Chills nausea dizziness no fever

Chills nausea dizziness no fever DEFAULT

Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment

The majority of people infected with yellow fever virus will either not have symptoms, or have mild symptoms and completely recover.

For people who develop symptoms, the time from infection until illness is typically 3 to 6 days.

Because there is a risk of severe disease, all people who develop symptoms of yellow fever after traveling to or living in an area at risk for the virus should see their healthcare provider. Once you have been infected, you are likely to be protected from future infections.

Symptoms

  • Most people will not have symptoms.
  • Some people will develop yellow fever illness with initial symptoms including:
    • Sudden onset of fever
    • Chills
    • Severe headache
    • Back pain
    • General body aches
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Fatigue (feeling tired)
    • Weakness
    • Most people with the initial symptoms improve within one week.
    • For some people who recover, weakness and fatigue (feeling tired) might last several months.
  • A few people will develop a more severe form of the disease.
    • For 1 out of 7 people who have the initial symptoms, there will be a brief remission (a time you feel better) that may last only a few hours or for a day, followed by a more severe form of the disease.
  • Severe symptoms include:
    • High fever
    • Yellow skin (jaundice)
    • Bleeding
    • Shock
    • Organ failure
  • Severe yellow fever disease can be deadly. If you develop any of these symptoms, see a healthcare provider immediately.
  • Among those who develop severe disease, % die.

Diagnosis

  • Yellow fever infection is diagnosed based on laboratory testing, a person’s symptoms, and travel history.
  • More information on diagnostic testing is available on the For Healthcare Providers page.

Treatment

  • There is no medicine to treat or cure infection from yellow fever.
  • Rest, drink fluids, and use pain relievers and medication to reduce fever and relieve aching.
  • Avoid certain medications, such as aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for example ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve), which may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • People with severe symptoms of yellow fever infection should be hospitalized for close observation and supportive care.
  • If after returning from travel you have symptoms of yellow fever (usually about a week after being bitten by an infected mosquito), protect yourself from mosquito bites for up to 5 days after symptoms begin. This will help prevent spreading yellow fever to uninfected mosquitoes that can spread the virus to other people.
Sours: https://www.cdc.gov/yellowfever/symptoms/index.html

Symptoms of COVID

If you have any symptoms of COVID (coronavirus), self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a COVID test.

The most common symptoms of COVID are:

Less common symptoms of COVID include:

  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this could mean they're completely gone or just different to normal
  • nasal congestion (runny or blocked nose)
  • conjunctivitis (also known as red eyes)
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • muscle or joint pain (aches and pains)
  • different types of skin rash
  • nausea or vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • chills or dizziness

Symptoms of severe COVID‐19 disease include:

You may not have all of these symptoms or your symptoms may be mild. Symptoms may vary for different age groups or variants of the virus.

It can take up to 14 days after you are infected for symptoms to show. You can spread COVID during this time.

Symptoms of COVID can be similar to symptoms of cold, flu or hay fever.

If you are in doubt about any symptoms you have, phone your GP.

Sours: https://www2.hse.ie/conditions/covid19/symptoms/overview/
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Is dizziness your main problem?

How old are you?

3 years or younger

3 years or younger

4 to 11 years

4 to 11 years

12 years or older

12 years or older

Are you male or female?

  • If you are transgender or non-binary, choose the sex that matches the body parts (such as ovaries, testes, prostate, breasts, penis, or vagina) you now have in the area where you are having symptoms.
  • If your symptoms aren’t related to those organs, you can choose the gender you identify with.
  • If you have some organs of both sexes, you may need to go through this triage tool twice (once as "male" and once as "female"). This will make sure that the tool asks the right questions for you.

Have you had a head injury?

Did you pass out completely (lose consciousness)?

If you are answering for someone else: Is the person unconscious now?

(If you are answering this question for yourself, say no.)

Are you back to your normal level of alertness?

After passing out, it's normal to feel a little confused, weak, or light-headed when you first wake up or come to. But unless something else is wrong, these symptoms should pass pretty quickly and you should soon feel about as awake and alert as you normally do.

Yes

Has returned to normal after loss of consciousness

No

Has returned to normal after loss of consciousness

Did the loss of consciousness occur during the past 24 hours?

Yes

Loss of consciousness in past 24 hours

No

Loss of consciousness in past 24 hours

Have you had any new neurological symptoms other than dizziness?

Yes

Other neurological symptoms

No

Other neurological symptoms

Do you have these symptoms right now?

Yes

Neurological symptoms now present

No

Neurological symptoms now present

Is the dizziness severe?

Severe means that you are so dizzy that you need help to stand or walk.

Do you have vertigo?

Have you had sudden, severe hearing loss?

Yes

Sudden, severe hearing loss

No

Sudden, severe hearing loss

Is vertigo a new problem?

Are your symptoms getting worse?

Yes

Dizziness is getting worse

No

Dizziness is getting worse

Did the symptoms start after a recent injury?

Yes

Symptoms began after recent injury

No

Symptoms began after recent injury

Have you recently had moments when you felt like you were going to faint?

Yes

Episodes of feeling faint

No

Episodes of feeling faint

Have you felt faint or light-headed for more than 24 hours?

Yes

Has felt faint or light-headed for more than 24 hours

No

Has felt faint or light-headed for more than 24 hours

Are you nauseated or vomiting?

Nauseated means you feel sick to your stomach, like you are going to vomit.

Are you nauseated a lot of the time or vomiting repeatedly?

Yes

Persistent nausea or vomiting

No

Persistent nausea or vomiting

Do you think that a medicine could be causing the dizziness?

Think about whether the dizziness started after you began using a new medicine or a higher dose of a medicine.

Yes

Medicine may be causing dizziness

No

Medicine may be causing dizziness

Have you been feeling dizzy for more than 5 days?

Yes

Dizziness for more than 5 days

No

Dizziness for more than 5 days

Is the problem disrupting your daily activities?

Yes

Dizziness interfering with daily activities

No

Dizziness interfering with daily activities

Many things can affect how your body responds to a symptom and what kind of care you may need. These include:

  • Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker.
  • Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.
  • Medicines you take. Certain medicines, such as blood thinners (anticoagulants), medicines that suppress the immune system like steroids or chemotherapy, or natural health products can cause symptoms or make them worse.
  • Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. These kinds of events can cause symptoms afterwards or make them more serious.
  • Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel.

Try Home Treatment

You have answered all the questions. Based on your answers, you may be able to take care of this problem at home.

  • Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms.
  • Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner.

Vertigo is the feeling that you or your surroundings are moving when there is no actual movement. It may feel like spinning, whirling, or tilting. Vertigo may make you sick to your stomach, and you may have trouble standing, walking, or keeping your balance.

Symptoms of a heart attack may include:

  • Chest pain or pressure, or a strange feeling in the chest.
  • Sweating.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Pain, pressure, or a strange feeling in the back, neck, jaw, or upper belly, or in one or both shoulders or arms.
  • Light-headedness or sudden weakness.
  • A fast or irregular heartbeat.

For men and women, the most common symptom is chest pain or pressure. But women are somewhat more likely than men to have other symptoms, like shortness of breath, nausea, and back or jaw pain.

Symptoms of serious illness may include:

  • A severe headache.
  • A stiff neck.
  • Mental changes, such as feeling confused or much less alert.
  • Extreme fatigue (to the point where it's hard for you to function).
  • Shaking chills.

Heartbeat changes can include:

    • A faster or slower heartbeat than is normal for you. This would include a pulse rate of more than beats per minute (when you are not exercising) or less than 60 beats per minute (unless that is normal for you).
    • A heart rate that does not have a steady pattern.
    • Skipped beats.
    • Extra beats.

Neurological symptoms—which may be signs of a problem with the nervous system—can affect many body functions. Symptoms may include:

  • Numbness, weakness, or lack of movement in your face, arm, or leg, especially on only one side of your body.
  • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Trouble speaking.
  • Confusion or trouble understanding simple statements.
  • Problems with balance or coordination (for example, falling down or dropping things).
  • Seizures.

Many prescription and non-prescription medicines can make you feel light-headed or affect your balance. A few examples are:

  • Antibiotics.
  • Blood pressure medicines.
  • Medicines used to treat depression or anxiety.
  • Pain medicines.
  • Medicines used to treat cancer (chemotherapy).

Shock is a life-threatening condition that may quickly occur after a sudden illness or injury.

Adults and older children often have several symptoms of shock. These include:

  • Passing out (losing consciousness).
  • Feeling very dizzy or light-headed, like you may pass out.
  • Feeling very weak or having trouble standing.
  • Not feeling alert or able to think clearly. You may be confused, restless, fearful, or unable to respond to questions.

Seek Care Now

Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

  • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care in the next hour.
  • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
    • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
    • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Call Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call or other emergency services now.

After you call , the operator may tell you to chew 1 adult-strength ( mg) or 2 to 4 low-dose (81 mg) aspirin. Wait for an ambulance. Do not try to drive yourself.

Sometimes people don't want to call They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call for medical transport to the hospital.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your doctor in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner.

Call Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call or other emergency services now.

Sometimes people don't want to call They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call for medical transport to the hospital.

Head Injury, Age 4 and Older

Head Injury, Age 3 and Younger

Sours: https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/dizzi
Chills without Fever - Causes, Treatment

Vertigo (Unknown Cause)

Image showing a cross-section of the external, middle, and inner ear, including the ear canal, eardrum, and eustachian tube.

Vertigo is a false feeling of motion. You aren't moving, but it feels as if you are. This feeling can be caused by problems in the inner ear. In addition to helping with hearing, the inner ear is part of the balance center of your body. When something affects the balance center, you can have vertigo. Often it feels as if you or the room are spinning. A vertigo attack may cause sudden nausea, vomiting, and heavy sweating. Severe vertigo causes a loss of balance and can make you fall. During vertigo, small head movements and changes in body position will often make the symptoms worse. You may also have ringing in the ears (tinnitus).

An episode of vertigo may last seconds, minutes, or hours. Once you are over the first episode, it may never come back. But symptoms may return off and on. Often your provider will have you do certain head and body movements in the office to treat your vertigo.

The cause of your vertigo is not yet known. Possible causes of vertigo include:

  • Inner ear inflammation

  • Disease of the nerves to the inner ear

  • Movement of calcium particles in the inner ear

  • Poor blood flow to the balance centers of the brain

  • Migraine headaches

  • In older adults, the use of more than one medicine along with some health conditions

Home care

  • If symptoms are severe, rest quietly in bed. Change positions very slowly. There is often one position that will feel best. This may be lying on one side or lying on your back with your head slightly raised on pillows. Until you have no symptoms, you are at a higher risk of falling. Let someone help you when you get up. Get rid of home hazards such as loose electrical cords and throw rugs. Don’t walk in unfamiliar areas that are not lighted. Use night-lights in bathrooms and kitchens.

  • Don't drive a car or work with dangerous machinery until symptoms have been gone for at least 1 week.

  • Take medicine as prescribed to ease your symptoms. Unless another medicine was prescribed for symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and dizziness, you may use over-the-counter motion sickness pills. If you have any questions about an over-the-counter medicine or its side effects, talk with your healthcare provider or pharmacist before taking it.

Follow-up care

Follow up with your healthcare provider or as directed. If you are referred to a specialist or for testing, make the appointment right away.

When to get medical advice

Call your healthcare provider if you have any of the following:

  • Fever of °F (38ºC) or higher, or as directed by your healthcare provider

  • Vertigo gets worse or is not controlled by prescribed medicine 

  • Repeated vomiting that doesn't stop after taking prescribed medicine 

  • Severe headache

  • Confusion

  • Weakness of an arm, leg, or one side of the face

  • Trouble with speech or vision

Call

Call if any of these occur:

  • Feeling faint (loss of consciousness)

  • Seizure

Sours: https://www.fairview.org/patient-education/EN

Dizziness no nausea fever chills

Body Chills: What’s Causing Them?

4. COVID

Symptoms

  • Fever
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • Cough or congestion, which may produce mucus
  • Runny nose
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
  • Body aches
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Low oxygen levels on a pulse oximeter (oxygen measuring device)

COVID is a highly contagious virus caused by a coronavirus, specifically the SARS-CoV This virus infects the respiratory tract (including your nose, throat, sinuses, and lungs). Although it is a respiratory infection, it can also affect other organs including the brain, blood vessels, and the skin.

Symptoms are very similar to those seen in the flu and the common cold. Sometimes, cases of COVID that begin with mild symptoms worsen and become life-threatening. COVID is very contagious, even when people don’t have symptoms.

Rest and hydration can be important in treating symptoms and feeling better for people with mild cases of COVID If you suspect COVID, monitor your symptoms and speak with your doctor about your condition.

They will give you additional at-home treatment plans. These may include over-the-counter medication, oxygen-monitoring devices, or prescription medication, like an inhaler. They can also advise you when to go to the hospital if your symptoms get worse.

Sours: https://www.buoyhealth.com/learn/chills
12 Causes of Dizziness

What can cause a headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain?

Many illnesses can cause a headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, and stomach pain. It is difficult to narrow down the specific condition a person may have, based on symptoms alone. A person should always seek medical care if they are concerned. The symptoms may disappear on their own after a mild illness, but they could be signs of something more serious, such as a head injury or stroke.

The symptoms may also be interlinked. For example, a person may experience a headache and dizziness as symptoms of changes in their head. They may experience stomach pain as a result of nausea. Fatigue may result if a person is tired due to pain.

This article will explain some possible causes of headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain, including gastroenteritis, migraine, and COVID It will also advise when a person should contact a doctor or healthcare professional for each possible cause.

There are many possible causes for these symptoms, including those below. If someone experiences the symptoms, it is essential to contact their doctor and avoid self-diagnosing. This way, they can obtain the most accurate diagnosis and receive appropriate treatment.

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis results from inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Different conditions can cause gastroenteritis, including viruses such as norovirus and bacterial infections such as Salmonella. refer to viral gastroenteritis as stomach flu.

Symptoms

A person with gastroenteritis may :

Headaches can be a symptom of dehydration resulting from the gastroenteritis infection itself. They may also occur due to muscle stiffness from vomiting or having to stay in bed for long periods.

Dizziness may occur because of lost fluids from diarrhea or vomiting.

Learn what a person with stomach flu should eat here.

When to contact a doctor

Most cases of gastroenteritis are viral and go away on their own.

However, if a person shows signs of dehydration or the illness becomes severe, they should contact a doctor or healthcare professional. Symptoms of dehydration or severe gastroenteritis may :

Treatment of gastroenteritis may involve antibiotics, especially if a person is a young child, an older adult, or pregnant.

Learn more about signs of dehydration here.

Pregnancy

Sometimes people experience headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain during pregnancy. Some people may experience these symptoms early on in pregnancy as pregnancy hormone levels rise. However, symptoms can occur at any time during pregnancy.

Symptoms

A confirms that a person who is pregnant may experience:

When to contact a doctor

These symptoms are usually normal during pregnancy. However, it is important to tell a doctor about all symptoms and to ask about treatment options for those that disrupt daily life.

If a person experiences severe dizziness, a headache so intense it is unbearable, or they cannot keep any food down, they should seek care right away.

Some people find relief from pregnancy symptoms by avoiding certain foods, drinking more water, or resting.

Learn more about what to expect during pregnancy here.

Migraine 

Migraine is a chronic condition. Most people who have migraine experience it often during their life.

Symptoms

A migraine headache is a type of neurological headache that :

  • intense head pain
  • nausea
  • changes in mood
  • dizziness

Some people also experience unusual sensations, such as strange lights or sounds.

When to contact a doctor

Migraine is not dangerous. However, if a person experiences the following symptoms alongside a migraine headache, they should contact their doctor:

Identifying migraine triggers can help a person avoid headaches. A doctor can also prescribe a wide range of medications, including medicines that can either prevent or treat migraines.

Read more on when to worry about a headache here.

Cold and flu 

The cold and the flu are both respiratory illnesses, but they differ based on which virus has caused them. The flu could more serious health complications, such as pneumonia.

Symptoms

People with the cold or influenza virus may develop the :

Symptoms of the flu tend to be more severe, last longer, and may come on suddenly.

When to contact a doctor

Both the cold and flu are viruses that go away on their own.

However, a person should contact a doctor if they experience:

  • difficulty breathing
  • ongoing chest or stomach pain or pressure
  • ongoing dizziness or confusion
  • seizures
  • severe muscle pain
  • extreme weakness
  • fever or cough that goes away and comes back or worsens

A doctor can also prescribe a drug to make the flu less severe if a person seeks treatment early. A person should drink plenty of fluids, rest, and stay home to avoid spreading the virus.

Learn how to treat a cold or flu at home here.

Concussion

People with concussion may have recently had a blow to the head, such as from a fall or car wreck.

Symptoms

A head injury a headache, as well as neurological symptoms such as:

Learn about the symptoms of concussion here.

When to contact a doctor

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. However, it can require a doctor to hospitalize and observe the person.

Depending on the nature of the head injury, a person might need ongoing support or rehabilitation such as occupational therapy.

Stroke 

A stroke blood flow to the brain becomes blocked, usually because of a blood clot.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person and may change based on which area of the brain a stroke affects. Some people experience nausea, dizziness, or vomiting.

The symptoms of a stroke include:

  • not being able to raise both arms to the same level
  • one side of the face drooping, especially when a person smiles
  • severe headache
  • changes in speech, especially not being able to repeat words

When to contact a doctor

A person should go to the emergency room or call immediately if they notice these symptoms in themselves or someone else. Delaying care can result in death.

There is no safe home treatment for a stroke. A doctor may perform surgery, admit a person to the hospital, or recommend long-term care, such as physical or speech therapy.

Other neurological conditions

Because the brain controls much of what the body does, neurological conditions symptoms such as nausea and dizziness, as well as a headache. Although rare, the appearance of these symptoms together may signal another neurological condition, such as a brain tumor.

Only a doctor can properly diagnose a neurological condition, so it is important to see a neurologist for any unexplained symptoms that do not go away with home treatment. The treatment for these symptoms will vary depending on the underlying cause.

Learn about different types of headache here.

Summary 

Headaches can be scary, and nausea can make even basic daily functions difficult.

If a person experiences these symptoms alongside dizziness, stomach pain, and fatigue, they may feel concerned. However, in many cases, symptoms go away on their own or happen because of a minor illness, not because of a major health crisis.

There are many possible causes of these symptoms, in addition to the conditions above. A person should discuss their symptoms and history with a doctor to obtain a proper diagnosis.

It is important to contact a doctor as soon as possible if these symptoms do not clear up on their own or worsen, or if there are additional symptoms.

Sours: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/headache-nausea-dizziness-fatigue-abdominal-pain

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