Palo alto tac recommended version

Palo alto tac recommended version DEFAULT

recommended_PAN-OS_LIVEcommunity.jpeg

 

Hello there, 

 

As a former Technical Support Engineer, one question I was often asked was "What version of PAN-OS do you recommend?"  Unsurprisingly, this question also comes up on a regular basis as a LIVEcommunity discussion.

 

Luckily, the answer is easy to find—Palo Alto Networks' support engineers have a Support PAN-OS Software Release Guidance article located in .

 

 

 

Recommended versions article detailing out the current recommended versionsRecommended versions article detailing out the current recommended versions

 

 

The  article is constantly updated with every new revision. It lists out all of the currently supported versions of PAN-OS, Release Dates, and what version is Support Preferred. 

 

The article covers the following products:

 

  • PAN-OS for Firewalls
  • Panorama on VM / M-series
  • GlobalProtect
  • User-ID / Terminal Server Agent

 

That article is reviewed on a weekly basis to ensure that it remains up-to-date with the latest information on the recommended version of the latest software.

 

In the article, you'll also find links to the latest , as well as recommended versions for 

 

I hope that this helps someone find the information that they need!

 

Thanks for taking time to read my blog.
If you enjoyed this, please hit the button, don't forget to to the LIVEcommunityBlog area.

 

As always, we welcome all comments and feedback in the comments section below.

 

Stay Secure,
Joe Delio
End of line

Sours: https://live.paloaltonetworks.com/t5/blogs/discussion-feature-recommended-pan-os-versions/ba-p/

PAN-OS upgrade Best Practice Document:

It is best practice to always download and install the latest maintenance release for each feature release and then reboot before you install the base image for the next feature release, which applies to each feature release through which you pass in the upgrade path.

In this example, we are upgrading from PAN-OS to

Test firewall is configured in Active/Passive HA cluster managed by Panorama.
Best practice document:

Verify  all steps before the upgrade.
Dependencies:

A. Before you upgrade, make sure the firewall is running a version of app + threat (content version) that meets the minimum requirement of the new PAN-OS (see release notes).

B. Recommendation is  always run the latest version of content to ensure the most accurate and effective protections are being applied.

C. Panorama should be running the same or a later version of a feature release than the firewall (more than two feature versions is supported but not recommended as of June ).
D. Panorama should also be running the same or later version of a maintenance release than the firewall (up to two maintenance versions is supported.

E. Panorama may manage a firewall that is running on a later maintenance release than it&#;s own, but more than 2 versions is not recommended (ie. Panorama can manage firewalls up to )

If the firewall is runningPanorama versions supported are
PAN-OS x x, x, x, x
PAN-OS xx, x, x
PAN-OS xx, x
PAN-OS xx

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Determine the need to upgrade
  2. Pre-upgrade checklist
  3. Panorama upgrade procedure
  4. Firewall upgrade procedure (HA)
  5. Post-upgrade checklist
  6. Troubleshooting resources
  7. Downgrade procedure

 

 

1) Determine the Need to Upgrade:

  1. Upgrade should be considered for only the following reasons:

    A. New features that are not available in current version
    B. Patches for security vulnerabilities in PAN-OS (see Security Advisories page)
    C. Bug fixes that are not available in current version
    D. Current version is going to End of Life soon (see PAN-OS EOL policy)

    For a generic PAN-OS Software release guidance refer: Preferred PAN-OS release
    Consult with Palo Alto Networks account team for upgrade decision, so that vendor
    account team can provide you with a more tailored release guidance and a recommended PAN-OS version, specifically for your environments .

    For the purpose of this document, we will be upgrading from x to x to demonstrate the upgrading process across two major releases ( > > ).

    NOTE:For any PAN-OS version prior to PAN-OS (PAN-OS and lower), it is recommended to go to the latest maintenance release to prevent running into issues during the upgrade.

    HA Upgrade NOTE:When upgrading across two major release versions at a time, you will likely experience a network outage. However, if the devices are upgraded one major version at a time, HA will remain active and continue to synchronize sessions and no network outage will be seen.

    To maintain HA sync and activity,upgrade the HA pair in tandem one major release at a time.
    A. If you upgrade one device by two major upgrades, the newly upgraded device will stay in suspended mode with the error peer OS too old.
    B. Upgrading one device by two major upgrades, would lead to loss HA functionality and may result in undesirable network impact.

    2) Pre-Upgrade Checklist:

    A. Review release notes.
    B. Do not schedule Panorama and firewall upgrades at the same time.
    C. Upgrade Panorama first, wait at least 24 hours and then upgrade the firewall.
    D. Upgrade should be carried out during non-business hours or a scheduled maintenance window to minimize impact.
    E. Allocate sufficient time in the change window for upgrade, troubleshooting and possible downgrade procedures. It may take up to hours to upgrade a slower or older system, depending on config. Multiply if upgrading across multiple versions.
    F. Identify business contacts who will help verify application and network functionalities after the upgrade.

    Back up configuration and device state before upgrade.

    View of PAN-OS Device setup screen in Configuration Management

  2. Device > Setup > Operations > Save Named Configuration Snapshot
  3. Device > Setup > Operations > Export Named Configuration Snapshot
  4. Device > Setup > Operations > Export Device State
  5. Device > Support > Generate Tech Support File

View of PAN-OS Device support screen in Tech Support File

Document any non-standard settings that should be applied post-upgrade:
Disable TCP state checking
Non-syn TCP reject
Any debug setting if existing (not recommended)

Depending on the target PAN-OS release you want to, determine the upgrade path. Refer here

Stage/Download necessary PAN-OS images ahead of time. You will need both the base image and the latest maintenance release.
The base image should be installed but need not rebooted.

In this example, we need to download the following versions:

– The latest preferred x maintenance release. (it is recommended to bring your current Feature release to the latest recommended maintenance release before proceeding)
– for firewalls, for Panorama (base image) NOTE: the base image and maintenance versions will not become visible in the download section until you have a version of installed.
– The latest preferred x maintenance release.
– (base image)
– The latest preferred x maintenance release.

Following the PAN-OS upgrade, you may need to upgrade associated software (such as GlobalProtect agent or User-ID agent).

– See the Associated Software Versions chart in the release notes.

Console connectivity:

Arrange for Out-of-Band access (Console access) to the firewall if possible. This is to help recover from any unexpected situations where we lose connectivity to the firewall after upgrade.

3) Panorama Upgrade Procedure:

A. Make sure no policy or configuration changes are being made by acquiring a config lock.
View of PAN-OS GUI PadLock

B. Click the padlock on the upper-righthand corner of GUI
C. If there are any locks, remove the locks and talk with the admin who placed the lock there and remove or commit.
D. Clear or complete any pending commit job making a commit to panorama before starting the upgrade.

Recommended: Post-upgrade fail over testing:

Suspend Secondary Panorama to fail connection back to Primary Panorama to make sure failover still works after upgrade.

– CLI: > request high-availability state suspend
– GUI: Device > High Availability > Operations > click Suspend Local Device
– Verify suspend status on Secondary Panorama
– Verify all firewalls are connected to Primary Panorama
– Re-enable Secondary Panorama and High Availability function
– – CLI: > request high-availability state functional
– – GUI: Device > High Availability > Operations > click Make Local Device Functional

Primary Panorama Upgrade procedure:

– Disable Pre-emption if enabled.
(Disable preemption on High Availability settings to avoid unexpected fail overs. Disabling preempt configuration change must be committed on both peers. Once completed, re-enabling must be committed on both peers)

– Go to Device > High Availability > Election Settings and uncheck Preemptive. Then, commit the change.

View of PAN-OS Device High Availability screen in Election Settings

– Suspend Primary Panorama to make Secondary Panorama as active
– From Primary Panorama, suspend High Availability function:
– – CLI: > request high-availability state suspend
– – GUI: Device > High Availability > Operations > click Suspend Local Device

View of PAN-OS Device High Availability screen in Optional Commands

– Verify suspend status on Primary/passive Panorama.
– Verify all firewalls are connected to Secondary/active Panorama.
– On the Primary Panorama, download, install and reboot the latest preferred x maintenance release.
– Save/export tech support and device state and save named device config snapshots (this is in case downgrade is needed).
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Save/export tech support and device state and save named device config snapshots (this is in case downgrade is needed).
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– re-enable pre-empt if desired
– This concludes upgrade on Primary Panorama.

Secondary Panorama Upgrade procedure:

– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Save/export tech support and device state and save named device config snapshots (this is in case downgrade is needed).
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– This concludes upgrade on Secondary Panorama.

Backup config and device state files just in case: (BACK UP CONFIGURATION AND DEVICE STATE FROM THE CLI)

(Optional but recommended) Post-upgrade verification:

– Verify connectivity between Panorama and Firewalls. If something is not working, skip to troubleshooting section
(For example, check if Panorama is receiving logs with correct time stamp from firewalls after upgrade is completed)

– Test commit-all operations to managed devices, and verify new changes are applied as expected locally on the devices.

4) Firewall Upgrade Procedure (HA):

IMPORTANT NOTE:
If you have the pair in HA(active/passive) then you have to upgrade only to next version of PAN-OS then failover and proceed to upgrade for the second version of PAN-OS. Only upgrade one version at a time.

Example: If you are at PAN-OS x then you should go to x version(let it be any version of PAN-OS) then failover and check the functionality. Otherwise you will run into the error and the HA pairs will no longer be in sync.
Additionally Remember that if there is more than 1 version of difference between the HA pairs then you will run into the &#;Peer version too old&#; issue.

It is recommended to upgrade the Primary firewall first and then upgrade the Secondary firewall. This is done for two reasons:

1) Ensure that HA failover is functioning properly
2) Ensure that the passive firewall is functioning properly and is able to pass traffic without issues

Disable Preemption if enabled.

Disable Preemption on High Availability settings to avoid unexpected fail overs.

Disabling preempt configuration change must be committed on both peers. Once completed, re-enabling must be committed on both peers.

To Disable, got to: Device > High Availability > General > Election Settings > Edit > Uncheck Preemptive.

Then, perform a commit.

View of PAN-OS Device High Availability screen in Election Settings

NOTE: This procedure relies on the administrator having foreseen access to their devices at all times, either by being local or having OOB connectivity to the management network, which is a good practice when upgrading the firewall. In the case where you do not have the option of achieving either, it is a good idea to change the procedure slightly to ensure you don&#;t lose connectivity at the cost of having a less rigid upgrade path.

Having the preempt enabled will require you to keep this config change in mind during the whole process as it could unexpectedly switch over the active membership while upgrading.

Primary firewall upgrade Procedure:

– On Primary firewall, Suspend Primary firewall to make Secondary firewall active
– – CLI: > request high-availability state suspend
– – GUI:  Device > High Availability > Operations > click Suspend Local Device

NOTE: This will cause an HA failover. We recommend doing this first to verify the HA functionality is working before initiating the upgrade. Production traffic is now going through the Secondary firewall which is now active.

– Ask your business owners to verify all applications are working on the network. If there is a problem, skip to troubleshooting section. If there is any problem, fix it before proceeding with upgrade.
– Upgrade Primary firewall. You can do this by either directly downloading and installing software onto the firewall itself or via Panorama Device Deployment > Software option.
– Download, install and reboot the latest preferred x maintenance release.
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Save/export tech support and Device state and save named device config snapshots (this is in case downgrade is needed).
STOP! Please read &#;Important Note&#; in step 4 above before continuing upgrade to
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
​​​​– On the Primary firewall, verify auto commit completes successfully (FIN OK) by running the command before proceeding to the next step: > show jobs all
– Run the following command to make Primary firewall functional again: > request high-availability state functional
– This concludes upgrade on the Primary firewall.

Secondary firewall upgrade procedure:
– Suspend Secondary firewall to make Primary firewall active.
– From Secondary firewall, suspend High Availability function
– – CLI: > request high-availability state suspend
– – GUI: Device > High Availability > Operations > click Suspend Local Device

NOTE: This will cause an HA failover. Production traffic is now going through Primary firewall with new software installed.

– Ask your business owners to verify all applications are working on the network. If there is a problem, skip to troubleshooting section. If there is any problem, fix it before proceeding with upgrade.
– Upgrade Secondary firewall. You can do this by either directly downloading and installing software onto the firewall itself or via Panorama Device Deployment > Software option.
– Download, install and reboot the latest preferred x maintenance release.
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Save/export tech support and Device state and save named device config snapshots (this is in case downgrade is needed).
– Download (base version).
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release and reboot to complete the upgrade.
– Verify auto commit completes successfully (FIN OK) by running the command before proceeding to the next step: > show jobs all
– Run the following command to make Secondary firewall functional again: > request high-availability state functional
– This concludes upgrade on the Secondary firewall

Recommended: Arrange for Out-of-Band access (Console access) to the firewall if possible. This is to help you recover from any unexpected situations where we are unable to login to the firewall.

– Backup config and device state files just in case.
– Make sure no policy or configuration changes are being made by acquiring a config lock.
– Click on the padlock in the upper-righthand corner of the GUI
– Make sure no pending commit jobs on firewall.

Recommended: Post-upgrade verification:

– Now that both Primary and Secondary firewalls are both running the new software, it is a good idea to test failover functionality again.
– Run the following comma to suspend Primary firewall to fail traffic to the Secondary firewall
> request high-availability state suspend

– Ask your business owners to verify all applications are working on the network through the Secondary firewall. If there is a problem, skip to troubleshooting section.
– Run the following CLI command to make Primary firewall functional again:
> request high-availability state functional

– Repeat the process to verify traffic works fine through Primary firewall (suspend the Secondary firewall, test functionality on Primary firewall, then re-enable Secondary firewall).
– This concludes failover test.

Recommended: Enable preemption if it was disabled due to upgrade.

– Re-enabling preempt configuration change must be committed on both Likewise, once completed, re-enabling must be committed on both peers.

– Go to Device > High Availability > Election Settings and check Preemptive. Then, perform a commit.

– This completes upgrade on the HA pair.

View of PAN-OS Device High Availability screen in Election Settings for Preemptive

5) Post-Upgrade Checklist

The following Post-Implementation Activities should be performed prior to the change window end time. Performing these Post-Implementation Activities prior to the change window end time allows time to complete any potential corrective action that might be required after performing these activities.

Compare Post-Implementation results with Pre-Implementation results.

– Reapply the non-persistence settings from the pre-checklist.
– Check system logs for any unexpected errors.
– Check traffic logs for any traffic that is unexpectedly allowed or denied.
– If applicable, verify connectivity and network functionality between firewall and panorama, specifically make sure log forwarding from firewall to Panorama is working.
– Also, validate changes will commit between Panorama and the managed devices.
– Check system reports and incidents for any relevant outages.
– – Monitor help desk tickets post upgrade, this may take 24 to 48 hours.
– Contact all stake holders to communicate any change IDs, describe change activity results, and verify that there are no relevant network alarms, incidents, or outages.
– Monitor the appliance for any anomalies.

6) Troubleshooting Resources

If business applications no longer works after upgrade, reference the links below:
– PAN-OS Upgrade or Content Update Failure
– CONTENT VERSION ERROR UPGRADING MAJOR PLATFORM OS WITH AN OLDER CONTENT DATABASE 

If the device fails to complete auto-commit, reference the links below:
– HOW TO DETERMINE WHEN AUTO-COMMIT IS COMPLETE

If software fails to install, reference the links below:
– SOFTWARE INSTALL OR DOWNLOAD PUSH FROM PANORAMA TO DEVICE WILL NOT COMPLETE
– COMMIT FINISHES WITH AN ERROR RESPONSE: CFGPUSH.S1.DP1.COMM.CFG-DP: ERROR PRE-INSTALLING CONFIG
– LICENSE ERROR: FAILED TO INSTALL LICENSES. UNEXPECTED ERROR OCCURRED

If software fails to download, reference the links below:
– Error downloading , with previously downloaded (General User Discussion)
&#; SOFTWARE DOWNLOAD ERROR: &#;FAILED TO DOWNLOAD DUE TO SERVER ERROR. FAILED TO DOWNLOAD FILE&#;
HA Upgrade issue:
Upgraded Device In HA Group Reports Status: Suspended (Peer version Too Old)

Panorama checklist reference links below:
– QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE: HELPFUL COMMANDS
– TROUBLESHOOTING PANORAMA CONNECTIVITY

If issues cannot be resolved:
– Contact Palo Alto Networks TAC using proactive case number.
– Save configurations of affected network devices.
– Save configurations of the Palo Alto Network devices.
– Add to pcaps, configurations, tech support files, and logs from near by networking devices for post mortem and troubleshooting by support teams.
– Go to the downgrade/back out procedure section.

7) Downgrade Procedure

If the issue cannot be resolved within the allotted change window, you should revert all changes:
– Verify (base image version) is still present on the system.
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the install.
– Verify (base version) is still on the system.
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the install.
– Verify (base version) is still on the system.
– Download and install , and reboot to complete the downgrade.

NOTE: After the Secondary firewall is rebooted, the CLI prompt should show non-functional.
– On the primary firewall, verify auto commit completes successfully (FIN OK) by running the command before proceeding to the next step:
> show jobs all
– Run the following command to make it functional again:
> request high-availability state functional
– This concludes downgrade on the Primary firewall.

Downgrade the Primary firewall
– Suspend the primary firewall to fail traffic to Secondary.
– On the Primary device, suspend the unit from the CLI. Run the command:
> request high-availability state suspend

Save the following files for analysis:
– Save and export Tech support and device state from both active and passive firewalls.
– All core dump files if there is any.
– Packet capture of problem traffic, if observed.
– Assuming the firewall is currently running h3 already and traffic is currently going through the Primary firewall, follow the same upgrade process but in reverse order.

Downgrade the Secondary firewall:
– Verify (base image version) is still present on the system.
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the install.
– Verify (base version) is still on the system.
– Download and install the latest preferred x maintenance release, and reboot to complete the install.
– Verify (base version) is still on the system.
– Download and install , and reboot to complete the downgrade.

NOTE: After the Secondary firewall is rebooted, the CLI prompt should show non-functional.
– On the Secondary firewall, verify auto commit completes successfully (FIN OK) by running the CLI command before proceeding to the next step:
> show jobs all
– Run the following command to make it functional again:
> request high-availability state functional
– This concludes downgrade on the Secondary firewall.

Recommended: Enable preemption if it was disabled due to upgrade.
– Re-enabling preempt configuration change must be committed on both. Once completed, re-enabling must be committed on both peers.
– Go to Device > High Availability > Election Settings& and check Preemptive. Then, perform a commit.

View of PAN-OS Device High Availability screen in Election Settings for Preemptive Setting

Recommended: Ask your business owners to verify all applications are working on the network. If there is a problem, skip to troubleshooting section.
– Upload all files to the Palo Alto Networks proactive support case for troubleshooting later.
– This concludes the downgrade process.

Reference: https://knowledgebase.paloaltonetworks.com/KCSArticleDetail?id=kA10gClRrCAK

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Published by Raghavendra Seshumurthy

My name is Raghavendra Seshumurthy. Presently I am working as a technolgy manager for Microland Organization. I have experience on security/cloud products: F5, Checkpoint, ASA, PA, AWS, Bluecoat, VPN, PITC, Zscaler, Azure, GCP, network, security, cloud. This blog is created just to share thoughts on new technologies and features in the network, security and cloud environment. View all posts by Raghavendra Seshumurthy

Sours: https://indepthtechnology.org//07/05/palo-alto-panorama-and-firewall-upgrade-procedure/
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Overview

The best security operating platform just got even better with the recent release of PAN-OS Not surprising that there are over 70 exciting new features/upgrades that we believe will improve your security posture.

Some of these new features are industry firsts especially those with new machine learning capabilities to automatically analyze traffic and recommend appropriate security policies.

Machine Learning and automated security are major feature drivers for PAN-OS 10 with their current subscriptions Wildfire, DNS Security, and URL Filtering. Also new with version 10 is a brand new IoT Security subscription.

 

1. Machine-Learning + Strata Firewall

With Palo Alto releasing an industry-first machine-learning powered firewall and Wildfire, this Strata firewall subscription has always been the strongest tool in the toolkit to prevent against the ever-growing increase of zero-day threats in the wild. Up until this point, Palo Alto Networks has been able to respond to these global threats as quickly as 5 minutes. But even that in today’s threat landscape isn’t fast enough to protect against the most advanced targeted attacks.

The Strata Firewall is now capable of analyzing Windows executables and PowerShell scripts using machine learning on the data plane. This enables you to intercept malware before it can infiltrate your network by providing real-time analysis capabilities on the firewall, which reduces the possibility of propagation of unknown malware variants. So, you are able to prevent up to 95% of zero-day malware inline (resulting in a percent reduction in systems infected). Combining this with zero-delay signature updates cuts down the response time to 5 seconds!

But it doesn’t stop there. The firewall can also use machine learning on the data plane to analyze web page content to determine if it contains malicious JavaScript or is being used for credential phishing. Inline ML prevents web page threats from infiltrating your network by providing real-time analysis capabilities on the firewall, reducing the possibility of the proliferation of unknown JavaScript variants and various phishing vectors. I believe the best part about this is if you already have the Wildfire and URL Filtering subscriptions, you will also have the new file-based and web-based ML-powered capabilities to prevent nefarious activities.

 

2. IoT Security

Speaking of nefarious activities looking to exploit our environments. Internet of Things (IoT) devices have quickly become a problem for corporate environments.  They are rapidly climbing the list of avenues taken by hackers to breach a network.  Palo Alto Networks saw this as an increasing problem and last year acquired the ML-powered solution Zingbox. If you’ve been following Palo Alto Networks for some time, you know they are not strangers to acquiring other cybersecurity companies. Luckily, they do an incredible job of incorporating these acquisitions within their Security Operating Platform.

Palo Alto Networks’ new firewall IoT Security subscription allows Strata firewalls to dynamically discover and maintain a real-time inventory of the IoT devices on your network. Through AI and machine-learning algorithms, you can achieve a high level of accuracy with classifying current and brand new IoT devices seen for the first time. With this dynamic capability, your IoT device inventory is always up to date.

The dynamic capabilities of IoT Security also provide the automatic generation of policy recommendations to control IoT device traffic, as well as the automatic creation of IoT device attributes for use in firewall policies. The firewall can now collect metadata to detect and identify devices on your network and obtain recommendations on how to secure them. You’ll know what devices are connected and then use those devices as match criteria to create adaptive device-based policy rules. This is especially important in environments with an increasing demand for BYOD and IoT devices. This subscription will help tremendously with this difficult problem.

 

3. SD-WAN Enhancements from the CloudGenix Acquisition

Speaking of another acquisition Palo Alto Networks has made within the last year or so is CloudGenix. The first iteration of their SD-WAN solution released earlier this year in Q1. It focused on application health with jitter, delay, latency. In my opinion, it wasn’t mature enough for customers to move over just yet to their solution. This latest release is beginning to change my mind. There are far too many features to talk about within SD-WAN alone so I will shorten it.

 

SD-WAN New Features

&#; Flexible Deployment Options: mesh, hub-and-spoke, cloud-based

&#; Pre-defined thresholds for common application categories

&#; Forward Error Correction (FEC)

&#; Packet Duplication

&#; SAAS App path monitoring

&#; Passive performance health switch path measuring jitter, delay, latency, packet loss via application flows

&#; Active methods ICMP, HTTP(s) pings to the target IP or URL

&#; Zero Touch Provisioning

&#; Simply enable the SD-WAN subscription on your Next-Generation Firewalls and begin

&#; Best implemented with Prisma Access as the SD-WAN hub

&#; Central management via Panorama

 

4. Container-Based Virtual Firewall for Kubernetes

Now for another industry first.The industry’s 1st next-generation firewall delivered in a container form factor & natively integrated with Kubernetes, the containerized version of ML-Powered Next-Generation Firewall (NGFW). The CN-NGFW is designed specifically for Kubernetes environments, leveraging deep container context to protect inbound, outbound, and east-west traffic between container trust zones (i.e. between namespaces, or between PCI-infected apps and non-PCI apps), along with other components of enterprise IT environments.

This is especially important because up until this point Palo Networks firewalls were only able to be deployed at the edge of a Kubernetes environment. Containers seem like a secure option for running applications. But while containers are walled off from each other, many are deployed on the same IP space. If attackers gain access to even a single container, they can then spread the attack throughout the cluster. With this new CN-NGFW, we are now able to focus on picosegmentation to see and protect all traffic between containers.

 

5. GlobalProtect Client VPN Enhancements

I think this next feature will excite those who have had to expand their remote workforce due to current times (basically all of us). We’re all in this together and GlobalProtect is here to help protect our remote workers in the cyber world. GlobalProtect now makes it easier for you to block compromised devices from your network and keep them off until they have been sanitized. This is done by allowing you to track these devices via unique attributes such as the hardware serial number of the device and unique host information.

This ability can be preferable instead of blocking by IP address. Device IP addresses change all of the time due to different locations, networks, etc. Security policies based on IP addresses only then become ineffective and could allow the endpoint back on the network. After GlobalProtect identifies a device as compromised, it can automatically add the device to a quarantine list and permanently block it from accessing the network. You can set security policies to quarantine the device or manually add it to a quarantine list. This cuts response time down incredibly and allows us deeper visibility into your remote workforce.

 

6. Encryption & Decryption

As it’s always been, we can’t protect what we can’t see. Decryption has always been an issue for the industry. Now, 70% of malware is encrypted & designed to evade security measures. Some companies have figured this problem out, but most are still having their own issues. You can now decrypt, gain full visibility, and prevent known and unknown threats within TLSv protocol traffic. TLSv is the latest version of the TLS protocol, which provides security and performance improvements for applications. Today, 33% of TLS traffic is utilized by the TLSv protocol. PAN-OS supports TLSv decryption in all decryption modes available within the platform.

 

Conclusion

It’s another exciting time within the cybersecurity industry. As always with these new features and upgrades, you’ll want to get your hands on them as soon as possible and start implementing. But it’s always our recommendation to wait until Palo Alto Networks TAC changes their recommended OS version to the new X implementation of the software. This will reduce the implications of any potential bugs that may affect your environment. As history states though it will not take much time for Palo Alto Networks to release those .x fixes.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about these newly released capabilities, please use the form below to get in touch with our Palo Alto Networks team here at Integration Partners.

Sours: https://integrationpartners.com/blog/themajor-updates-coming-in-pan-os/
Demisto and the Palo Alto Networks Application Framework

Thursday, November 19,

By Charles Buege, Fuel User Group Member

A few weekends ago, I embarked on the adventure of upgrading my PA to PAN-OS With the articles I’ve written in the past and since version 10 has been out for a while now, I wanted to start getting some experience with it myself, so I figured it was time to pull the trigger and upgrade my lab.

I allocated an hour or so one evening to perform the upgrade, but as the old adage goes, “The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry.” It’s fair to say it took a bit longer than I expected.

As a personal idiosyncrasy, I do not upgrade anything to the X.0 version — I’ve been burned way too many times. I now wait for at least one minor version release, preferably two, before upgrading to a major release, to make sure the worst of the newly introduced issues are taken care of. And as dumb luck would have it — even though I was ready to make an exception with because I’d done my homework and had no concerns — was released just a couple days before I set out on upgrading, keeping my tradition of not deploying an X.0 version of something going.

On my PA, I’d been working with an older version of the PAN-OS for quite some time (), because it kept working, had all of the capabilities that I needed, and if it isn’t broke, you don’t fix it. So, after going to my firewall’s Device -> Software, I clicked on “Check Now” and waited for the page to refresh, planning to click on “Download” for  

I waited and …. nothing. and did not show up. What’s going on here? I didn’t get it. 

I was SO certain that everything I’d read said the PA was compatible with version That’s part of the reason I’d gotten this model and not spent the additional money for the next larger model. I went ahead and checked another PA that I had access to and did a “Check Now”’ on its “Software” page, too, and yep — there it is: and are listed plain as day.

This only added to my confusion. Did I have an older model of a PA? Was my device from an earlier batch that wasn’t version 10 compatible? Were there other people out there that had the same problem as me? What was I missing here? It was time to jump on the interwebs and do some research.  

I found a lot of people sharing that the upgrade took upwards of an hour, people who said the new web interface was slow on their PAs, and others who realized that they needed to clear out old images to free up space — but no one had my problem.

What did that mean? I was the oddball here. This didn’t surprise me. If there was a way to make something happen in a weird way, I’m good at that, so I set to figure this out. I would do a side by side comparison between the two PAs that I have access to, to see what their differences were and why and shows up on one but not on the other.

I remembered that when I first activated my PA that if I didn’t have my dynamic update downloaded for my “Application and Threats,” that my “Antivirus” wouldn’t download, so I checked my dynamics updates. Are all of these up to date?  I look — yes, within a version or two. Nothing more than a day out of sync. It wasn’t that. 

Next, I compared versions of software running on the PAs themselves. What are they both running?

Eureka — I was onto something here!  

As I mentioned earlier, my lab PA is running , as I’d never needed to upgrade it. Well, the other PA that I had access to is running version That’s right! When I put THAT PA in place, I specifically wanted to work with version X of the PAN-OS, as I’d heard it had so many new capabilities that people said it should have been named , not  

Could that be my solution? Could the fact that the PAN-OS won’t let you attempt to upgrade to 10 until you are running at least X on it? I had to find out!

I began the download process of getting versions and onto the box. Version is required to be downloaded onto the PA if you are going to install any version higher than X. With both versions downloaded, I kicked off the installation of After the installation, reboot and waiting for the subsequent initialization to complete with version installed, I logged back into the web interface.  I went to Device -> Software, clicked on “Check Now” and — lo and behold — I had and available to me!

If you’ve made it through my saga thus far, congrats. One thing that I did learn from this process that you can take right away from this article: You cannot upgrade PAN-OS directly from X to X. You must upgrade to X first.

Continuing on, I downloaded both images for version and and installed version After the installation, reboot and subsequent initialization to complete, I was able to log into version of the PAN-OS on my lab PA Upgrade complete.

I want to address a couple of the comments that I came across in my online search as I was trying to figure out my issue earlier:

1. “It took over an hour for my PA to upgrade to ”

I cannot speak to that. When I came across these comments, I decided to time out my process. My PA upgrade from to took the following amount of time:

        • 10 minutes from start of install to first reboot

        • 21 minutes from first reboot to login screen responding and web UI interacting

        • Total time: 31 minutes

To me, this is acceptable for a lab environment for a major version upgrade. Others may disagree, but that’s my opinion.

2. “The new web interface is a lot slower on my PA”

I am seeing this comment in many places. The web pages do tend to load a little slower, yes. However, we are looking at a more powerful PAN-OS running on an albeit small box doing a lot more stuff. Sacrifices will have to be made for cost savings. Personally, I think the increase in time is very minimal and only in some areas. I’d also recommend that you let each main tab — Dashboard, ACC, Monitor, Policies, Objects, Network, Device — load fully before selecting any options. This will allow any background images to be cached to your local system and will improve subsequent browsing to go faster for you.

3. Some users realized they needed to clear out some old images to make room for version

There’s not much I can say to that. Storage is finite and sometimes you need to clear out space. Personally, I only keep the previous version I was using on the system for a week or two after an upgrade in case I need to go back to it quickly. Otherwise, I clear it out to keep the clutter to a minimum. Others may need to keep more images for other reasons, and that is up to them to decide.

As I alluded to at the start of this journey, things almost never go as planned. What I’d planned on being an hour or so of my day ended up taking almost three hours. Here was my overall breakdown in time:

  • 45 minutes: Trying to figure out why I couldn’t get version 10 to show up on my PA, trying “Check Now,” verifying DNS information/internet connectivity, performing internet research about the problem

  • 30 minutes: Side-by-side comparison between my PA and second PA I had access to

  • 5 minutes: Download of image

  • 3 minutes: Failed upgrade of because I forgot I needed to be downloaded for upgrade to take effect

  • 5 minutes: Download of image

  • 25 minutes: Upgrade of lab PA to

  • 10 minutes: Download of images and (I remembered I needed both this time)

  • 30 minutes: Upgrade of lab PA to

  • 10 minutes: Testing of PA web interface, exploring, checking machines behind firewall are working as expected, can access internet, etc.

Total time (approx.): 2 hours, 43 minutes

Thank you for reading my article. I hope, if nothing else, my trials and tribulations during this exercise has brought a smile or two to your day.

 

Charles Buege is the senior DevOps engineer for Temeda, an Industrial IoT company out of Naperville, Illinois. He currently holds a PCNSA certification and is working towards his PCNSE. He also runs an IT-based Meetup group called “The IT Crowd”.


More to Explore

Check out these Fuel blog posts for further reading:

Sours: https://blog.fuelusergroup.org/how-i-did-it-palab-upgrade-to-pan-os

Tac recommended alto version palo

By the way, Kirill recently moved to work in another company, and Andrey played a certain role in this. They led two teams that worked on parallel and related projects. As a result, Andrey and Kirill had serious disagreements over the methods of joint work, the distribution of responsibility, how to control the progress of work, etc.etc.

Upgrading the Palo Alto OS

I did my best this time, the Broker decided to himself. He glanced at the girl, who at that time had already closed the door and was looking somewhere into the darkness, licking slightly weathered. Cubes.

Now discussing:

She herself switched to "you", and even so quickly. Well, then it will be easy to get to know each other. Two minutes later, I walked her home without a dog. She lived very close, so we quickly arrived, and I did not want to leave her at all.



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