>I just installed a VDO tach on my cc 71 Superbeetle (AE series
>>engine), and I was wondering what the engine redlines at. If it
>>matters, I have an oil pump w/ filter, and the strainer removed (on tip
>>from another VW personis this okay?), and everything else is stock.
>>

>Redline is somewhere around rpm. However, the cam (and stock carb,
>exhaust) limits max power after rpm. Running a stock Type 1 past is
>a waste of time. Put the screen back in. Removing it does nothing except to
>remove another line of defense.
>
>Chris

Thats a darn good answer! I believe it's something like.. within RPM
of a redlined engine power drops off conciderably That is why almost EVERY
stock car racer shifts rpm above shift point.. the car tends to drop off
in power a little and instead of short shifting into a lower power band.. they
shift later, just about when the MEAT of the power is for the next gear
Besides with VW engines being air cooled and all.. Do you really wanna take the
engine to it's limits only to force it to go back???

Vw Nut

Origin: Mike's Mess * * @FILEnet

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