Rash around blood donation site

Rash around blood donation site DEFAULT

Safety is paramount in everything we do, because lives depend on it. Canada’s blood and blood products supply is recognized as one of the safest in the world, and the health and safety of the donors who contribute to that vital resource are equally important to us.

Prior to or during your appointment to donate blood, plasma or platelets, you will be asked to read a brochure with important health and safety information. During your appointment you will be asked to confirm you have read and understood it. You will be able to ask any questions. The brochures are also available at the links below, followed by answers to a variety of questions about donation safety. If you have a question that isn’t answered here, contact us at 1 2 DONATE or email us.

What you must know to donate blood
What you must know to donate plasma and platelets
What you must know to donate plasma at the following locations: Sudbury ( Lasalle Boulevard), Lethbridge ( Mayor Magrath Drive South), Kelowna ( Harvey Avenue – Orchard Park Mall)

Frequently asked questions about blood donation safety

Sours: https://www.blood.ca/en/blood/donating-blood/donor-health-and-safety

PMC

Hari Krishan Dhawan

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

Satyam Arora

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

Suchet Sachdev

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

R. R. Sharma

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

Neelam Marwaha

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
Correspondence to: Dr. Neelam Marwaha, Department of Transfusion Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh &#x; , India. E-mail: [email protected]
Copyright © Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Introduction

Adhesive dressing application to the phlebotomy site is a norm that is usually followed by all blood banks as postdonation care. The purpose is to provide an environment conducive for healing i.e. prevent infection. However whether we need a medicated antiseptic dressing is of doubtful value. The risk of infection at phlebotomy site is estimated to be 1 in ,,[1] whereas the reported allergy to medicated antiseptics could reach upto 15%.[2]

Observation

An erythematous rash developed in one of our first time blood donor, exactly over the area covered under the region of medicated area of the adhesive dressing applied post phlebotomy. The donor observed this rash and itching 24 hours after removing the dressing. There was no history of any drug allergy during donor screening [Figure 1].

Pathophysiology of Clinical Event

The adhesive dressing was medicated with nitrofurazone (%w/w), which is reported to be a known contact medicament-allergen.[3,4,5] The donor was diagnosed to have allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and was prescribed topical corticosteroids. Resolution of symptoms occurred within 3 days. Sensitivity to both medicament and adhesive part of medicated dressing is reported.[3] Furthermore, breach of skin barrier is known to predispose to such allergy and the contact of even haptens with the exposed proteins results in the formation of complete allergen. The primary presentation of ACD is limited to the typical area of contact similar to the presentation noted in our case in which rash was limited to the medicated part of dressing and area under adhesive part is free from rash. The donor was counseled regarding the allergy to nitrofurazone and to avoid intake as well as contact with this drug in future.

Preventive Measures

Non-medicated dressings can be considered to avoid such allergies because phlebotomy site is always prepared with an antiseptic and sterile needles are used. This case highlights the need of active donor hemovigilance program so that delayed donor adverse events can be managed appropriately to the satisfaction of the donor.

Footnotes

Source of Support: Nil

Conflict of Interest: None declared.

Refrences

1. Newman BH. Donor reactions and injuries from whole blood donation. Trans Med Rev. ;– [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
2. Bajpai M, Gupta S, Chatterjee K. Are medicated adhesive bands at the phlebotomy site useful? Indian J Hematol Blood Transfus. ;–[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
3. Beck MH, Wilkinson SM. Contact Dermatitis: Allergic. In: Burns T, Breathnach S, Cox N, Griffiths C, editors. Rook&#x;s textbook of dermatology. USA: Blackwell Publishing company; pp. – [Google Scholar]
4. Guijarro SC, Sanchez-Perez J, Garcia-Diez A. Allergic contact dermatitis to polyethylene glycol and nitrofurazone. Am J Contact Dermat. ;– [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
5. Ballmer-Weber BK, Elsner P. Contact allergy to nitrofurazone. Contact Dermatitis. ;– [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

Articles from Asian Journal of Transfusion Science are provided here courtesy of Wolters Kluwer -- Medknow Publications

Sours: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC/
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  3. Lump on xiphoid process

Giving blood is usually very safe, and the minor discomfort donors experience are a small price to pay for potentially saving multiple lives. In rare cases, blood donors suffer side effects. They include skin rashes and more serious allergic reactions.

Blood is, quite literally, the stuff of life — by donating some of yours, you could save multiple people's lives, as patients who have suffered serious trauma, those undergoing surgery, or those suffering hemorrhage after childbirth could all desperately need blood or blood products, along with many who live with chronic medical conditions such as sickle cell disease.

Giving blood can be a little scary, especially the first time, but the folks who decide to become blood donors will ultimately expect nothing but a little discomfort during the process and some transient feelings of weakness — easily remedied by the juice you will probably be given right after you are done giving blood — after this fairly short procedure. Most of the time, reality will match their expectations and giving blood is tolerated very well. Research reveals that a mere percent of blood donors experience any kind of adverse reaction, and when this does happen, it's not usually serious.

For some blood donors, however, the side effects of donating blood can be more invasive. The adverse reactions some people suffer after donating blood range from arm pain and tingling and bleeding at the site where blood was taken, to more serious consequences such as an air embolism or compartment syndrome. 

Allergic reactions, which can be systemic or localized, represent another fairly rare side effect of donating blood. What should blood donors watch out for, and what should you do if this happens to you?

A skin rash after giving blood: What causes this localized allergic reaction, and what should you know about it?

Some blood donors will suffer from a red skin rash immediately around the venipuncture site, meaning the area where their blood was drawn, when they remove the bandage that was placed over the site. Redness itself, without any additional symptoms, may simply be the result of pulling the bandage off. 

Should the skin be itchy, sore, and swollen in addition to the redness, however, that is an indication that you could be experiencing a localized allergic reaction. Some blood donors will immediately start to worry that they are dealing with an infection of some kind, or that the needle itself led to this side effect. The actual culprit can almost always be found in one of two things. 

The first factor to examine would be the antiseptic adhesive dressing most blood banks use to help prevent post-donation infections. These are typically medicated with an antimicrobial agent called nitrofurazone. Research indicates that up to 15 percent of the population may display allergic reactions, and has questioned whether the use of antiseptic bandages is even warranted after donating blood. Besides allergic reactions to this and other medications used in dressings, some people will also have contact dermatitis as a direct result of the adhesives with which the dressings are made. 

The second factor would be the antiseptic blood bank personnel use to wipe the area of skin where they then insert the needle, something that is done both before the needle is inserted and after it is removed. 

In some cases, these side effects can be avoided by removing the dressing and thoroughly cleaning the area of skin where your blood was drawn with simple soap and water, which removes residual antiseptic and adhesive products.

So, what do you do when this happens to you? See your doctor if your skin isn't just a bit red, but also swollen, painful, itchy, or all of the above. Your localized allergic reaction can most likely be treated very easily with corticosteroids. In future, if you donate blood again, you will want to ask for a non-medicated dressing!

Systemic allergic reactions after donating blood?

While systemic allergic reactions — reactions of the kind that affect the entire body — are exceedingly rare after donating blood, they do sometimes happen. These anaphylactic reactions are characterized by symptoms that clearly tell you something is very wrong. You may be wheezing and short of breath, experience a skin flush all over your body, have swollen lips, feel nauseous and may even vomit, and your skin could turn blue because your organs are not getting enough oxygen. You may also experience heart palpitations. 

The most common underlying cause can, again, be found in a component of the blood donation process that is actually meant to keep you safe, namely the ethylene oxide gas that is sometimes employed to sterilize the equipment used during the donation. You will want to seek immediate medical assistance if you notice any of these symptoms after donating blood, and tell your first responders that you have just donated blood to help them narrow down the cause of your severe allergic reaction. 

Donating blood saves lives: Don't be scared to participate!

Blood donors are given physical checkups and asked questions about their medical history before their first donation precisely because blood banks do their best to keep the awesome people who are willing to go the extra mile and help save lives safe. Make sure to answer the questions you are asked about your history of allergies thoroughly, even if you are not sure why this information is relevant. If you have had minor allergic reactions like localized skin rashes after giving blood in the past, make especially sure to tell your blood bank this so they can help you avoid the same symptoms this time. 

First-time blood donors who are scared to give blood after reading this should be aware that systemic allergic reactions are incredibly unlikely, and that giving blood is usually a very safe procedure. Everyone should, however, keep an extra close eye on any physical reactions they may be experiencing after donating blood or blood products, so they can sound the alarm in a timely manner if allergic reactions or other side effects do make an appearance. 

Sours: https://www.steadyhealth.com/articles/the-side-effects-of-blood-donation-what-to-do-if-you-have-a-skin-rash-or-other-allergic-reaction-after-giving-blood
CAN DONATING BLOOD IMPACT BODYBUILDING PERFORMANCE?

Frequently Asked Questions

S.","description": "<p>Donating&nbsp;blood is a simple thing to do, but can make a big difference in the lives of others. The donation process from the time you arrive until the time you leave takes about an hour.&nbsp;The donation itself is only about minutes on average.&nbsp;The steps in the process are:</p> <p>Registration</p> <ol style=list-style-position: inside;> <li>You will complete donor registration, which includes information such as your name, address, phone number, and donor identification number (if you have one).</li> <li>You will be asked to show a donor card, driver’s license or two other forms of ID.</li> </ol> <p>Health History and Mini Physical</p> <ol style=list-style-position: inside;> <li>You&nbsp;will answer some&nbsp;questions&nbsp;during a private and confidential interview about your health history and the places you have traveled.</li> <li>You will have your temperature, hemoglobin, blood pressure and pulse checked.</li> </ol> <p>Donation</p> <ol style=list-style-position: inside;> <li>We&nbsp;will cleanse an area on your arm and insert a brand–new, sterile needle for the blood draw. This feels like a quick pinch and is over in seconds.</li> <li>You will have some time to relax while the bag is filling. (For a whole blood donation, it is about minutes. If you are donating platelets, red cells or plasma by apheresis the collection can take up to 2 hours.)</li> <li>When approximately a pint of blood has been collected, the donation is complete and a staff person will place a bandage on your arm.&nbsp;</li> </ol> <p>Refreshments</p> <ol style=list-style-position: inside;> <li>You will spend a few minutes enjoying refreshments to allow your body time to adjust to the slight decrease in fluid volume. </li> <li>After minutes you can then leave the donation site and continue with your normal daily activities. </li> <li>Enjoy the feeling of accomplishment knowing that you have helped to save lives.</li> </ol> <p>Your gift of blood may help up to three people. Donated red blood cells do not last forever. They have a shelf-life of up to 42 days. A healthy donor may donate every 56 days.</p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "What should I do after donating blood?","description": "<p>After you give blood:</p> <p><b>Take the following precautions</b>:</p> <ul style=list-style-position: inside;> <li>Drink an extra four glasses (eight ounces each) of non-alcoholic liquids.</li> <li>Keep your bandage on and dry for the next five hours, and do not do heavy exercising or lifting.</li> <li>If the needle site starts to bleed, raise your arm straight up and press on the site until the bleeding stops.</li> <li>Because you could experience dizziness or loss of strength, use caution if you plan to do anything that could put you or others at risk of harm. For any hazardous occupation or hobby, follow applicable safety recommendations regarding your return to these activities following a blood donation.</li> <li>Eat healthy meals and consider adding <a href=https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/blood-donation-process/before-during-after/iron-blood-donation.html target=_blank>iron-rich foods</a> to your regular diet, or discuss taking an iron supplement with your health care provider, to replace the iron lost with blood donation.</li> <li><b>If you get a bruise</b>:&nbsp;&nbsp;Apply ice to the area intermittently for minutes during the first 24 hours. Thereafter, apply warm, moist heat to the area intermittently for minutes. A rainbow of colors may occur for about 10 days.</li> <li><b>If you get dizzy or lightheaded</b>:&nbsp;&nbsp;Stop what you are doing, lie down, and raise your feet until the feeling passes and you feel well enough to safely resume activities.</li> <li><b>And remember to enjoy the feeling of knowing you have helped save lives!</b></li> <li><b>Schedule your next appointment</b>.</li> </ul> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "Will it hurt when you insert the needle?","description": "<p>Only for a moment. Pinch the fleshy, soft underside of your arm. That pinch is similar to what you will feel when the needle is inserted.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "How long does a blood donation take?","description": "<p>The entire process takes about one hour and 15 minutes; the actual donation of a pint of whole blood unit takes eight to 10 minutes. However, the time varies slightly with each person depending on several factors including the donor’s health history and attendance at the blood drive.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "How long will it take to replenish the pint of blood I donate?","description": "<p>The plasma&nbsp;from your donation is&nbsp;replaced within about 24 hours. Red cells need about four to six weeks for complete replacement. That’s why at least eight weeks are required between whole blood donations.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "Why does the Red Cross ask so many personal questions when I give blood?","description": "<p>The highest priorities of the Red Cross are the safety of the blood supply and our blood donors. Some individuals may be at risk of transferring communicable disease through blood donation due to exposure via travel or other activities or may encounter problems with blood donation due to their health. We ask these questions to ensure that it is safe for patients to receive your blood and to ensure that it is safe for you to donate blood that day.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": " How often can I donate blood?","description": "<p>You must wait at least eight weeks (56 days) between donations of whole blood and 16 weeks ( days) between Power Red&nbsp;donations. Platelet apheresis donors may give every 7 days up to 24 times per year.&nbsp;Regulations are different for those giving blood for themselves (autologous donors).<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "Who can donate blood?","description": "<p>In most states, donors must be age 17 or older. Some states allow donation by year-olds with a signed parental consent form. Donors must weigh at least pounds and be in good health. Additional&nbsp;eligibility criteria&nbsp;apply.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Blood Donation Process","slug": "donating-blood-blood-donation-process"}},{"title": "Are guests or kids allowed to come to blood drives or donation centers with a donor?","description": "<p>During this coronavirus outbreak, the Red Cross is not allowing guests including children to enter a blood drive or center to ensure we can maintain social distancing as we adhere to new safety precautions.</p> ","category": {"name": "Preparations","slug": "donating-blood-preparations"}},{"title": "What is apheresis?","description": "<p>Apheresis is the process by which platelets and other specific blood components (red cells or plasma) are collected from a donor. The word “apheresis” is derived from the Greek word aphaeresis meaning “to take away.” This process is accomplished by using a machine called a cell separator. Blood is drawn from the donor and the platelets, or another blood component, are collected by the cell separator and the remaining components of the blood are returned to the donor during the donation. Each apheresis donation procedure takes about one-and-one-half to two hours. Donors can watch movies or relax during the donation.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Platelet Donations","slug": "donating-blood-platelets"}},{"title": "What are platelets and how are they used?","description": "<p><a href=https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html target=_blank>Platelets</a> are tiny, colorless, disc-shaped particles circulating in the blood, and they are essential for normal blood clotting. Platelets are critically important to the survival of many patients with clotting problems (aplastic anemia, leukemia) or cancer, and patients who will undergo organ transplants or major surgeries like heart bypass grafts. Platelets can only be stored for five days after being collected. Maintaining an adequate supply of this lifesaving, perishable product is an ongoing challenge.<br /> </p> ","category": {"name": "Platelet Donations","slug": "donating-blood-platelets"}},{"title": "How often can I give platelets?","description": "<p>Every 7 days up to 24 apheresis donations can be made in a year. Some apheresis donations can generate&nbsp;two or three&nbsp;adult-sized <a href=https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/platelet-donation.html target=_blank>platelet transfusion</a> doses from one donation!<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Platelet Donations","slug": "donating-blood-platelets"}},{"title": "Public officials are telling people to stay home, but you’re encouraging people to go out to give blood. Why are you contradicting that guidance? ","description": "<p>Giving blood is considered an essential community service. As part of our nation’s critical infrastructure, healthy individuals can still donate in areas that have issued shelter in place declarations. The Red Cross is working closely with national and local officials, and</p> <p>recommends people leave home only for necessities—be they health care, groceries, or blood donation.</p> <p>In fact, the U.S. surgeon general has said, “(Y)ou can still go out and give blood. We’re worried about potential blood shortages in the future. Social distancing does not have to mean social disengagement.” The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration have also issued statements encouraging blood donation for those who are well.</p> <p>During a crisis, we see the best of humanity when people step up and help their neighbors. Amid this coronavirus emergency, we are asking individuals to take this responsibility seriously by practicing social distancing and donating blood. These two activities—which are not mutually exclusive—will go a long way in keeping community members healthy by slowing the spread of the virus and by ensuring that patients across the country receive lifesaving blood.</p> <p>We understand that people have concerns right now about all aspects of public health, but want to stress that donating blood is a safe process and people should not hesitate to give. It’s important to note that blood drives have highest standards of safety and infection control. We are also spacing beds, where possible, to follow social distancing practices between blood donors and are looking at staggering donor appointments further apart to reduce the number of&nbsp;people at a drive at any one time.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "The public is being asked to avoid mass gatherings. Aren’t blood drives mass gatherings? ","description": "<p>Like a hospital, grocery store, or pharmacy, a blood drive is essential to ensuring the health of the community, and the <a href=/content/redcrossblood/en/give.html target=_self>Red Cross will continue to hold blood drives during this challenging time to help meet patient needs.</a> In fact, the U.S. surgeon general has said, <i>“You can still go out and give blood. We’re worried about potential blood shortages in the future. Social distancing does not have to mean social disengagement.”</i></p> <p>We understand that people have concerns right now about all aspects of public health, but want to stress that donating blood is a safe process and people should not hesitate to give. Most blood drives are not considered “mass gatherings” as these are controlled events with trained staff and appropriate <a href=/content/redcrossblood/en/donate-blood/dlp/coronavirus--covidand-blood-donation.html target=_self>safety measures to protect donors and recipients</a>. It’s important to note that at each blood drive and donation center, Red Cross employees follow thorough safety protocols to help prevent the spread of any type of infection.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "I tried to make an appointment to donate blood, but there are no blood drives near me? ","description": "<p>The Red Cross is adding appointment slots at donation centers and expanding capacity at many community blood drives across the country over the next few weeks to ensure ample opportunities for donors to give. We apologize for any inconvenience and want to stress that we are doing everything we can to have more blood drives for our donors. During this challenging time, <a href=/content/redcrossblood/en/give.html target=_self>we hope you will still be able to find a location and time to give for patients who are counting on us.</a></p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Are Red Cross staff members wearing face masks?","description": "<p>Yes. As the nation actively responds and navigates to this evolving pandemic, we are all having to make difficult decisions to ensure our health and safety.&nbsp;The Red Cross follows the&nbsp;highest standards of safety and infection control.&nbsp;For the safety of our donors and staff,&nbsp;the Red Cross requires all those at blood drives and blood donation centers to&nbsp;wear a face mask regardless of their vaccination status.&nbsp;Valve face masks are not permitted. Face shields can be worn in addition to face masks but not as a substitute.</p> <p>The Red Cross recognizes that the current CDC guidance states that only areas of high or substantial transmission need to resume mask wearing, transmission rates at the county level are constantly changing and our goal is to implement a single, organization-wide policy that is safe and consistent for our staff and members of the public who engage with our mission. We understand that the resumption of mask wearing is frustrating and disappointing for many and appreciate your cooperation during this uncertain time.<br> </p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "What safety precautions are in place at Red Cross blood drives to protect staff and donors? ","description": "<p>Safety is our top priority. The Red Cross only collects blood from individuals who are healthy and feeling well at the time of donation. To help keep everyone attending Red Cross blood drives and visiting blood donation centers safe as COVID cases are surging again, the Red Cross requires all blood donors, staff and others to wear a face mask regardless of their vaccination status.</p> <p>At each blood drive and donation center, Red Cross employees have always followed thorough safety protocols to help prevent the spread of any type of infection, including:</p> <p>• Wearing gloves and changing gloves often</p> <p>• Routinely disinfecting donor-touched areas</p> <p>• Using sterile collection sets for every donation, and</p> <p>&nbsp;• Preparing the arm for donation with an aseptic scrub.</p> <p>Additionally, we will continue to utilize additional precautions put into place earlier during the pandemic– to ensure the safety of our employees, volunteers and donors, including:</p> <p>• Hand sanitizer available before entering the drive, as well as throughout the donation process.</p> <p>• All surfaces and equipment receive enhanced disinfection.</p> <p>• Donation appointment emphasis to help manage the flow of donors at drives.</p> <p>These mitigation measures will help ensure staff and donor safety in reducing contact with those who may potentially have COVID, or any, respiratory infection.&nbsp;</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Can donors wear homemade masks, such as cloth masks, bandanas, etc.?","description": "<p>Yes, as long as the cloth or homemade mask covers both their nose and mouth in alignment with updated CDC guidelines.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "What if a donor doesn’t want to wear a mask? For example, what if they have a medical condition that makes it difficult or impossible to wear a mask?","description": "<p>To ensure the safety of our staff and the blood donor community, if a donor does not want to wear a face mask, we ask they postpone their donation for a later date when masks may no longer be required.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Are guests or kids allowed to come to blood drives or donation centers with a donor?","description": "<p>During this coronavirus outbreak, the Red Cross is not allowing guests including children to enter a blood drive or center to ensure we can maintain social distancing as we adhere to new safety precautions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Can donors wear a mask at a blood drive?","description": "<p>Yes. As the nation actively responds and navigates to this evolving pandemic, we are all having to make difficult decisions to ensure our health and safety.&nbsp;The Red Cross follows the&nbsp;highest standards of safety and infection control.&nbsp;For the safety of our donors and staff,&nbsp;the Red Cross requires all those at blood drives and blood donation centers to&nbsp;wear a face mask regardless of their vaccination status.&nbsp;Valve face masks are not permitted. Face shields can be worn in addition to face masks but not as a substitute.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Can staff or donors wear face masks with valves?","description": "<p>In alignment with the CDC, the Red Cross does not permit valve face masks at our blood drives or donation centers for employees, volunteers or donors. Valve face masks protect the individual wearing the mask, but do not protect those who come into contact with them. The Red Cross is committed to ensuring the safest environment possible for all those who engage in our lifesaving mission. If a donor or staff would like to wear a valve mask, they will need to place an additional mask, such as a surgical mask or cloth mask, over the valve mask while at the blood drive.</p> ","category": {"name": "Coronavirus (COVID)","slug": "donating-blood-coronavirus--covid"}},{"title": "Is the antibody test specific to COVID or will other coronavirus antibodies show up as positives?","description": "<p>The Red Cross is using the FDA-authorized Ortho Clinical Diagnostics VITROS® Anti-SARS- CoV2 Total Test, which is&nbsp;specific to COVID Test results may indicate a donor’s past exposure to the COVID virus—regardless whether they developed symptoms. Testing may also identify the presence of antibodies developed after receiving a COVID vaccine.&nbsp;</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "What’s the difference between a diagnostic test and an antibody test?","description": "<p>A diagnostic test detects current infection. An antibody test screens for antibodies in your blood. Antibodies are formed when fighting infection, like COVID An antibody test assesses whether your immune systems has responded to the infection, not if the virus or infection is currently active.&nbsp;</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "What does it mean to have a positive COVID antibody test result?","description": "<p>A positive test results indicates the detection of specific antibodies on two different antibody test to the virus that causes COVID A positive test result indicates that you were likely exposed to the virus, regardless of whether you experienced symptoms or received a COVID vaccine.</p> <p><span style=background-color: transparent;>Individuals should continue to follow all COVID safety guidelines provided by the CDC.&nbsp;As with all tests, false positives, or a test result that incorrectly states the presence of antibodies, can occur. Individuals who receive a positive or reactive test result may be contacted by the Red Cross to request additional information and conduct further testing as part of a research study.</span></p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "By donating blood, will a donor lose the antibodies needed to protect themselves from getting sick again?","description": "<p>No. While blood donation can cause your antibody levels to drop very slightly after donation, they do not affect an individual’s ability to fight off future infection.&nbsp;</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "What is the COVID antibody test?","description": "<p>An antibody test screens for antibodies in your blood. Antibodies are formed when fighting infection, like COVID An antibody test assesses whether your immune systems has responded to the infection, not if the virus is currently present.&nbsp;</p> <p>Specifically, the COVID antibody test used by the Red Cross is available through Emergency Use Authorization by the U.S. Food&nbsp;and Drug Administration.&nbsp;Test results may indicate a donor’s past exposure to the COVID virus—regardless whether they developed symptoms. Testing may also identify the presence of antibodies developed after receiving a COVID vaccine.</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "How accurate is the antibody test that the Red Cross is using?","description": "<p>The Red Cross is<b>&nbsp;</b>using the Ortho Clinical Diagnostics VITROS® Anti-SARS-CoV2 Total Test that is available through FDA Emergency Use Authorization. This test measures total antibodies, unlike some tests that measure a single antibody. A positive result indicates that an individual may have had previous exposure to the virus that causes COVID and their body has developed specific antibodies to the virus. However, antibody tests are not perfect.</p> <p>As with all tests, false positives, or a test result that incorrectly states the presence of antibodies, can occur. On Sept. 21, the Red Cross began secondary testing of donations that come back positive to confirm COVID antibody test results for donors.</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "How long will the Red Cross be antibody testing?","description": "<p>All donations made prior to June 25 will be tested for COVID antibodies. After June 25, , the Red Cross will no longer be testing routine blood donations for COVID antibodies.</p> ","category": {"name": "COVID Antibody Testing","slug": "donating-blood-covidtesting"}},{"title": "What does it mean to have a negative COVID antibody test result?","description": "<p>
Sours: https://www.redcrossblood.org/faq.html

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