Acura ilx 2013 premium package

Acura ilx 2013 premium package DEFAULT

2.4L w/Premium Package 4dr Sedan
2013 Acura ILX Specs

Interior
Front head room38 "
Rear head room36 "
Front shoulder room56 "
Rear shoulder room54 "
Front hip room50 "
Rear hip room52 "
Front leg room42.3 "
Rear leg room34.0 "
Luggage capacity12.3 cu.ft.
Maximum cargo capacity12.3 cu.ft.
Standard seating5
Exterior
Length179.1 "
Body width70.6 "
Body height55.6 "
Wheelbase105.1 "
Ground clearance4.4 "
Curb2,978 lbs.
Gross weight3,968 lbs.
Fuel
Fuel tank capacity13.2 gal.
EPA mileage estimates22 City / 31 Hwy
Performance
Base engine size2.4 liters
Base engine typeI-4
Horsepower201 hp
Horsepower rpm7,000
Torque170 lb-ft.
Torque rpm4,400
Drive typefront-wheel
Turning radius18.1 ''
Show More
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Sours: https://www.autoblog.com/buy/2013-Acura-ILX-2.4L_w_Premium_Package__4dr_Sedan/specs/

Months in Fleet: 17 months
Current Mileage: 40,106 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 28 mpg
Average Range: 356 miles
Service: $620
Normal Wear: $0
Repair: $0
Damage and Destruction: $181

When Acura’s ILX sports sedan arrived for 2013, we harbored few hopes that it would be a new-age Integra. We did figure at least one version would be fun, an expectation that sprung from the existence of the effervescent 201-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder and six-speed manual on the powertrain roster. It’s the same pairing as found on Honda’s Civic Si, and we figured that such an ILX would combine the bubbly personality of the Si with the interior comforts that accompany Acura badging. We were right, although that doesn’t tell the whole story.

Zing Zing Zing

In the ILX lineup, the 2.4 is available only with a stick, and not one logbook entry failed to heap praise on the rev-happy four-banger or the smooth-shifting gearbox. We loved popping into the compact sedan for jaunts around Ann Arbor, largely because of this powertrain combo. And, thankfully, that sticky feeling in the transmission we reported in the last update can be chalked up to cold weather—shift feel was as slick as ever once temperatures returned to what Michiganders refer to as mild.

KERIAN

The yin to the ILX’s charming about-town yang is its childish behavior on the freeway. At highway speeds, the car’s short gearing and lack of taller overdrive ratios keeps the 2.4-liter turning well north of 3000 rpm in sixth gear. A number of logbook scribblers admitted to reaching for a taller gear on the interstate, only to discover they were already in sixth. Such engine drone—not to mention the ample volumes of road and wind noise—is awfully unbecoming of a model from a luxury brand, even one touted as a junior sports sedan.

Even when emphasizing the “junior” in junior sports sedan, the ILX never quite lived up to expectations. The Acura’s electric power steering is parking-lot light at initial turn-in but then loads up unnervingly as input is added. Quick changes in direction are met by slow responses from the combination of steering, suspension, and tires, and it’s not long before requests and the car’s reactions are out of sync.

However, the ILX showed improvement in some performance metrics as its stay with us wore on. Braking was markedly better, lopping 18 feet from the initial 70-mph-to-0 stopping distance, down to a respectable 166. This can likely be explained by the wear of the ILX’s Michelin Pilot HX MXM4 all-season tires, whose blocklike tread pattern can squish when fresh, reducing grip levels and stretching braking distances. After 40,000 miles, this rubber wore and subsequently stiffened, yielding significantly improved performance, further evidenced by an increase of 0.02 g in roadholding grip to 0.83.

As for the powertrain, the 0-to-60-mph sprint improved by 0.2 second, to 6.2 seconds, and the quarter-mile time dropped by 0.1 to 14.9 seconds at a speed of 96 mph—1 mph faster than in our initial testing. Fuel economy rose from 27 mpg during the first portion of the ILX’s stay to 28 mpg by the time 40,000 miles rolled around.

The ILX proved to be largely trouble-free, and its five visits to the dealer were relatively gentle on our wallet. Our first trip at 8710 miles included an oil change and tire rotation—as well as a new set of front door latches per a recall—and set us back $71. We returned roughly 5000 miles later to fix a passenger-side front-door lock that went on strike and to diagnose a vibration at speed. The techs found and fixed (under warranty) a loose door-lock connection and discovered a nail in the right rear tire that was also fixed free of charge; all four wheels were balanced, which cost us $74. At 17,435 miles, a scheduled maintenance visit to change the oil and rotate the tires turned up a slightly bent rim and a bubble in one of the tires. The new rubber rang up at $107. We were back again at 26,826 miles for another oil change and tire rotation and to have the cabin and engine air filters replaced. At that point, we complained that the passenger seat wobbled in its tracks but were told it wasn’t anything out of the ordinary. Our final visit (at 36,197 miles) was for a $151 oil change, vehicle inspection, and tire rotation.

Badge for Your Buck

The ILX let us down again once we focused on the “L” word—that’d be luxury. As we’ve lamented in this car's introduction and update, Acura doesn’t offer navigation with the 2.4-liter with manual-transmission combination—inexcusable for a brand fighting to remain relevant in the luxury segment. “When navigation can be had in a Nissan Versa sedan, navigation should be available in an Acura, regardless of which engine is under the hood,” opined one logbook entry. The five-inch infotainment display that did come with our car looked and behaved as if it were a decade old, too.

Perhaps our biggest issue with the Acura ILX is that its most endearing feature—the drivetrain—can be had in a couple of less-expensive Hondas. The cheaper-and-bigger option is the Honda Accord Sport, which utilizes a similar powertrain, albeit detuned by 12 horsepower, while offering more interior space and improved efficiency for $5915 less. Of course, the other car is the Civic Si sedan, which costs $6590 less than the ILX, and for an extra $1500, Honda will even equip your Si with navigation. At $25,005, that’s a relative bargain compared with our $30,095 ILX.

Neither of those Hondas has leather seating, pushbutton start, or dual-zone climate control, the sort of stuff that’s mandatory in the luxury realm, but as our leather-upholstered chairs suffered visible wear and were cited for a lack of support and overall comfort, one could argue that some of the ILX’s luxury trinkets aren’t necessarily up to snuff.

We applaud Acura for being among the first to join the rapidly growing compact luxury-sedan arena, but as in other segments, the brand’s unexciting styling and product-planning missteps are significant handicaps. For the ILX, they’re even more glaring in the face of the new, premium small cars from Audi, Mercedes, and BMW.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $30,095 (base price: $30,095)

ENGINE TYPE: DOHC 16-valve inline-4, aluminum block and head, port fuel injection

Displacement: 144 cu in, 2354 cc
Power: 201 hp @ 7000 rpm
Torque: 170 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 105.1 in
Length: 179.1 in
Width: 70.6 in Height: 55.6 in
Curb weight: 2970 lb

PERFORMANCE: 40,000 MILES
Zero to 60 mph: 6.2 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.4 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.4 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 8.1 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 8.1 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.9 sec @ 96 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 138 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 166 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.83 g

PERFORMANCE: NEW
Zero to 60 mph: 6.4 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.7 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.9 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 9.0 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 8.9 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.0 sec @ 95 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 138 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 184 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.81 g

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 22/31 mpg
C/D observed: 28 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

WARRANTY:
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
6 years/70,000 miles powertrain;
5 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/50,000 miles roadside assistance


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Months in Fleet: 1 month
Current Mileage: 2162 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 27 mpg
Average Range: 356 miles
Service: $0
Normal Wear: $0
Repair: $0

Just over a decade ago, Acura’s lineup included the NSX and Integra—both among the most rewarding cars in their segments and two fairly iconic pieces of machinery. Since then, Honda’s luxury brand has introduced a line of funky-faced, tweener-sized cars that James Spader talks up in TV ads. Away from the sound booth where Spader records his solicited praise, however, the reality is that Acura’s lineup isn’t quite what it used to be.

But things might be looking up. Acura will soon bring us a new NSX; it currently offers one of the few sporty wagons in our market; and it has delivered a new entry-level sedan, the ILX. We knew the latter wouldn’t be another Integra, but one ILX in particular—the one that shares the Civic Si’s 201-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder and six-speed manual—had us interested enough to order an example for a 40,000-mile test.

A Fairly Large Kitchen Sink, but No Drain

A recap of the ILX line: Box stock, the base model—motivated by a 150-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder tied exclusively to a five-speed automatic—starts at $26,795. A hybrid is available and borrows its engine and electric-motor combo from the Civic hybrid. All ILX models include as standard USB and auxiliary jacks, keyless entry and start, dual-zone climate control, and a power sunroof.

Cars like ours, with the Civic Si powertrain, come one way, combining the above kit with the Premium package, which adds an eight-way power driver’s seat, heated front sport seats, leather upholstery, a seven-speaker audio system with satellite radio, a rearview camera, 17-inch aluminum wheels, fog lamps, and xenon HID headlights. The 2.4 is the only ILX that’s available with a manual, which should explain by itself our choice of long-term trim. Our ILX is therefore both as barebones and as loaded as it can be and stickered at $30,095.

You might notice one item conspicuously absent from our otherwise well-equipped car: a navigation system. Nav is unavailable with the hottest engine, being restricted to the 2.0-liter and hybrid models’ Technology package, which also includes a fancy stereo, a GPS-enabled climate-control function that accounts for the location of the sun (!), and voice controls.

At least time spent lost is spent in comfortable and supportive front seats, and the six-speed manual’s short throws and the 2.4-liter’s enthusiasm to zing through its power band—typical Honda, in other words—have been universally praised. Sprints to 60 mph pass in 6.4 seconds, the quarter-mile is reached in 15.0 seconds at 95 mph, and the ILX tops out at an electronically limited 138 mph.

Hoping Something Grows on Us

We have logged several demerits. The ILX lags behind its powertrain partner, the Si, on the skidpad, achieving 0.81 g compared with the Si’s 0.88, and several of our tribe have bemoaned the soft tires and the squishy suspension on this sportiest of ILXs. The steering is very light and loads and unloads unpredictably as you dial in lock, and quick requests for directional changes can send the rear end into a corkscrewing motion. (These and other dynamic quirks were noted in our test of a different 2.4-liter ILX, too.)

Rear riders have voiced complaints about the roominess of their accommodations. Our plain-jane infotainment setup is like those in most current Acuras and Hondas in that it largely feels outdated, with one logbook scribbler being “amazed at how well the center screen renders album art from an iPod but otherwise suffers from an interface that looks and acts 10 years old.” After a day spent baking in Michigan’s hot summer sun, the cabin starts to smell like someone is storing leftovers under the driver’s seat. Not pleasant.

Finally, a semiaggressive exhaust note is joined by a tiresome buzziness from underhood during top-gear 80-mph cruises, at which point the engine is spinning at 3500 or so rpm. The sound isn’t as refined as it ought to be in this segment; luxury—entry-level, sporty, or otherwise—doesn’t sound like a Civic Si. Perhaps this has caused some short-shifting among our usually redline-happy drivers, as the ILX has returned 27 mpg combined so far, four below the 31-mpg EPA highway rating.

The preeminent question concerning the ILX 2.4 is whether it can successfully blend Civic Si fun with a near-luxury experience. Thus far, we’d say, “Not quite,” but the car has 38,000 miles to change our minds.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $30,095 (base price: $30,095)

ENGINE TYPE: DOHC 16-valve inline-4, aluminum block and head, port fuel injection

Displacement: 144 cu in, 2354 cc
Power: 201 hp @ 7000 rpm
Torque: 170 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 105.1 in
Length: 179.1 in
Width: 70.6 in Height: 55.6 in
Curb weight: 2970 lb

PERFORMANCE: 40,000 MILES
Zero to 60 mph: 6.2 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.4 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.4 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 8.1 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 8.1 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.9 sec @ 96 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 138 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 166 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.83 g

PERFORMANCE: NEW
Zero to 60 mph: 6.4 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.7 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.9 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 9.0 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 8.9 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.0 sec @ 95 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 138 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 184 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.81 g

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 22/31 mpg
C/D observed: 28 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

WARRANTY:
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
6 years/70,000 miles powertrain;
5 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/50,000 miles roadside assistance


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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15111063/2013-acura-ilx-24-premium-long-term-test-wrap-up-review/
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2013 Acura ILX Premium review: 2013 Acura ILX Premium

That was back in 2006. Now, fast forward six years to the launch of the 2013 ILX, a new entry-level Acura model that shares the underpinnings of its contemporary Honda Civic. Like the RSX, the high-performance trim level is basically just a Civic Si without a limited-slip differential. What gives? Is history repeating itself here?

Well, the RSX was designed to be a higher-performance version of the Civic. The ILX, on the other hand, heads in the opposite direction, justifying its higher price tag with more creature comforts, softer seats, and sharper styling. Essentially, it's the more luxurious, more expensive version of the Civic. When one of the Civic's major selling points is its sticker price, I'm not sure that more expensive is the right direction to head and can't help but wonder if we'll see the ILX meet the same fate as the RSX that came before it.

It's just like a Civic...

Let's start beneath the sheet metal. The ILX is available with the same power train as the Honda Civic. Prospective buyers are also given the choice of a 2.0-liter engine and a 1.5-liter Hybrid engine, but our ILX was powered by the 2.4-liter engine from the Civic Si. A typical, high-revving Honda mill, the 2.4-liter's maximum rated at 201-horsepower comes at a lofty 7,000rpm, but the full 170 pound-feet of available torque comes on at a more reasonable 4,400rpm. The optional six-speed manual gearbox is the same and features the same effortless, snappy throw as the Si. Fuel economy is rated at 22 mpg in the city, 31 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined.

The ILX's 105.1 wheelbase is identical to the Civic's, and the rest of its exterior dimensions are within millimeters of the Honda's (the variation coming primarily in from the differences in the sheet metal). The Acura sits on the same MacPherson strut front suspension and multilink independent rear suspension. Spec the 2.4-liter engine and the ILX 17-inch wheels are of a different design from the Civic Si's, but the P215/45-R17 all-season tires wrapped around those wheels are the same.

The throttle is the same drive-by-wire system, and the front wheels are steered by the same electronic power-steering system, but the steering ratio has been quickened to 15.11:1 versus 16.08:1. The ILX's steering is a precise point and shoot affair -- a rarity in front-wheel-drive cars these days -- but it lacks feel, feedback, and weightiness. Interestingly, the ILX's turning radius is about 8.4 inches wider than the Civic Si's. Despite its cushier cabin, the ILX only gains 83 pounds of curb weight over its H-badged cousin.

...but it doesn't look like a Civic...

Like the Acura RSX that came before it, the ILX is, of course, a bit more than just a rebadged Civic. There are a number of differences between the two models.

The primary difference is an aesthetic one. The ILX is wrapped in sheet metal that's slightly more curvaceous than its wedge-shaped cousin; its rump is rounded ever-so-slightly and its shoulders emphasized with a dramatic crease that rises over the rear wheel well and plunges to join the high beltline that runs the length of the vehicle. The side windows have been reshaped into something a bit more BMW-esque, and the overall vehicle length increased slightly with body work.

The upgraded lighting is a welcome addition to the ILX's spec sheet, casting crisp HID illumination on the road ahead without blinding oncoming drivers. The lights feature automatic illumination, but don't feature any sort of lateral steering or automatic high-beam technology. I found the shape of the lights at both ends of the vehicle to be very handsome. The fronts complement the Acura corporate beak fantastically, and the rear tie together what could easily be a badonkadonk rear end.

From certain angles, the ILX looks downright classy, an improvement over the space cadet looks of the Civic. However, from other angles, the Acura seems a bit goofy. Most notably, the lower intakes of the angular, boat prow front bumper add an odd bulbous look to what is otherwise a sharply designed face. Overall, the ILX's design is decidedly "meh." It's generally inoffensive, but the styling takes so few chances that the result is rather anonymous.

As I already stated, beneath the sheet metal, most Acura ILX models are identical to their Honda Civic analogs. However, our 2.4-liter model differs from the Civic Si in two critical ways. For starters, it lacks a helical limited-slip differential (LSD) and the option for stickier summer tires isn't available -- both indicators that the ILX 2.4's primary goal isn't outright performance. A revival of the Acura RSX Type-S this is not, but I doubt most ILX drivers will even notice the omission.

...and it's more luxurious than a Civic...

Inside the cabin, the ILX receives a number of substantial "upgrades" over the Honda Civic as well. I put "upgrades" in quotes because whether many of these changes should be considered improvements is a bit subjective.

For starters, there's the plushier leather upholstery that wraps the new eight-way power adjustable driver's seat that comes as part of the Premium package. There's the new curvaceous, soft-touch dashboard that rises before you. Keyless entry and push-button start are my favorite new features. The Civic's bi-level digital gauges have been replaced with a more traditional dual analog, speedometer and tachometer gauge setup. Automatic climate controls do most of the HVAC fiddling for you and heated seating surfaces on the front buckets keep your rear end toasty in the wintertime.

However, that tall dashboard means that I had to raise the seat a bit more than I was comfortable with to see out over the extremely tall hood at the center of the dashboard, which cuts into available headroom. The soft-touch, Godzllla-skin material that covers much of the dashboard just feels cheap and rubbery. Those more cushy leather seats don't offer very much lateral support during cornering. The ILX's cabin does look better than a Civic's on paper and in photos, but ergonomically, I think I prefer the cheaper model.

And then there's the cabin tech. Models, like our tester, that don't come equipped with navigation utilize the same 5-inch i-MID system that is found on the Honda Civic. The only difference is that now it's commanded with a large knob and button system found in the center of the dashboard, rather than with steering-wheel controls as is on the Civic. This makes it harder to work with while driving, since you have to take a hand off of the wheel.

In this configuration, the ILX features Bluetooth hands-free calling with address book sync, but the voice command system that controls the hands-free system doesn't feature automatic voice tagging or speech-to-text recognition. So, after syncing your address book, you'll have to go in and manually choose favorites to manually add voice tags for -- a tedious process that I'd rather just skip. Of course, the full address book can be browsed manually as well, but that requires using the big control knob and taking a hand off of the wheel and eyes, momentarily, off of the road.

The system also features standard Bluetooth audio streaming, USB connectivity for mass storage devices and iPods/iPhones, an auxiliary audio input, and the ability to interface with the Pandora Internet Radio app on a connected iPhone. SiriusXM Satellite Radio, AM/FM radio, and a single-slot CD player round out the audio sources that feed the Premium model's seven-speaker, 200-watt audio system (including an 8-inch subwoofer).

There is a step-up Technology package available that replaces the 5-inch interface with an 8-inch AcuraLink navigation system with traffic, weather, and Zagat reviews. This package also upgrades the audio system to a 410-watt, 10-speaker ELS surround sound system with a more robust voice command system that lets passengers select from songs on a connected iPhone with the sound of their voice. This is probably the trim level to get because the Premium configuration already looks pretty dated compared to even the Hyundai Veloster. However, Acura doesn't offer the technology package in conjunction with the 2.4-liter engine, so you'll have to step down to the 2.0-liter model or up to the Hybrid to even have a shot at this.

...but, is it worth the premium price?

The short answer is "probably not."

The ILX starts at $25,900 for the 2.0-liter base model with the standard five-speed automatic transmission. However, for $5,245 more than a Civic EX, you only get a 10-horsepower bump, less fuel economy, and an Acura badge. Even Honda's own vehicle comparison tool shows the 2013 Civic as the clear winner in this comparison.

As tested, our 2013 ILX 2.4 Premium's sticker price jumps up to $30,095 (including an $895 destination charge), a whopping $6,750 more than a fully loaded Civic Si sedan with navigation with which it shares its bones. For the extra dough, you get the leather trim with heated front seats, power adjustment on driver's seat, a slightly nicer stereo system, a rearview camera, HID headlamps, and, of course, an Acura badge. That may not sound like that bad of a deal until you realize that you're also losing the Si's navigation system, summer performance tires, and limited-slip differential. Whether you're comparing performance, cabin technology, or bang for the buck, at this trim level the Civic Si simply wins again.

One could make an argument for the fully loaded, teched-out ILX Hybrid with Technology package with its AcuraLink navigation and ELS premium audio rig, but its $35,295 price tag ventures far too deeply into BMW territory for what is ostensibly still just a Honda Civic.

Tech specs
Model2013 Acura ILX
Trim2.4-liter, Premium
Power train2.4-liter, FWD, six-speed manual
EPA fuel economy 22 mpg city, 31 mpg highway, 25 mpg combined mpg
Observed fuel economyn/a
NavigationAvailable AcuraLink with traffic, weather, and Zagat POIs
Bluetooth phone supportYes, standard
Disc playerSingle-slot CD
MP3 player supportStandard analog 3.5mm auxiliary input, USB connection, Bluetooth audio streaming, iPod connection
Other digital audioOptional SiriusXM Satellite Radio
Audio systemSeven-speaker Premium audio system with 8-inch subwoofer
Driver aidsRearview camera
Base price$25,900
Price as tested$30,095
Sours: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/reviews/2013-acura-ilx-review/
Used White 2013 Acura ILX Premium Pkg Walk Around Review - Stony Plain, Alberta

2013 Acura ILX

Acura has had a hard time building and maintaining a brand identity over the past decade. Itself unsure of whether it should strive for "Tier 1" luxury status or position itself as a near-luxury, high-tech brand for up-and-coming professionals and hip retirees, its product has reflected this lack of direction. The 2013 ILX continues this confusion, especially in light of the coming reborn NSX, but it's worth evaluating the smallest Acura sedan on its own merits.

Based not-so-loosely on the latest generation of the Honda Civic, the ILX nonetheless has its own face: a more toned-down, widely-palatable version of the chromed plastic grille Acura introduced a few years ago. The fenders swell gently from the sides, there are character lines to accent its shape, and the greenhouse arches gracefully ove the passenger compartment. On the whole it's a handsome, if not lust-inducing, sedan. Inside, it looks like a typical Acura: edgy curves, contoured surfaces, and easy-to-read gauges. It's a pleasant place to travel.

There are three versions of the ILX available, named for their drivetrains: the 2.0L, the 2.4L, and the Hybrid. The 2.0L offers a four-cylinder, 2.0-liter engine rated at 150 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque. A five-speed automatic with paddle shifters is standard. It scores an EPA-estimated gas mileage rating of 24 mpg city and 35 mpg highway.

Review continues below

The 2.4L is the sporty model, with what is essentially the Civic Si's 201-horsepower, 170-pound-foot 2.4-liter four-cylinder mated to a six-speed manual transmission--no automatic is offered with this model. It's the fun-to-drive version, but you'll have to sacrifice more creature comforts than the automatic transmission to get it, but more on that later. It's rated at 22 mpg city and 31 mpg highway.

Finally, the ILX Hybrid gets its go from a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine paired with an integrated hybrid drive system and continuously variable transmission (CVT). Total combined power is rated at 111 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque. The EPA estimates gas mileage at 39 mpg city  and 38 mpg highway.

All three share the same basic lightweight chassis, which means all three feel nimble enough in the corners, and brake very well. The suspension tuning on the 2.4L the same as the other two models, and falls short of true sport-sedan feel. The 2.0L and Hybrid models put comfort above outright pace, and succeed in delivering smooth, even ride quality. While the 2.4L is the sportiest model, the 2.0L is also fun-to-drive, with enough pep for most people and somewhat better gas mileage. The Hybrid, on the other hand, feels very slow in many situations--too slow even for fast-flowing suburban traffic at times.

Inside, the cabin is comfortable and spacious--surprisingly so in the rear seats, with enough room even for taller adults to fit comfortably. Ergonomically, things are laid out very well, with all controls easy to identify and use without taking one's eyes from the road. Fit and finish is also very good, with solid-feeling construction and quality materials (plastic, rubber, and leather) in all touch-points. Cabin noise is low, though not quite mausoleum-quiet like you'll find in some luxury cars a bit farther up the ladder, including Acura's own.

There's also a fairly roomy trunk, ample in-cabin storage in cubbies and door pockets, with well-placed cup holders. Cargo volume is a solid 12.4 cubic feet (10.0 cubic feet for the Hybrid, which places the battery pack behind the rear seats). Visibility is very good thanks to the large windows and well-placed seating position.

Features and options for the 2013 Acura ILX are grouped neatly into packages: Premium and Technology. The Premium Package includes leather seating surfaces; eight-way power adjustable driver seat; two-way heated front seats; a premium sound system with Bluetooth, USB, and Pandora functionality; an auto-dimming rearview mirror; a multi-view rear camera; and on non-Hybrid models, an active sound cancellation system that further damps noise within the cabin. The Technology Package includes: navigation with voice recognition, a rear-view camera, real-time traffic/weather, and AcuraLink satellite communications system; plus a premium sound system with Bluetooth, USB, and Pandora among its capabilities. The Premium Package is available on all ILX models, while the Technology Package is available only on 2.0L and Hybrid models.

Standard equipment on all 2013 ILX models includes a leather-wrapped steering wheel; cloth-trimmed front seats (2.0L base and Hybrid); dual-zone automatic climate control; Bluetooth hands-free phone interface; power moonroof; keyless entry with push-button start; rear-view camera; and a 12-volt power outlet. Available accessories include larger 17-inch alloy wheels, aerodynamic bodywork, fog lights, a remote engine start, and an engine block heater.

Sours: https://www.thecarconnection.com/overview/acura_ilx_2013

Ilx 2013 package acura premium

Good evening, Lydia Pavlovna. Isn't it fabulously beautiful today. " Cover the window, you dreamer.

2013 Acura ILX Premium Package Interior - John Eagle Acura

The man also got to his feet and immediately sucked on my wife's milkings, she tried to playfully move away, and then deliberately. Began to sway a little, substituting her breasts for kisses in turn. Having amused himself with her tits, the man lightly slapped my wife on the ass and reached for his things.

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